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Zim
08-03-2009, 05:16
Part of the reason I said "one of", since I wasn't quite sure whether to take what I was taught as absolutely true... The general consensus when I went to the academy last year was that traffic stops are worse. At least, they result in more deaths, especially as officers get complacent since nothing happens in the vast majority of stops. I rather suspect that the danger of injury per domestic violence call is much higher than per traffic stop, but the latter cause more deaths by being so much more frequent.

I wouldn't be surprised to find that what they teach changes every year, like whether eggs were healthy or not back when I was in school. :clown:


Hmm, my information may be out-of-date, but I was told that "domestic disputes" were the #1 killer of policemen.

lars573
08-04-2009, 19:33
This should top up Rabbits rage metre for the day.

Grand father and pregnant woman tasered at baptism party. (http://rawstory.com/08/news/2009/08/03/grandpa-pregnant-woman-tasered-at-baptism-party/)

KukriKhan
08-04-2009, 19:58
This should top up Rabbits rage metre for the day.

Grand father and pregnant woman tasered at baptism party. (http://rawstory.com/08/news/2009/08/03/grandpa-pregnant-woman-tasered-at-baptism-party/)

Heh
http://jimcee.homestead.com/outrage-ami150.gif

The Stranger
08-09-2009, 13:33
omg... and why the hell is that other officer not stopping his collegue?? that is just insane...

Husar
08-09-2009, 16:26
Who sends three or four officers to tell some people to be quiet anyway? :inquisitive:

Megas Methuselah
08-09-2009, 22:48
This should top up Rabbits rage metre for the day.

Grand father and pregnant woman tasered at baptism party. (http://rawstory.com/08/news/2009/08/03/grandpa-pregnant-woman-tasered-at-baptism-party/)

Unbelievable. They should make a new documentry entitled "Hispanic in America" or something.

Crazed Rabbit
08-12-2009, 21:20
Eh, they could just copy the 'Black in America' or just the 'Non-related to police in America'.

Anyways, in Boise, cops sodomize a man with a taser. (http://www.idahostatesman.com/newsupdates/story/841919.html)

In St Louis, cops pepper spray and arrest a woman (http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/nation/story/5420430FDF2036F08625760B00136BBC?OpenDocument) who took a picture of them at a protest against government health care.

In Coeur D'Alene (pronounced core-da-lane) cops taser a guy who rode past a traffic stop seven times (http://www.nwcn.com/statenews/idaho/stories/NW_080509-deloydscott-SW.ae30411c.html).

In the same city, other cops grope a woman stopped for DUI. (http://www.krem.com/topstories/stories/krem2-080309-cdasexualharassmentclaim.a5cfe08b.html)

Florida cops get in traffic accident, attempt to frame (http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/broward/hollywood/sfl-hollywood-cops-fake-report-b072809,0,350771.story) the person they crashed into because they weren't driving safely. Luckily it's caught on tape or the woman would be in jail.

In New Orleans, a cop is indicted for lying under oath (http://www.nola.com/news/?/base/news-2/1248413132106510.xml&coll=1) during the trial of an alleged drug dealer.

CR

lars573
08-13-2009, 04:30
Why does it seem that every cop in the US is using the Vic Mackey guide to police work?

Zim
08-13-2009, 05:31
Nah. I've only seen a little of the Shield, but it seemed every once in a while Vic would verge on the edge of being an antihero rather than a pure villain. To be a real American cop one's soul must be as black as night, 24/7.

See, first we're screened by an E-Meter. It looks like the one Scientologists use, but the E stands for evil and unlike their's it actually works. Once the most evil and thuggish applicants have been chosen an extensive background check is done. Evidence of having kicked puppies as a child will put you in the front of the line.

Then it's off to a lengthy academy, 4 months in my area (and about to get longer). Here you learn the true tricks of the trade, such as framing people and using excessive force. Of course there's also a "kicking puppies" class, for those who didn't get in on that early in their lives, or need pointers on techniques.

Afterward you don your badge (which shocks you whenever you commit a good deed) and jackboots, then go out into the world to oppress people, like this gentleman here who appears to be writing a ticket. I can only assume the person didn't deserve it. Maybe he was in a hurry today, or everyone was going that fast. Perhaps the officer should be chasing real criminals. One can only know that the man with the badge is in the wrong, since they are irredeemably evil.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Motorofficer.jpg

It shouldn't need to be said but just in case all of the above is a joke. Except the excuses to get out of a ticket, which are real and pretty common, and not even close to the worst people use. :smash:


Why does it seem that every cop in the US is using the Vic Mackey guide to police work?

Banquo's Ghost
08-13-2009, 07:32
Of course, in place of the over-enthusiastic police of the United States, you could have the less keen coppers of the United Kingdom (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cambridgeshire/8198352.stm).


The Chief Constable of Cambridgeshire has apologised after officers took four hours to respond to a call from two nurses being threatened by intruders.

Amy Overend and a friend made an emergency call to police after four men came into their building threatening them with violence and rape.

Fragony
08-13-2009, 08:19
Pure Kafka http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=9ba_1250143000

Husar
08-13-2009, 11:36
Seriously, what a non-story.
If he had come to the funeral and taken them away in handcuffs then you might have a story, but if the police has to let every crack dealer go when he says he wants to go to a funeral that's pretty stupid. It's not the officer's fault that those people were not wearing their seatbelts, maybe next time they really want to go somewhere they should make sure they're not breaking any laws in the process and in terms of seatbelts it's not that hard, is it?

Vladimir
08-13-2009, 12:53
Why does it seem that every cop in the US is using the Vic Mackey guide to police work?

Because the squeaky wheel gets air time.

One of Rabbit's outrages is over a guy who was tazered after he beat a cop in the face with a flashlight.


Of course, in place of the over-enthusiastic police of the United States, you could have the less keen coppers of the United Kingdom (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cambridgeshire/8198352.stm).


The Chief Constable of Cambridgeshire has apologised after officers took four hours to respond to a call from two nurses being threatened by intruders.

Amy Overend and a friend made an emergency call to police after four men came into their building threatening them with violence and rape.

Yes, but UK cops are more polite. :bobby: :flowers:

Banquo's Ghost
08-13-2009, 13:00
Yes, but UK cops are more polite. :bobby: :flowers:

How can one tell? It's impossible to find one. :wink:

lars573
08-13-2009, 16:02
Because the squeaky wheel gets air time.

One of Rabbit's outrages is over a guy who was tazered after he beat a cop in the face with a flashlight.
I'm not talking about that one. I'm talking about the ones who do something illegal and then try to cover it up by framing the victim.

Husar
08-14-2009, 01:37
Russian cops are the real deal. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zAcxAXPLZY) :smash:

Crazed Rabbit
08-16-2009, 21:34
Cop pulls over woman for talking on her cell phone. (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/32414436/ns/today-today_people/) Then it turns out he was wrong, as she as just had her hand up against her cheek. And she prove she doesn't have a cell phone. So then the cop says she was speeding - going 50 in a 45 mph zone. Now, it is extremely rare for anyone to be pulled over, much less given a ticket for, going 5 mph over the limit. And the cop didn't get her speed on radar, of course, he claims (lies) that he paced her car before pulling her over. The truth is her was pissed she proved her innocence an wanted to get her for something.

So she gets out of her minivan and wants to see the evidence, starting to walk towards his cruiser. The cop takes great offense at this, ordering her back into her car. She doesn't comply at first, so her tries to arrest her because she was blacking traffic or something by standing outside her car. She gets back into her car, and the cop pulls her out into the road, tasers her repeatedly though she had done nothing to threaten him him, and throws her down into the middle of the road.

And then arrests her, takes her to the hospital for injuries and charges her with driving with a cellphone, speeding, disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest. All charges were dropped after prosecutors saw the video. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Dik-mgCDcg)

:shame:

CR

Zim
08-16-2009, 23:54
Not as effective as a badge used as a shock collar, but I suppose investigating police officers when they do something heroic is one way to condition them into thuggery. :laugh4:


Officer saves life, faces investigations for his troubles. (http://www.monroenews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090812/NEWS01/708129986)

lars573
08-17-2009, 06:26
An anonymous person=fire fighter :smash:

Crazed Rabbit
08-21-2009, 18:05
A cop lies his pants off (http://www.wftv.com/irresistible/20435114/detail.html) - no, wait, he's unlikely to be punished so he's not lying anything off. Anyways, a cop lies strenuously about a man he pulled over who was chewing breath mints. The cop thought the mints the driver was chewing was crack. The cop says his field test kit returned a positive, which is possible, as those things are terribly unreliable. So he arrested the guy and had him put into jail.

But the cop also said that he say the guy buying crack and that the driver admitted he bought drugs. this jives with the fact that three months after the arrest the substance came back from the lab as certified non-crack.

But during that time the driver couldn't make bail and had to stay in jail, losing his apartment, his job, and his car, which the police impounded and sold. I wonder if the cop feels bad about that. Since he lied so much, I'm guessing that sort of thing doesn't phase him.

KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- A man is suing the Kissimmee Police Department for an arrest over mints. When officers pulled Donald May over for an expired tag, they thought the mints he was chewing were crack and arrested him.

May told Eyewitness News they wouldn't let him out of jail for three months until tests proved the so-called drugs were candy.

May said he was just minding his business, driving home from work, when a Kissimmee police officer pulled him over near 192.

"I don't know how it occurred," he said.

May was pulled over for an expired tag on his car. When the officer walked up to him, he noticed something white in May's mouth. May said it was breath mints, but the officer thought it was crack cocaine.

"He took them out of my mouth and put them in a baggy and locked me up [for] possession of cocaine and tampering with evidence," May explained.

The officer claimed he field-tested the evidence and it tested positive for drugs. The officer said he saw May buying drugs while he was stopped at an intersection. He also stated in his report May waived his Miranda rights and voluntarily admitted to buying drugs.

May said that never happened.

"My client never admitted he purchased crack cocaine. Why would he say that?" attorney Adam Sudbury said.

May was thrown in jail and was unable to bond out for three months. He didn't get out until he received a letter from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the State Attorney's Office that test results showed no drugs were found.

"While I was sitting in jail I lost my apartment. I lost everything," he said.

While May was behind bars, the Kissimmee Police Department towed his car and auctioned it off. He lost his job and was evicted. Now May is suing the city for false arrest and false imprisonment. He wants to be compensated for the loss of his car and job.

May's attorney and the city of Kissimmee discussed a possible settlement last year, but failed to reach an agreement.

CR

Zim
08-22-2009, 00:36
Hmmm...comment on the first page. He may have a good lawsuit if the officer lied, but it looks like it was his lack of driving ability that landed him in jail for months and "ruined" his life.

Don't know how they do such things in Florida but you'd have to work pretty hard here to rack up driving offenses so as to get your license suspended 5 years.

"Also, Mr MAy forgot to mention that he sat in jail for three months because the bond for Habitual traffic violator back then was 10k, and he could not get bonded out. Prisoners are not held in jail until test results come back, May just simply could not get bonded out. The police do not auction off cars towed from arrests, the tow company does that. And if you wondering Habitual traffic violator means his driving record was so bad, that his license is suspended for 5 years. Consequently, dirtbags are always looking for a free lunch"

Also, in the spirit of the thread, another link of officers acting inappropriately (and pretty stupidly, I might add).

http://news.aol.com/article/midland-county-sheriff-deputies-in/632950?icid=main|htmlws-main|dl1|link4|http%3A%2F%2Fnews.aol.com%2Farticle %2Fmidland-county-sheriff-deputies-in%2F632950

Interestingly, that story above was deemed important enough to make the first page of the news site I check, but I don't remember seeing this one below. Then again, it's just old enough that I may have forgotten or missed it.

http://news.aol.com/article/2-okla-sheriffs-deputies-shot-killed/588980?icid=sphere_newsaol_inpage

Mooks
08-23-2009, 01:00
Hmmm...comment on the first page. He may have a good lawsuit if the officer lied, but it looks like it was his lack of driving ability that landed him in jail for months and "ruined" his life.

Don't know how they do such things in Florida but you'd have to work pretty hard here to rack up driving offenses so as to get your license suspended 5 years.

"Also, Mr MAy forgot to mention that he sat in jail for three months because the bond for Habitual traffic violator back then was 10k, and he could not get bonded out. Prisoners are not held in jail until test results come back, May just simply could not get bonded out. The police do not auction off cars towed from arrests, the tow company does that. And if you wondering Habitual traffic violator means his driving record was so bad, that his license is suspended for 5 years. Consequently, dirtbags are always looking for a free lunch"

Also, in the spirit of the thread, another link of officers acting inappropriately (and pretty stupidly, I might add).

http://news.aol.com/article/midland-county-sheriff-deputies-in/632950?icid=main|htmlws-main|dl1|link4|http%3A%2F%2Fnews.aol.com%2Farticle %2Fmidland-county-sheriff-deputies-in%2F632950

Interestingly, that story above was deemed important enough to make the first page of the news site I check, but I don't remember seeing this one below. Then again, it's just old enough that I may have forgotten or missed it.

http://news.aol.com/article/2-okla-sheriffs-deputies-shot-killed/588980?icid=sphere_newsaol_inpage

Iv gotta say, those 2 links were nowhere near the "spirit of the thread". Iv doubt you read anything but maybe the last page.

The first link; a hot chick on a car posing with a officer's m4 (I think its a m4, not sure). Big deal, victimless crime and noone really cares.

2nd one, murder of 2 cops by a guy. Sure, its bad. But nowhere near what this topic has been about.

Zim
08-23-2009, 08:11
I've read the thread from the very first post. I especially enjoyed the bit about fascism pills.

I find the thread on the whole to be a rather interesting mix of some apparently real and shocking abuses of power by law enforcement as well as stories that seem either weak on fact checking or deliberately misrepresenting events.

I posted mainly to mention that a recent link might (I reserve judgment at the moment) be the latter rather than the former. The links I posted were done more on a whim. The former because I thought it was funny (while also being an abuse of the public trust by officers), and the latter because I never saw it on the front page of my news link while the former was, and that made me sad.

The links are more closely related to the topic of the thread than one would think from their first glance, however. In the first we have officers in a marked car stopping at a restaurant that appears to be similar to Hooters (something that could result in discipline in and of itself due to the marked car), drinking "three to five beers" each, and then handing a waitress a duty weapon that may have been loaded (unless they bothered to empty the magazine beforehand) to pose for a picture.

At the very least it's a worse abuse than the supposed one in the link posted earlier where a cop was beat in the head with a flashlight and tased the person in response. At the most it's indicative of the attitude some officers get that they can do anything they want and don't have standards to live up to due to their oath, the same attitude that can lead to further and more severe abuses.

The second link provides a contrast to the almost constantly negative posts in the thread. Reading a thread devoted to one side of a certain subject (in this case, polic abuses) it can be easy to only see that side. It doesn't hurt to remember that these are people who put their lives in danger to keep people safe, and from time to time they pay the ultimate price as a result of fulfilling their duties.

It also helps to show part of the reason cops can seem to be so paranoid or overreact in the name of safety, a subject that has been brought up in the thread before. The job is dangerous. Sometimes we have some idea ahead of time like this particular story. Sometimes it turns out to be the guy an officer pulls over for not having tail lights who gets out of the car and starts shooting (or does so halfway through what seemed a routine encounter).


Iv gotta say, those 2 links were nowhere near the "spirit of the thread". Iv doubt you read anything but maybe the last page.

The first link; a hot chick on a car posing with a officer's m4 (I think its a m4, not sure). Big deal, victimless crime and noone really cares.

2nd one, murder of 2 cops by a guy. Sure, its bad. But nowhere near what this topic has been about.

Vladimir
08-24-2009, 17:04
A cop lies his pants off (http://www.wftv.com/irresistible/20435114/detail.html) - no, wait, he's unlikely to be punished so he's not lying anything off. Anyways, a cop lies strenuously about a man he pulled over who was chewing breath mints. The cop thought the mints the driver was chewing was crack. The cop says his field test kit returned a positive, which is possible, as those things are terribly unreliable. So he arrested the guy and had him put into jail.

But the cop also said that he say the guy buying crack and that the driver admitted he bought drugs. this jives with the fact that three months after the arrest the substance came back from the lab as certified non-crack.

But during that time the driver couldn't make bail and had to stay in jail, losing his apartment, his job, and his car, which the police impounded and sold. I wonder if the cop feels bad about that. Since he lied so much, I'm guessing that sort of thing doesn't phase him.

KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- A man is suing the Kissimmee Police Department for an arrest over mints. When officers pulled Donald May over for an expired tag, they thought the mints he was chewing were crack and arrested him.

May told Eyewitness News they wouldn't let him out of jail for three months until tests proved the so-called drugs were candy.

May said he was just minding his business, driving home from work, when a Kissimmee police officer pulled him over near 192.

"I don't know how it occurred," he said.

May was pulled over for an expired tag on his car. When the officer walked up to him, he noticed something white in May's mouth. May said it was breath mints, but the officer thought it was crack cocaine.

"He took them out of my mouth and put them in a baggy and locked me up [for] possession of cocaine and tampering with evidence," May explained.

The officer claimed he field-tested the evidence and it tested positive for drugs. The officer said he saw May buying drugs while he was stopped at an intersection. He also stated in his report May waived his Miranda rights and voluntarily admitted to buying drugs.

May said that never happened.

"My client never admitted he purchased crack cocaine. Why would he say that?" attorney Adam Sudbury said.

May was thrown in jail and was unable to bond out for three months. He didn't get out until he received a letter from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the State Attorney's Office that test results showed no drugs were found.

"While I was sitting in jail I lost my apartment. I lost everything," he said.

While May was behind bars, the Kissimmee Police Department towed his car and auctioned it off. He lost his job and was evicted. Now May is suing the city for false arrest and false imprisonment. He wants to be compensated for the loss of his car and job.

May's attorney and the city of Kissimmee discussed a possible settlement last year, but failed to reach an agreement.

CR

*audible sigh*

Clearly he's lying. He has a badge; unlike the poor, innocent victim. Let's just ignore the results of the initial drug test. The cop in question likely has a video of him buying "teh crank."

Xiahou
08-24-2009, 20:03
*audible sigh*

Clearly he's lying. He has a badge; unlike the poor, innocent victim. Let's just ignore the results of the initial drug test. The cop in question likely has a video of him buying "teh crank."Well, for what it's worth, a little further reading indicated the cop in question no longer works on the force and the victims attorney can't find him to serve him notice of the pending lawsuit.


May’s attorney said a federal civil suit was filed three months ago against the city. They are looking for Rice, to serve him a summons.

A police spokeswoman said any comments on lawsuits have to come from the city attorney, but confirmed that Officer Eric Rice no longer works for the Kissimmee Police Department. linky (http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/osceola_news/081809_Man_sues_city_over_wrongful_arrest)

I'd hate to jump to conclusions, but that doesn't sound very good for the officer in question....

Crazed Rabbit
08-24-2009, 20:44
*audible sigh*

Clearly he's lying. He has a badge; unlike the poor, innocent victim. Let's just ignore the results of the initial drug test. The cop in question likely has a video of him buying "teh crank."

He said he saw the driver buying crack and admitting he had crack. Considering all he had was breath mints, I find that hard to believe.

I may have been quite wrong about him not being punished, which would be refreshing.

CR

InsaneApache
08-29-2009, 09:34
A blind man who complained to police about cars parking on a pavement was arrested when he threatened to let down the vehicles' tyres.

Daniel Duckfield, from Narberth, Pembrokeshire, said he and his guide dog had to walk in the road when paths were blocked by illegally-parked cars.

He has complained about being cautioned and put in a cell after his arrest.

Dyfed-Powys Police said it was investigating Mr Duckfield's complaints.

Mr Duckfield, who became blind in December 1999, claimed police were not doing enough to tackle motorists parking illegally on pavements near his home.

He said he had repeatedly complained to officers about cars blocking his path when he went out of his house, forcing him and his guide dog to walk on a main road.

Last week, after phoning officers and feeling he was getting no help, he went a step further.

He said: "I said all right, if you're not going to do anything I'll do something myself, I'll let the tyres down and I'll write 'no parking' on the windscreen.

"I went to the door [and] locked the door. By the time I got 50 yards down my street there was a policeman running towards me.

"He told me he was going to arrest me because I had threatened to let tyres down and threatened to write on windscreens."

Mr Duckfield said he was taken to a police station and held in a cell before being cautioned.

He said: "I thought it was absolutely disgusting. I came back here and I sat down and I almost cried but I thought, no, the temper took over me."

Mr Duckfield said the arrest meant he would no longer be asked to visit schools with his guide dog.

Dyfed-Powys Police said the force had held a crackdown on illegal parking in Narberth last month.

A spokesperson added: "It is unfortunate Mr Duckfield decided to take matters into his own hands on this occasion."

The spokesperson added Mr Duckfield's complaints would be fully investigated.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west/8225778.stm

What a shower of bastards. :no:

Zim
08-30-2009, 21:30
It seems kind of overboard to stick him in a cell for for even a short period for what was most likely just venting. That said, here where I live you could theoretically arrest someone for making a threat like that as opposed to the people committing the parking violations (ticket at most), even though it would seem to show very bad judgment from the info in the article. Apparently that also holds true in the part of Wales this incident took place in.

What is "parking on a pavement "? Parking on the sidewalk?

The local police department here does crackdowns on minor traffic and parking violations periodically and all they get for it are tons of complaints (and likely newspaper articles about how they write tickets just to create revenue over petty things). Then if they relax at all or focus more on crimes they get almost as many complaints (and likely newspaper articles about how they don't care about people's safety because they aren't writing tickets for those same "petty" things).

Sometimes I'm glad my department is so overstretched that the volunteers handle stuff like parking tickets.

Crazed Rabbit
09-03-2009, 21:15
In Georgia, cops murder a Pastor (http://www.ajc.com/news/family-seeks-answers-after-129819.html)who wasn't even the target of their drug investigation, but had dropped off a woman suspected of using drugs beforehand. They decide to 'question' him by waiting until he went into a gas station to use the ATM to withdraw money, then speed up to him in a black unmarked pickup as he comes out, then jump out with guns drawn in plain cloths. Naturally, he gets scared at seeing gunmen approaching him, so he backs up quickly, hitting one officer. As he drives away they shoot at him. He died a little while later from bullet wounds. The cops claimed they yelled "Police" which, of course, no criminal is physically able to do. And they did all this shooting right in the center of a gas station - you know, surrounded by huge amounts of explosive liquid.

He's survived by his pregnant wife.

Video here. (http://www.wneg32.tv/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1490:surveillance-video-shows-moments-before-shooting&catid=1:latest-news&Itemid=18)

They could have avoiding murdering him if they had simply driven up calmly, parked, gotten out without guns in their hands and shown him their badges. But then they couldn't pretend to be cool badasses. And what's a few dead innocents compared to that?

CR

Crazed Rabbit
09-04-2009, 18:18
JERICHO, Ark. – It was just too much, having to return to court twice on the same day to contest yet another traffic ticket, and Fire Chief Don Payne didn't hesitate to tell the judge what he thought of the police and their speed traps.

The response from cops? They shot him. Right there in court.
...
It was anger over traffic tickets that brought Payne to city hall last week, said his lawyer, Randy Fishman. After Payne failed to get a traffic ticket dismissed on Aug. 27, police gave Payne or his son another ticket that day. Payne, 39, returned to court to vent his anger to Judge Tonya Alexander, Fishman said.

It's unclear exactly what happened next, but Martin said an argument between Payne and the seven police officers who attended the hearing apparently escalated to a scuffle, ending when an officer shot Payne from behind.

Doctors in Memphis, Tenn., removed a .40-caliber bullet from Payne's hip bone, Martin said. Another officer suffered a grazing wound to his finger from the bullet.

Martin declined to name the officer who shot Payne. It's unclear if the officer has been disciplined.

Prosecutor Lindsey Fairley said Thursday that he didn't plan to file any felony charges against the officer or Payne. Fairley, reached at his home, said Payne could face a misdemeanor charge stemming from the scuffle, but that would be up to the city's judge. He said he didn't remember the name of the officer who fired the shot.

So, you shoot an unarmed man in the back (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090903/ap_on_re_us/us_shot_in_court) and he's the only one even possibly facing charges? :dizzy2:

CR

Crazed Rabbit
09-18-2009, 17:30
Earlier in this thread, a video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvF9Kpwuxh0&feature=player_embedded) was posted of a cop interrogating a woman. The cop proceeded to turn the camera off, and when it came back on, the woman was lying on the floor with a pool of blood around her face. (http://jonathanturley.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/angela-garbarino.jpeg) (Disturbing picture!)

The cop was fired, for not administering first aid, but not prosecuted. And guess what?

He's back on the job!
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/article/20090813/NEWS03/908130319

A Shreveport police officer who was fired for violating departmental policy while arresting Angela Garbarino on Nov. 17, 2007, has been reinstated.
Advertisement

The Shreveport Municipal Fire and Police Civil Service Board's seven members made the ruling Wednesday in the case known nationally for video footage of the handcuffed woman lying in a pool of her blood in a police interrogation room.

The ruling means Wiley Willis can return to duty once his in-service and firearm requirements are met.

"He'll get a year and a half of back pay, benefits, retirement, everything," said Michael Carter, president of the Shreveport police officers union. And as far as he knows, Carter added, Willis intends to continue working for the Shreveport Police Department.

The Civil Service Board ruled that Willis' rights, under the Police Officer Bill of Rights, were violated because an expert failed to record a polygraph examination Willis took as part of the Police Department's investigation into Garbarino's injuries, including a broken nose.

:shame:

CR

Zim
09-20-2009, 13:13
That's some disturbing stuff CR, and pretty disheartening from where I stand. I can't say anything about the pastor, except that maybe the plain clothes cops didn't know he was a likely innocent and for some reason chose to stop him without a uniformed officer present (with a marked car),. That said, once he ran one over I can see why the others shot at him, despite the fact that they may have created the unfortunate incident by not having a uniformed officer do the stop (not required but often a good idea).

The Jericho Police Department was disbanded over that incident if I recall correctly. Creepy stuff but you do see weird things in very small departments in little towns. I don't like it but local government often allows for things you wouldn't see in big cities (not an excuse, just a suggestion that this may be an isolated occurrence. If anything in most cities I'd see giving too much leeway to other department of public safety employees as the problem rather than shooting at them..).

I have nothing to say to the last post. I can see where it may be overblown, and also where such an incident may be a miscarriage of justice. The polygraph thing seems weird, since most police officers think they're worthless (and the Supreme Court has decided they aren't reliable enough to be used as evidence).

Major Robert Dump
09-23-2009, 03:51
All I can say about the cops, the pastor and the gas station is...bravo, bravo

Drug War Fail, Jack Boot Thugs for Teh Win

Crazed Rabbit
09-23-2009, 17:16
A Pittsburgh cop got drunk, then assaulted and shot a random passerby after he left a bar. And he's now back on the job! (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09246/995190-53.stm)


According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court, Kaleb Miller was walking on Sidney Street on the South Side about 2:10 a.m. on June 28, 2008, when he saw Officer Abel, an off-duty Zone 3 police officer. He had a gun in his hand and was "yelling unintelligibly and was visibly intoxicated."

The officer, who testified at his trial that he had been assaulted at a stop light when he left a bar that morning, believed Mr. Miller was the person who struck him.

According to the lawsuit, Officer Abel got into a car, did a U-turn onto 20th Street and stopped 10 feet in front of Mr. Miller. Officer Abel then grabbed Mr. Miller by the shirt and ordered him to the ground, it continued.

"Defendant Abel then pushed the barrel of his pistol into the left eye and face cheek of plaintiff, at which point plaintiff began to go to the ground as ordered by defendant Abel," the lawsuit said.

Mr. Abel then began to hit Mr. Miller in the back of the head with the gun, the suit continued. Trying to protect himself, Mr. Miller put his right hand over the back of his head and was shot in the hand.

"After plaintiff suffered the right hand gunshot wound, he fell to the ground on his right side, at which point plaintiff viewed defendant Abel seated on the sidewalk, twirling his pistol," the complaint said.

Two uniformed officers arrived and said that Mr. Miller was under arrest. Later, however, after they realized he had not assaulted Officer Abel, he was released and taken to the hospital for treatment.

Officer Paul G. Abel Jr. was found not guilty of criminal charges -- including aggravated assault -- by Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge Jeffrey Manning in June. He was reinstated to his position through arbitration last week.

Gee, I wonder what would happen if I got really drunk and hit and shot the first person I saw in the street? And ain't it great to know what kind of men they let stay on the police force?

CR

Banquo's Ghost
09-24-2009, 07:51
It's difficult to see the rights or wrongs of that story CR, because there isn't much information in the article. Firstly, however, the officer was acquitted. That means he is innocent, and an innocent man should not be punished.

The judge's reported comments however, indicate that there may have been something to the allegations - although Mr Miller also appears to have a history of complaints.

But the fact remains, the policeman was acquitted of charges which on first reading, if true, should have had him convicted.

Major Robert Dump
09-24-2009, 08:29
It's difficult to see the rights or wrongs of that story CR, because there isn't much information in the article. Firstly, however, the office was acquitted. That means he is innocent, and an innocent man should not be punished.

The judge's reported comments however, indicate that there may have been something to the allegations - although Mr Miller also appears to have a history of complaints.

But the fact remains, the policeman was acquitted of charges which on first reading, if true, should have had him convicted.

Regardless of the facts involved and the specifics of his acquittal on the specific charges.....he was drunk with a gun. That alone should be enough to make him not a cop anymore. You don't take guns into bars.....not anyone, not me not cops not anyone

Major Robert Dump
09-24-2009, 08:31
Your tax dollars at work:

Drug raid lasts nine hours, due in part to cops playing Wii

http://blogs.kansascity.com/crime_scene/2009/09/fla-police-play-nintendo-wii-during-drug-raid.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/09/22/police-play-wii-bowling-d_n_294405.html

Banquo's Ghost
09-24-2009, 18:04
Regardless of the facts involved and the specifics of his acquittal on the specific charges.....he was drunk with a gun. That alone should be enough to make him not a cop anymore. You don't take guns into bars.....not anyone, not me not cops not anyone

You may have better sources, or I may not have read the article properly, but it is the plaintiff's lawsuit that alleges he was drunk with a gun. It appears the officer was acquitted of this.

I would agree that if this policeman was in fact drunk with a gun, he should be fired and imprisoned. But not on the basis of a lawsuit - on the basis of a conviction in a court of law because a man is innocent until proven guilty. (Not a concept very popular these days, I'm aware, but still the foundation of Anglo-Saxon law).

Crazed Rabbit
09-28-2009, 19:08
The officer was acquitted of aggravated assault. It's a fact that the victim was shot, but not charged with anything. Given how bad cops are likely to charge you for resisting arrest if their fist hurts after they punch you in the face, it's a sign of how in the wrong the cop was that the victim didn't get charged.

Another abuse-in-waiting, though not as bad as many listed here, as a police chief tries to quash online anti-police comments (http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/2009/09/18/0918comments.html):

Police ready to 'take on' commenters, chief says
People who misrepresent themselves as officials in online comments could face civil, criminal penalties, Acevedo says.
Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo says he and some of his officers have been harassed, lied about and had their identities falsely used in online blogs and in reader comment sections on local media Internet sites.

They've had enough.

In a meeting this month with department brass, Acevedo and the group discussed how they think such posts erode public trust in the department and how they have been wrongly maligned.

They have since researched their legal options and decided that from now on, they might launch formal investigations into such posts, Acevedo said. He said investigators might seek search warrants or subpoenas from judges to learn the identities of the authors — he thinks some could be department employees — and possibly sue them for libel or file charges if investigators think a crime was committed.

"A lot of my people feel it is time to take these people on," Acevedo said. "They understand the damage to the organization, and quite frankly, when people are willfully misleading and lying, they are pretty much cowards anyway because they are doing so under the cloak of anonymity."

The effort to crack down on potentially illegal statements or comments that are possibly libelous — those published with the goal of defaming a person — is the second time in recent months that the department has confronted new social media.

It's the comments that are priceless, though;

i think the police should taser and gas every person who does not bow down and submit to their will. i mean just tear gas them into submission. the scum do not deserve an opinion. all heil the great Art Avacado. May he control Austin first, then Texas..soon all of america shall worship him. Avacado! Avacado! I can hear the chants now. You could become..a god


I didn't really mean any of that stuff up there in the article. I was just a little worked up. After I went and got my daily oil massage down at the gay bath house, I felt a lot better. Now I realize that people have a 1st Amendment right to criticize public figures and that satire is a protected form of speech. My lawyer also told me that if I ever attempted to prosecute someone for libel I would be hard pressed to find any damages since I have no reputation to ruin. He said if I would be laughed out of court for filing a claim against satirists. (Kind of like Tina Fey posing as Sarah Palin isn't something that Palin can sue for).

And even one for Lemur:

Why isn't Art Acevedo denying the rumor that he likes to attend a gay bath house and get oil massages by other men? Also, why won't he deny the claim I've heard that he helped Glenn Beck avoid being charged for the rape and murder of a young woman back in 1990? I mean at first I didn't believe those claims, but since Art won't deny them, it is really starting to look bad for him and likely rapist Glenn Beck. What is Art trying to hide?

CR

Banquo's Ghost
09-29-2009, 08:01
Of course, if our US colleagues despair of police that are too keen, they might wish to reflect on the inestimable joys of police that are not remotely interested in crime (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/6241098/Police-failed-mother-and-daughter-who-burned-to-death-in-car.html). Trying to get a British copper to do anything but paperwork (or occasionally execute innocent Brazilian commuters for a diversion) is, sadly, a lost art.


Chris Grayling, the shadow home secretary, said the tragedy highlighted the widespread failure of the Government’s policy on tackling anti-social behaviour.

He pointed to the “shocking” claim by a senior officer who gave evidence at the inquest that it was no longer the police’s responsibility to deal with “low level” hooliganism and abuse.

...

A gang of 16 youths regularly congregated outside their home in Barwell, Leics, to hurl missiles at the house, shout verbal abuse and urinate on the walls. Miss Pilkington’s son, Anthony, 19, was held at knifepoint and locked in a shed by the gang. Despite her repeated pleas to police and the council, Miss Pilkington was told there was little the authorities could do to prosecute the gang. Unable to carry on, she killed herself and her daughter by setting fire to their Austin Maestro in October 2007. Yesterday, as an inquest jury returned verdicts of suicide and unlawful killing, the jurors at Loughborough Town Hall decided that the police’s failure to respond to the family’s pleas for help contributed to their deaths.

Somehow, the thought of SWAT teams bursting into these little thugs' squalid home and gunning them down like dogs has a certain appeal.

InsaneApache
09-29-2009, 10:36
Oh the coppers in the UK gave up catching villians long ago. 'Elf and safety. They don't persue miscreants in case the little dear trips over and grazes his knee. Then the full weight of 'elf and safety and 'uman rights comes into play. Forget about them chasing the toerag who's just pinched your shiny bright new motorbike, because he won't be wearing a helmet and the little mis-understood sweetie might possibly fall off and sue you, the police, the council and the highways agency.

Somewhere back in this thread is an account of the experience I had last summer with the rozzers. The one where I was threatened with arrest because I was going to take a photo of the troglodytes who were throwing bricks at my wifes head. How very dare I stand up for myself.

Drive down the street at 31 MPH in a 30 MPH zone though and you will get a ticket and 3 penalty points on your licence. Do you smoke? Well if you do, don't you dare light up in a pub. If you do you will be fined, on the spot. And don't think you can get away with discarding your fag 'cos if you do you will be fined for littering, on the spot.

Fancy taking the neighbours kids to the local baths? Oh no you don't. You need to be 'processed' to make sure your not a pedo, 'cos let's face it, they're everywhere. If you do not comply, you will be fined and possibly imprisoned. Never mind then, we won't go to the baths, we'll stay at home and bake some cakes. Oh no you don't. If you do you will need to undergo government training, costs hundreds of pounds but if you do not obey, you will be fined for being an illegal childminder.

Still all is not lost. You can employ an illegal immigrant and get away with it. But only if your a member of the government. If you're not, then you will be fined and possibly sent to gaol.

New Labour. New Britain.

Louis VI the Fat
09-29-2009, 13:30
Now that the thread has turned into self-flagellation mode...


Don't forget that the French police operates differently. There is police, and there is gendarmerie. The first are what people from civilized countries expect they are. The latter are a bit more peculiar.

The police are part of the ministry of the interior. The gendarmerie however are part of the ministry of defense. However, they do have police authority over ninety percent of the country and half the population. But...they are an army. 125,000 of them, many of which permanently reside in military barracks. Regiments are moved back and forth between war zones in Africa and Bosnia to police functioning in French suburbs.
(Or is that policing in Bosnia and war zones in Africa and Paris suburbs?)

The use of the military to perform policing functions over a civilian population is a semi-fascist peculiarity that is common in Latin countries.
(Spain's dreaded Guardia Civil - forever in civil war with the civilian population.
The outright fascist Latin American military police, where there is not a single police training school or barracks without a cellar underneath it that in recent history served as a torture centre for the amusement of the military police)


At long last, in the past two decades the gendarmerie has been and is being tamed. However, I'll still take those British bobbies any time of the week.

lars573
09-29-2009, 23:56
Canada also has a Gendarmerie. Le Gendarmerie royale du Canada, or Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It has the status of a Dragoon regiment in the army.

Husar
09-30-2009, 11:47
Canada also has a Gendarmerie. Le Gendarmerie royale du Canada, or Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It has the status of a Dragoon regiment in the army.

Do they have a garrison bonus?

lars573
10-02-2009, 22:26
Only in the province they were raised.

Crazed Rabbit
10-15-2009, 09:14
Remember the Oklahoma State Trooper who pulled over an ambulance with a patient because they didn't yield fast enough and he has a rage problem? And he then proceeded to choke the EMT after finding out about the patient? And then he only got a paid vacation for a week?

Well badge number 606, Daniel Martin (http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=11&articleid=20091006_12_A1_HOLDEN249205&archive=yes), is again in the news after hitting a man with a baton during a traffic stop because:

James said Douglas was arrested and the officers had to use force because they felt he was getting hostile.

"He had his teeth clenched as if he was going to do something," the attorney quoted his client as saying.


Clenched teeth! Goodness! That criminal is lucky he escaped with only a beating. And did I mention the person beaten and arrested wasn't the driver or even in the car that had allegedly run a stop sign. He was trying to walk past the car the police had pulled over into a driveway to the house, and charged with obstructing an officer.

HOLDENVILLE — A state trooper suspended in July following a scuffle with a paramedic is again the focus of an internal investigation by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol.

Trooper Daniel Martin was put on paid administrative leave after an arrest Saturday in which a Holdenville man claimed he was assaulted by troopers for no apparent reason.

Martin was suspended without pay for five days in July as a result of a widely publicized scuffle he had with a Creek Nation paramedic at Paden on May 24.

Parts of the scuffle were captured on video taken at the scene and from the dashboard camera in the trooper's car.

In addition to being suspended, Martin was ordered to undergo anger-management assessment.

In Saturday's incident, Martin was the backup officer for Trooper Tommy Allen, who was also placed on paid administrative leave over the Holdenville arrest. Holdenville is in Hughes County, about 90 miles south of Tulsa.

Capt. Chris West, spokesman for the OHP, said Monday a complaint was filed Sunday in connection with the Holdenville arrest a day earlier.

The two troopers were placed on administrative leave based on the complaint and the fact Martin was involved in another high-profile case, West said.

West, noting that
the case is being investigated by the OHP's internal affairs unit, would not comment on the details, except to say that an individual was arrested for obstructing an officer at a traffic stop of another man for a stop-sign violation.

The arrested man has been identified as Kristopher Douglas, 28, who was taken by the troopers to the Hughes County Jail.

Witness account
Jerry Ford, who lives in the house where the arrest occurred, said Douglas was walking to his house to help him with drywall when the troopers jumped Douglas, put him in a chokehold and hit him with a baton. He said the incident occurred in his front yard.

Ford said the motorist who allegedly ran the stop sign, Luke Carson, also was coming to his house to help him with drywall.

According to Ford, Carson pulled into his driveway about 7 p.m., and behind him were the two troopers, Allen followed by Martin.

Ford said Douglas, who was not involved in the traffic stop, was trying to get to Ford's house, but the officers kept insisting that he stand by the street.

Suddenly, Allen grabbed Douglas' arm and put him in a chokehold and Martin pulled out a retractable baton and struck him in the back, Ford said.

"I came out and asked what was going on," Ford said. "Martin comes up in a fast walk, screaming he's going to put me in jail."

"All I asked was that they take it to the street, that they were upsetting my two kids," Ford said.

Ford said he bailed Douglas out of jail about 90 minutes after the arrest. They tried to file a complaint with OHP that night, but were told they would have to wait until Monday, he said.

Ford said they contacted an Oklahoma City television station on Sunday to report the matter.

Ford said neither he nor Douglas knew the names of the troopers, but they remembered badge No. 606 and reported that to the TV reporter, who recognized it as being Martin's.

Once that story aired Sunday night, Douglas said he received a call "inside of 10 minutes" from the OHP, telling them that he could file the complaint, which he did verbally Sunday night. Ford said a written complaint will also be filed.

Ford said he was surprised to learn that Martin was the same trooper involved in the scuffle with the paramedic.

"Anyone in the United States of America would get run off his job," Ford said. "He (Martin) gets a paid vacation. I don't want to run down the police, but we sure need someone to monitor the police, but no one is above the Highway Patrol.

"It's like now, nothing would have been done had it not been for the media coverage," Ford said.

The Tulsa World has filed a formal request under the Oklahoma Open Records Act for release of the troopers' incident reports, a copy of the complaint and release of dashboard videotapes from the troopers' cars. None was released Monday.

Trooper's version
Gary James, an Oklahoma City attorney who represents Martin, said his client will be exonerated once the tapes from Martin's dashboard camera are released.

James said he talked with Martin, who told him that Douglas tried to walk through the traffic stop several times and wouldn't heed their commands to stand by the street.

James said Douglas was arrested and the officers had to use force because they felt he was getting hostile.

"He had his teeth clenched as if he was going to do something," the attorney quoted his client as saying.

James said Douglas could be heard in the squad car saying he was sorry and should have heeded the troopers' command.

Records show that in addition to several traffic tickets, Douglas has 2004 felony drug conviction out of Oklahoma County, for which he received a nearly five-year suspended sentence.

Lawyer speaks
Richard O'Carroll, a Tulsa attorney representing Douglas, backed Ford's version of the events. O'Carroll is also the attorney for Maurice White Jr., the paramedic involved in the scuffle with Martin in May.

That incident was sparked when Martin claimed the ambulance crew, which was taking a woman to the hospital, gave him an obscene finger gesture as their vehicles passed.

O'Carroll has already filed a federal lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Muskogee against the state for that incident.

Reacting to the latest case involving Martin, O'Carroll said of the Highway Patrol: "This was predictable and outrageous. They've protected, indulged and endorsed this dangerous law-enforcement officer."

That's right; the guy was trying to walk past the cops. But they don't want him walking there, and say he's acting nervous or something, so they beat him and arrest him. Gee, I wonder why he was nervous. Maybe because the cop is a frickin' psychopath.


Oh, he's another stunner (with video): (http://wcbstv.com/national/caught.on.tape.2.1232899.html)
This cop was stationed in a school. These cops are generally around to keep the peace, act as a liaison, simple stuff. And this is a special education school, where kids with learning disabilities are supposed to get help.

So we have one fifteen year old boy who's at the school and doesn't have his shirt tucked in. This cop sees it and starts yelling and swearing at him. The kid starts tucking his shirt in as he continues walking down the hallway.

That's not good enough for the cop, who shoves the kid into the wall, punches him, throws him, face first, on the floor, and continues punching him. In the end the kid has his face bruised and his nose broken.

BY A COP SUPPOSED TO BE PROTECTING HIM.
DOLTON, Ill. (CBS) ―

[Click to zoom.]
A 15-year-old student was walking down a hallway at school when he says a police officer grabbed him and threw him to the ground. But that's not all. The teenager says he was beaten and nearly suffocated. He told his story to CBS station WBBM-TV in Chicago.

Security cameras captured the beating of a 15-year-old Special Education student by a police officer. Marshawn Pitts says the officer started shouting and swearing at him because his shirt wasn't tucked in.

"I was tucking my shirt in," Pitts said.

But it's what happened next that had Marshawn Pitts worried for his life. Pitts says the officer came at him suddenly.

"It was just like boom," Pitts said.

He says he was blindsided by the officer, thrown into lockers and struck repeatedly.

In the video, you can see that he gets slammed to the ground and his face smashed into the floor. His nose was broken.

Pitts says he was bleeding.

"All this on the outside of my mouth was busted," he said.

He calls this treatment violent and unnecessary, especially considering he was attending the Academy for Learning High School in Dolton for students like him with Special Education needs.

When he was younger, he suffered a brain injury and now has a learning disability.

The school for special needs was supposed to help him and understand his situation.

"Yeah, but instead I got beaten on by police," Pitts said.

Ed Manzke is Pitts' attorney.

"The officer was in his face because he didn't have his shirt tucked in," Manzke said. "That's the officer put in that school to protect these kids, and instead of doing that, this officer is literally assaulting this kid."

The officer in question was a Dolton police officer, and the hold he used on Pitts can be a dangerous one.

Zena Naiditch of Equip for Equality, a legal advocacy group that fights for the rights of people with disabilities, looked at the video and said the type of physical restraint used by the officer has killed students.

"It's called a face-down take-down, and kids and adults often die because they can't breathe," Naiditch said.

A Government Accounting Office report released in May, just one day before the officer's use of the hold on Pitts, found face-down take-downs led to at least 20 deaths nationwide.

Currently eight states prohibit the use of this hold. Illinois is not one of them.

"So we don't actually know how common these incidents are, and that's outrageous," Naiditch said.

Pitts says he was terrified and begged the officer to stop.

"I couldn't breathe,'" Pitts said. "I was like, 'let me up.'"

Naiditch says it shouldn't have happened.

"He's getting a beating, and he's getting a beating on an issue that has nothing to do with danger, it has to do with dress code," Naiditch said.

No one from the Academy of Learning in Dolton would talk to WBBM-TV about the alleged abuse.

The Dolton Police Department and the Mayor of Dolton did not return phone calls.

Marshawn Pitts's attorney Ed Manzke says he has transferred to another school and is planning to file a lawsuit.

The State Board of Education says no one from the school reported the use of forceful restraint to them.
And in that article, the PD didn't return any phone calls. I wonder why...

Perhaps it's because the cop in question, Christopher Lloyd, shot his ex-wife's husband to death in front of the husband's home back in February 2008. A police investigation found it was in self defense. An autopsy found the husband had been shot 24 times. As in, there weren't 24 bullets shot, but 24 bullets entered the victim, who, if we trust the Chicago police because we are raging morons, attacked an armed cop outside his own home.

And so Lloyd faced the harsh penalty of being fired before finding work in Dolton as a police officer.

BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE!

The reason the PD didn't return those phone calls may have been because....
The cop was in jail for raping a woman.

Yes, that's right. (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-dolton-cop-09-oct09,0,527689.story) He held a pillow over her head and threatened her with a knife.

It appears the rape charge may finally be the one that lands him in prison. I guess it's hard to claim raping a woman was necessary because she was 'resisting arrest'. But I'm sure top union officials are working on that now, seeing as how the police defending murder and assault before.

CR

Samurai Waki
10-15-2009, 10:52
I'm not buying the "he was shot this many times" argument so much anymore, after having witnessed police training, Officers are trained to keep firing until there aren't any bullets left to fire. However, having that said, the rest of the case is suspicious at best, heinous at worst.

Husar
10-15-2009, 13:25
I'm not buying the "he was shot this many times" argument so much anymore, after having witnessed police training, Officers are trained to keep firing until there aren't any bullets left to fire. However, having that said, the rest of the case is suspicious at best, heinous at worst.

What kind of weapon did he use then? I don't know of any pistol with a 24+ round magazine. I don't really see the use of firing 9 or 12 rounds into someone and then pumping another one or two magazines into their dead body, what kind of police training is that? :inquisitive:

Meneldil
10-15-2009, 15:04
Scary.

Crazed Rabbit
10-15-2009, 16:31
I'm not buying the "he was shot this many times" argument so much anymore, after having witnessed police training, Officers are trained to keep firing until there aren't any bullets left to fire. However, having that said, the rest of the case is suspicious at best, heinous at worst.

What Husar said. 24 bullets into the guy likely means at least two magazines, as they are few 24 round plus magazines, and even fewer used by police. Two magazines means the cop shot the guy multiple times, then reloaded and continued shooting.

And those are just the bullets that hit the guy; it's likely some missed, unless the cop was very close.

CR

Samurai Waki
10-15-2009, 22:24
What Husar said. 24 bullets into the guy likely means at least two magazines, as they are few 24 round plus magazines, and even fewer used by police. Two magazines means the cop shot the guy multiple times, then reloaded and continued shooting.

And those are just the bullets that hit the guy; it's likely some missed, unless the cop was very close.

CR

I don't know, unless you had a good restructuring of the crime scene, it's hard to tell. This man's character is certainly lacking, and the numerous violations he's been caught with doesn't give him the benefit of the doubt as far as I'm concerned, however, as a general rule the x factor of shots being fired, doesn't necessarily equate to willful malice. The fact that he shot his ex wife's husband to death, if it can be made certain he wasn't in danger for his life, does however. And then of course the rape charge really doesn't swing things in his favor.

Major Robert Dump
10-21-2009, 08:28
LOL he shot an unarmed man 24 times in the man's front yard while his children watched. This was not self defense, this was murder.

The douchebag probably showed up to hassle his ex wife and her new husband came outside and told him to get the hell off his property.

What's sad is that the cop's dad is defending his son's actions in beating up the kid

Crazed Rabbit
11-02-2009, 16:35
In San Jose, police handcuff and then taser and beat with batons (http://www.mercurynews.com/top-stories/ci_13629534?nclick_check=1) a non resisting 20 year old Vietnamese exchange student.

The worst part is the sound.

As you watch the video of San Jose police officers beating and Tasing 20-year-old Phuong Ho, the hardest thing is to hear the college student scream in pain. That and the sickening thud of batons, seen only dimly in the cell phone video but unmistakable to the ear.

It is the kind of thing you expect from rogue precincts in Los Angeles or New York. In downtown San Jose, it is stunning.

The thugs with badges got caught on a camera phone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyistav_cjY&feature=player_embedded), which is why their lies where caught.

In Denver, cops attack and then arrest a man (http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/21354053/detail.html) who said he was going to get a video camera to record them.


Taka Fushimi said a deputy then said he was going to tow away his son's bike.

"Then he proceeded to say if they towed it, my son wouldn't ever see his bike again. And I said he was full of ****, ya know ... He told me to go back to the house," said Taka Fushimi.

On the way back to the house, Fushimi admits he told the deputy the case was one of prejudice. He said the deputy responded back, "Yes, it is."

Fushimi said he threatened to get his video camera and that's when the officer came after him. He said the officer first jumped on his back. Then threatened to arrest him before he pushed him into the family's glass window.

Neighbor Terryron Thigpen said she saw the whole thing from her balcony.

"He just went and jumped on the dad," said Thigpen.

Thigpen said she yelled for police to stop and was horrified to see them arrest and assault 85-year-old Taka Fushimi Sr.

Fushimi Sr. said he was just coming out of the house to find out what was going on. He bent down to pick up his son's wallet when officers twisted his arm and pushed him to the concrete.

Finally, in Boulder Colorado, the local police chief decides he doesn't like the annual naked pumpkin run on Halloween. The problem for him is public nudity is legal, so he looks to see what he can charge these people with and decides on indecent exposure, a class 1 misdemeanor 'to knowingly expose his or her genitals in circumstances "likely to cause affront or alarm."' It also gets the person put on the sex offender list for the rest of their lives. (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125693458626119361.html) Of course, the only people likely to see the event at 11pm are the many people who come out specifically to stand along the route and watch. But chief isn't letting the law get in the way of what he wants.


For nearly a decade, naked pumpkin runners did their thing unmolested, stampeding through the frigid dark past crowds of admirers who hooted, hollered and tossed candy. But last year the run attracted more than 150 participants, and Police Chief Mark Beckner fears things are getting out of hand. "It's a free-for-all," he says.

So he intends to stop it.

He will station more than 40 officers on the traditional four-block route tonight, with two SWAT teams patrolling nearby. All have orders to arrest gourd-topped streakers as sex offenders.
...
More recently, Boulder has played host to an annual Naked Bike Ride to protest dependence on fossil fuels. And the Boulder Daily Camera, the local newspaper, serves up a steady stream of stories about clothes-free joggers and nudist gardeners.

Casting about for a law to apply, since nudity per se is not illegal, police hit upon the state's indecent exposure statute, which makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for anyone to knowingly expose his or her genitals in circumstances "likely to cause affront or alarm."

Given that the Naked Pumpkin Run starts at 11 p.m., long after young trick-or-treaters have retired, and given that the route is packed with fans who come out specifically to see the event, runners argue that it's absurd to think their prank is causing either affront or alarm.

Even if the run does catch a few people by surprise, "the joy it brings overall far outweighs the one or two people who could be offended," says Callie Webster, who is 22 and a veteran pumpkinhead.

Police acknowledge they have not been flooded with pumpkin-run-related complaints, but say that's beside the point. A throng of naked people with jack-o-lanterns on their heads is, by definition, an alarming sight, Chief Beckner says. Therefore, it's illegal.

Those convicted of indecent exposure rarely get jail time, but they must register as sex offenders, just as rapists do. Which seems a bit excessive to Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett.

"A lot of times," he says with a sigh, "these people are just being idiots."

Still, Mr. Garnett says he will back up the police, adding, "We will take the cases they give us."

CR

ICantSpellDawg
11-03-2009, 16:33
On the plus side, that girl will think twice about kicking shoes at police officers in the future.

Crazed Rabbit
11-19-2009, 19:50
More likely, she'll detest cops and thus the police will have turned more of the community against them.

And in related news, a cop can't handle a 10 year old, tells her she's going to jail for not listening to her mom, tries to handcuff her, is apparently unable to, so he tases her (http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/years/2009/1118091taser1.html). :dizzy2:
:no:
CR

Megas Methuselah
11-23-2009, 07:51
http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/stonechild/

http://osgoode.yorku.ca/osgmedia.nsf/0/BC2B81B14DDFE5B78525726C0019345A/$FILE/Why%20Did%20He%20Die-.pdf

Old news.

Mooks
11-23-2009, 12:57
My friend's and me were talking the other day, when one of them pointed out something interesting. As he said it "nowadays I feel safer around a person in uniform (soldier) then a cop, that shows how our society is". I completely agree with him, so did everyone else. Im tempted to start a poll here just to see what people say.

Vladimir
11-23-2009, 13:02
So; tell me why someone should feel unsafe around someone in uniform?

Mooks
11-23-2009, 15:06
So; tell me why someone should feel unsafe around someone in uniform?

Thats not the point. Why should somebody feel safer around a soldier then a person specifically hired to "protect and serve" you?

Vladimir
11-23-2009, 15:31
Thats not the point. Why should somebody feel safer around a soldier then a person specifically hired to "protect and serve" you?

That's exactly the point. Is an unarmed man in uniform more of a threat than an armed man with the authority to arrest you?

The 'protect and serve' motto is a fallacy because law enforcement in most of the west is reactive. They are specifically hired to enforce laws.

Although I'm quick to anger, whoever believes what you stated is either ignorant and/or resides in the developing/third world. When someone in the western world feels that way it is less a measure of society and more an indication of how they perceive the world.

Crazed Rabbit
11-23-2009, 16:37
So; tell me why someone should feel unsafe around someone in uniform?

Maybe because in some counties they like to arrest 9 months pregnant women, force them to give birth while shackled (http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/news-politics/video-sheriff-joe-arpaio-forces-woman-give-birth-while-shackled), refuse to let the mother hold the baby, and say they'll turn the baby over to state custody if no one else comes to pick up the child in 72 hours.

The most recent atrocity committed by the self-proclaimed "America's Toughest Sheriff" involves a woman who was detained while 9-months pregnant. Alma Minerva Chacon's case has been receiving media attention due to the brutality with which she was treated. The very same night of her arrest, Chacon went into labor and found herself afraid and alone, being rushed to a local hospital with her hands and legs chained in shackles.

Once she reached the hospital, nurses repeatedly begged the Sheriff's staff to allow them to unchain the mother, but they refused and Chacon was forced to give birth while still shackled to the bed. At one point, the nurse asked for them to release her so that she could be escorted to the bathroom for a urinalysis, but even that request was denied. But the worst came once Chacon gave birth to her baby girl.

Still chained to the bed, Arpaio's police staff refused to allow Chacon to hold her newborn baby and then warned her that if no one came to pick up the child within 72 hours, she would be turned over into state custody.

Or maybe for one of the numerous other examples in this thread alone, showing that thugs with badges can brutalize and kill innocent people and get away with it.

CR

Vladimir
11-23-2009, 17:02
Maybe because in some counties they like to arrest 9 months pregnant women, force them to give birth while shackled (http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/news-politics/video-sheriff-joe-arpaio-forces-woman-give-birth-while-shackled), refuse to let the mother hold the baby, and say they'll turn the baby over to state custody if no one else comes to pick up the child in 72 hours.


Or maybe for one of the numerous other examples in this thread alone, showing that thugs with badges can brutalize and kill innocent people and get away with it.

CR

As discussed, "someone in uniform" describes a member of the armed forces. Look before you leap, Rabbit (yes, pun intended).

Mooks
11-23-2009, 18:29
That's exactly the point. Is an unarmed man in uniform more of a threat than an armed man with the authority to arrest you?

The 'protect and serve' motto is a fallacy because law enforcement in most of the west is reactive. They are specifically hired to enforce laws.

Although I'm quick to anger, whoever believes what you stated is either ignorant and/or resides in the developing/third world. When someone in the western world feels that way it is less a measure of society and more an indication of how they perceive the world.

Just so we are clear here, I used the term "Man in uniform" as a replacement for soldier. Its common around here (Virginia beach, Virginia; military bases all around here).

Or perhaps they have had worse experiances with cops then you? Or maybe just more experiances? With soldiers your less likely to have your car searched, semi-interogated for 20 minutes, and then forced to listen to him/her brag about how theyres so many potheads in this neighborhood but that theyre all losers who are going to move to Norfolk anyway (to name a experiance of my own).

Please do tell what you meant by the western world perspective thing though.

Vladimir
11-23-2009, 20:53
My point is that unless you're an underage Japanese girl on Okinawa or a puppy in Afghanistan, you can feel pretty safe around someone in uniform. I also wasn't referring to me, specifically. It is just an odd thing for a U.S. citizen to say. Sort of a western liberal-elitist opinion. I've known naturalized citizens who had reasons to fear groups of soldiers in their home country say the opposite.

Megas Methuselah
11-23-2009, 21:04
My point is that unless you're an underage Japanese girl on Okinawa or a puppy in Afghanistan, you can feel pretty safe around someone in uniform. I also wasn't referring to me, specifically. It is just an odd thing for a U.S. citizen to say. Sort of a western liberal-elitist opinion. I've known naturalized citizens who had reasons to fear groups of soldiers in their home country say the opposite.

Cops and soldiers are both to be feared. A cop will drop you far outside of town without a shirt/jacket, wearing only jeans and sneakers, in a frigid Canadian winter, or a soldier will bayonet a 14-year old girl (http://www.wawataynews.ca/node/194) trying to stop him from building a golf course on her ancestral burial grounds. :shrug:

Vuk
11-23-2009, 21:10
That is so incredibly racist Megas. Incredibly, incredibly racist. (and yeah, untrue as well) :no:

Megas Methuselah
11-23-2009, 21:33
That is so incredibly racist Megas. Incredibly, incredibly racist. (and yeah, untrue as well) :no:

The bayonet was a minor incident in the Oka Crisis. And the cop thing is in my earlier post on this page.

Vuk
11-23-2009, 21:44
The bayonet was a minor incident in the Oka Crisis. And the cop thing is in my earlier post on this page.
I obviously was not talking about those incidents.

Husar
11-23-2009, 22:46
The 'protect and serve' motto is a fallacy because law enforcement in most of the west is reactive. They are specifically hired to enforce laws.

That's a myth that is spread by the anarchist 5th column in the west to force their militia agenda down peoples' throats.
The reactive actions save the potential next victims and despite that, police forces here do have proactive campaigns, programs etc. to reduce crime, sometimes they show presence, sometimes they visit schools etc. all to prevent crimes before they happen. The anti-police of course, tend to indirectly demand from them to be able to look into the future, which is complete rubbish of course.
A lot of the posts in this thread here seem to show the inherent flaws of camaraderie and corporate identity etc. because everybody tries to hide the flaws of the comrades/corporation under the carpet in a mislead attempt at comradeship or whatever.

Banquo's Ghost
11-24-2009, 07:28
Maybe because in some counties they like to arrest 9 months pregnant women, force them to give birth while shackled (http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/news-politics/video-sheriff-joe-arpaio-forces-woman-give-birth-while-shackled), refuse to let the mother hold the baby, and say they'll turn the baby over to state custody if no one else comes to pick up the child in 72 hours.

That was quite the most barbaric thing I have read for a while.

Are there really no mechanisms for removing and charging someone like that sheriff - who is clearly racist, a brutal criminal and is depriving people of their constitutional protections?

Such behaviour would be embarrassing in Saudi Arabia, let alone the United States.

Louis VI the Fat
11-24-2009, 11:23
Well, just when you thought you'd read it all in this thread...

The 'child birth in shackles' story reaches a new low. Barbaric indeed. What on earth is he thinking, is he doing? This is not law enforcement, this is a sheriff having his own little dictatorship for him to play Mengele.

:no:



I appreciate America's penchant for direct democracy. I do wonder whether directly elected sheriffs are not at the root of many law enforcement problems. Vast swaths of America are patrolled by a largely unchecked law enforcement.

Vladimir
11-24-2009, 13:03
That was quite the most barbaric thing I have read for a while.

Are there really no mechanisms for removing and charging someone like that sheriff - who is clearly racist, a brutal criminal and is depriving people of their constitutional protections?

Such behaviour would be embarrassing in Saudi Arabia, let alone the United States.

You should read more.

That's a rather baseless charge founded on an incomplete story. We don't even know what the mother was charged/convicted of.

Don't tell me that you see a brown woman and assume there is racism involved. That's pretty racist itself.

Banquo's Ghost
11-24-2009, 14:01
You should read more.

Perhaps. Or perhaps I am not yet indifferent to injustice.


That's a rather baseless charge founded on an incomplete story. We don't even know what the mother was charged/convicted of.

Don't tell me that you see a brown woman and assume there is racism involved. That's pretty racist itself.

The publication in the link clearly has a particular agenda. Nonetheless, the sheriff appears to have a penchant for arresting Latinos. If it walks like a duck...

There is no charge or conviction known to mankind that would justify such treatment of a woman (and endanger her child). At least in any civilisation worth the name. The United States is a great civilisation that would normally abhor such behaviour, and I would expect you to be of the same mind.

Vladimir
11-24-2009, 15:34
Perhaps. Or perhaps I am not yet indifferent to injustice.

The publication in the link clearly has a particular agenda. Nonetheless, the sheriff appears to have a penchant for arresting Latinos. If it walks like a duck...

There is no charge or conviction known to mankind that would justify such treatment of a woman (and endanger her child). At least in any civilisation worth the name. The United States is a great civilisation that would normally abhor such behaviour, and I would expect you to be of the same mind.

Banquo: Fighting for truth, justice, and the American way. I can do hyperbole too. ~;)

Stop it man; use your head. What are the demographics of the county? What are the issues it faces, etc? You see a white man arresting Latinos and presume racism. Tell me how that isn't racist itself.

We both know that there are circumstances in life which justify far harsher actions. Context is key which is why oversight is important.

Ser Clegane
11-24-2009, 15:58
We both know that there are circumstances in life which justify far harsher actions. Context is key which is why oversight is important.

Another article on the subject (http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2009-10-22/news/pregnant-latina-says-she-was-forced-to-give-birth-to-her-baby-in-shackles-after-one-of-arpaio-s-deputies-racially-profiled-her/)

Of course I cannot comment on the source, but this article also suggests that

a) the shackling was completely over the top (I do not see any charges that would justify this treatment

b) racism might indeed be an issue here (due to lack of time I did not dig deeper though

Editor's note: This is one of a group of individual accounts of racial profiling by Sheriff Joe Arpaio's forces.

Also:

Sheriff's Office policy states that jail inmates be restrained for "security reasons in an unsecured facility," said Jack MacIntyre, an MCSO deputy chief. McIntyre said a 12-foot chain link was attached to Chacón's leg.

"Let's assume someone is faking labor — that's a hypothetical — and she then chose to escape and hit or assault the hospital staff," McIntyre said. "She could do that easily because it's an unsecured area."
Yes - let's make up stuff to justify this treatment :thumbsdown:

Crazed Rabbit
11-24-2009, 19:52
You should read more.

That's a rather baseless charge founded on an incomplete story. We don't even know what the mother was charged/convicted of.

Don't tell me that you see a brown woman and assume there is racism involved. That's pretty racist itself.

From Ser Clegane's article (above):

Turns out Chacón owed more than $1,000 in fines for driving without a license and had a misdemeanor shoplifting charge. She said that because she isn't allowed to get a driver's license because of her undocumented status, she wasn't able to earn money to pay the fines. She had to drive, she said, to work and support her children. She said even the shoplifting charge came because, after her husband died, she was desperate and stole food to keep her children alive.

The Sheriff of that county is, likely, racist, and his deputies are involved in many violations of human and constitutional rights.

He's had newspaper founders arrested. (http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/bastard/2007/10/breaking_news_new_times_editor.php)

He's launched militaristic raids that burned down houses and crushed cars (http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2004-08-05/news/dog-day-afternoon/print), where deputies prevented a dog from fleeing the burning house - trapping it inside as it burned to death - and the only person they caught was someone with a traffic violation (ie speeding).

His officers have grossly violated the constitution (http://reason.com/blog/2009/11/03/welcome-to-marikafka-county-ar) by taking documents from a lawyer defending someone in a court of law, and he's refused to punish them.

He's deputies have threatened to arrest a reporter for looking at public records (http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2008/06/arpaios_thugs_threaten_to_arre.php). The mayor of Phoenix says:

At a luncheon in March to honor Cesar Chavez, [Phoenix Mayor Phil] Gordon said the Sheriff's Office was doing little more than locking up "brown people with broken tail lights." He reiterated the theme in a May 2008 Latino Perspectives Magazine article, writing that Arpaio has "created a 'Sanctuary County for Felons' with his reckless priorities–that target brown skin and cracked tail lights– instead of killers and drug dealers."

EDIT: Oh yeah, the jailers in the county jail also broke a paraplegic's neck by strapping him into a sort of medieval restraint chair (for six hours), after he demanded a catheter he needed. He needs surgery to remove a vertebra from his neck, and can't use his arms as he used to. They've killed another man in the same chair and severely injured numerous others. (http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1997-01-23/news/jailers-show-a-paraplegic-who-s-boss/)

CR

Vladimir
11-24-2009, 20:37
Sorry, don't buy the hype. If this guy is out of hand, that's why we have the FBI.

Crazed Rabbit
11-24-2009, 20:48
:inquisitive:
Um, it's not hype. It's recorded facts and actions.

CR

Major Robert Dump
11-25-2009, 01:01
I really liked that guy at first, what with the pink suits for the inmates and cracking down on illegals. Now I can truly say that I hope he catches a bullet.

That entire area is in cahoots with this man. He has judges, he has fire officials, he has relatives in the local media. If it weren't for the internet, which I'm sure he hates, we would know none of these hijinks.

I think it is entirely possible he is being investigated by the FBI. The Justice Department has already investigated him and he kept the results hidden until someone FOId him, and he is refusing to make the changes to the jail JD is telling him to.

Sasaki Kojiro
11-25-2009, 01:05
Don't tell me that you see a brown woman and assume there is racism involved. That's pretty racist itself.



How so?

InsaneApache
11-25-2009, 09:49
His crime: possessing a gram of marijuana and calling someone an Englishman.

Now I was all ready to condemn this shire reeve and his antics but this goes beyond the pale. Calling someone an Englishman! I'm sorry he got all he deserved. :whip:

Crazed Rabbit
11-26-2009, 03:53
He is currently under investigation by the FBI. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N26cQaHbYxs)

He's a scumball; he uses deputies to harass, intimidate, and investigate anyone and everyone who criticizes him; judges, mayors, towns (numerous armed deputies raided one city hall after the Fire Chief complained of his racist 'crime sweeps), journalists, the Arizona Attorney General, the county manager, the county board of supervisors, lawyers, politicians, political opponents.

He's arrested and then rearrested people, after the original bogus charges were dropped, because they said they would cut his budget. This tarnishes people's reputations, requires they pay thousands in legal bills, and worse. He's using the power of the state as a personal weapon of retaliation.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
12-12-2009, 00:44
That sheriff is...well, going off the deep end (http://www.theagitator.com/2009/12/10/update-in-maricopa-county/):

# Sheriff Joe Arpaio and Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas filed a bizarre federal lawsuit alleging a wide-ranging conspiracy among the county’s judges and supervisors against Arpaio, Thomas, and Arpaio’s department.
# Thomas indicted two Maricopa County supervisors on corruption charges.
# Then it gets weird. Yesterday, Arpaio and Thomas criminally charged Judge Donahoe (the judge who held Arpaio’s document-swiping deputy in contempt) on bribery charges. Except there was apparently never any actual bribe. They didn’t like how Donahoe had ruled on some motions related to Arpaio’s investigation into the construction of a new tower for the county courthouse. Apparently, Donahoe’s “bribe” was merely his employment with the court system that benefits from the tower. Oh, and he’s also retiring soon.
# Bonus: The indictment documents Thomas released to the press apparently “mistakenly” included Donahoe’s home address.

And the 50 worst police brutality videos that surfaced in 2009. Some have been seen here, but most haven't.

Either way, it's a lot of scum in one blog post:
http://www.injusticeeverywhere.com/?p=1489

Finally, a forum thread from a police officer forum (http://forums.officer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=32653), where cops discuss the benefits of beating the crap out of suspects they've caught.

Ya know, I believe that things have changed for the better and I do understand that some of the things we did so many years ago would get you fired, sued, and probably put in jail for but damned, it did work pretty well most of the time. Whenever my platoon went on third shift housebreaking dropped to almost nothing. It was just a given that if we caught you in a building, and we usually did, you would get an *****-whipping. Nothing really bad and never break anything, but you didn't want to get caught again!

CR

Lemur
12-12-2009, 23:20
Professional SF author Peter Watts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Watts) gets beaten, pepper-sprayed (http://www.boingboing.net/2009/12/11/dr-peter-watts-canad.html), charged with assault and dumped in a t-shirt (no coat) on the wrong end of a snowy bridge. All in a day's work for Homeland Security! Now, naturally, the Border Patrol is pursuing criminal charges against him. Given that they haven't charged him with Assault, I'm betting he never so much as touched them.

And before you point it out, I'm fully aware that we haven't heard the officers' side of the story, and that will be important. Even better would be videotape. However, on the face of it, this looks like gross abuse.

Fragony
12-13-2009, 11:26
This upsets me a little, not really abuse but how can anyone be so incredibly unfair, why destroy a person just because you can? Police can't be blamed here. I hope some people will one day feel a rope around their necks and I am more than willing to pull the handle.

http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/news/Ex-soldier-faces-jail-handing-gun/article-1509082-detail/article.html

caravel
12-13-2009, 12:06
http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/news/Ex-soldier-faces-jail-handing-gun/article-1509082-detail/article.html

Complete and utter madness...

Husar
12-13-2009, 13:51
Complete and utter madness...

Yes, absolutely. :no:

Louis VI the Fat
12-13-2009, 17:33
This upsets me a little, not really abuse but how can anyone be so incredibly unfair, why destroy a person just because you can? Police can't be blamed here. I hope some people will one day feel a rope around their necks and I am more than willing to pull the handle.

http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/news/Ex-soldier-faces-jail-handing-gun/article-1509082-detail/article.htmlIncidentally, this is the same man who allegedly attacked a DVLA inspector:

Man accused of attacking DVLA inspector with broom walks free Monday, September 29, 2008, 17:27


A man accused of beating a DVLA inspector with a broom handle as walked free from court after claiming his alleged victim had exaggarated the incident.
Inspector Hayden Hart had claimed he was attakced my Paul Clarke, 26, as he patrolled Wood Street, Merstham, checking parked cars for out-of-date tax discs.


The inspector said he was clubbed repeatedly by his attacker, who warned him: "If you come near my vehicle again, I'll break your f****** legs."
But Mr Clarke, of Wood Street, Merstham, walked free from the Crown Court at Guildford after winning his appeal against conviction for assault by beating at Redhill Magistrates Court on March 12 this year.


Mr Clarke, 26, of Nailsworth Crescent, Merstham, denied the offence, insisting he had never actually struck Mr Hart during the confrontation on June 12 last year (2007).


http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/golf/Man-accused-attacking-DVLA-inspector-broom-walks-free/article-361380-detail/article.html

Maybe Mr Clarke got a narrow escape from this case, and decided to mend his ways? Like, handing in his gun? If this is what you do with a broom stick, what will you do next time you seek a fight and you are armed with an illegal firearm?


If you are in the possesion of an illegal gun, do you hand it over stating that you bought it in a seedy bar, or do you say you 'found' it in a garbage can?

This case may not be as clear-cut as Mr. Clarke's fine lawyer and the local newspaper make it out to be.

Major Robert Dump
12-14-2009, 06:16
Why in the loving hell would you find a gun and take it to the police station instead of calling the cops to come get it?

It doesn't matter if he was aare of the ordinance or not, it's just common sense. I think the man may be mildy retarded:

He called the police, right? He set up an appointment, right? But he failed to mention why he was coming to the station....and walked into the police station with a freaking gun, then went into the guys office, took the gun out and laid it on a desk?????? Are you kidding me? He is lucky he didn't get shot. The mere fact that he chose to never mention the weapon prior to the meeting tells me something is amiss, either in his head or in his story.

Louis VI the Fat
12-14-2009, 12:14
The plot thickens!

What a fascinating case. Deserving of its own thread. An excellent article here: http://jackofkent.blogspot.com/2009/11/paul-clarke-anatomy-of-injustice.html


Apparantly, Paul Clarke had been in possesion of the firearm for some days. (More?) His version of how he came in possesion of it seems not very credible.

Paul Clarke was known to the police. From the 'broomstick' case and yet another case involving violence. He is not the upstanding citizen that newspaper article makes him out to be.

The police station's Chief Superintendant Harper is currently suspended from duty.

Two top cops have been suspended for alleged dishonest conduct regarding speeding penalties.
Surrey Police chief superintendent Adrian Harper, the divisional commander for East Surrey division, was suspended, today, (Friday May 22), for alleged dishonest conduct regarding the avoidance of speeding penalties.
West Surrey division's superintendent Johnny Johncox has also been suspended for the same reason.
The suspensions are as a result of a review carried out by Surrey Police Professional Standards Department.
The review looked into the granting of exemptions to police officers and staff for speeding and red traffic signal offences.
This suspension is, quite apart from being relevant to this thread, important for establishing the culture and norms of this police station. These norms have an effect on this case, because the law and police guidelines leave a lot of (unintended) room for the individual officer in the decision to prosecute the handing over of firearms or not.

Police in England and Wales have a guideline for persons handing in firearms. Which is to give preference to getting illegal firearms of the street. It is close to a 'don't ask, don't tell' policy:

Anyone surrendering an illegally held firearm should be questioned discreetly with a view to establishing its history but, unless circumstances exist to give serious cause for concern as to its provenance (for example, if it appears to have been stolen), the person handing it in should not be pressed. The emphasis should be on creating an environment in which people hand in illegally held firearms.

Surrey police didn't know, nor follow this guideline. I think the law and this guideline leaves too much room to individual police officers for abuse.

Crazed Rabbit
12-18-2009, 06:50
Philadelphia; (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/79288022.html?viewAll=y)
A convicted drug dealer shows up at a mans house, and demand's to see a woman there. The man says no, the criminal punches the man. The man pulls a gun and the criminal flees. The man calls police.

In the morning, the police arrive. They arrest the man who defended himself. The criminal is standing outside near the cops - because he's related to the cops.

They take the man to the station and put him in a cell. They release him.

But a week later, they come and arrest him - because they say it's a domestic dispute with a gun. He's charged with multiple crimes (felony aggravated assault, possession of an instrument of crime, terroristic threats, simple assault and recklessly endangering another person.)

Then the criminal threatens to burn down the man's house. Then he makes good on his threat and someone lights a small fire outside one side of the house.

Through all this, the convicted criminal who attacked a man in his home was never charged with anything.

He wasn't even questioned about the fire until some reporters called and asked why not.
IT WAS just after midnight. Brian Westberry and a woman friend sat frozen in his bedroom, hoping the persistent pounding on the front door of his Northeast Philly home would stop. It didn't.

Westberry, 24, slipped his licensed .38-caliber revolver into his pants pocket and crept downstairs to open the door.

There stood Gregory Cujdik, 32, who demanded to see "Jen," his girlfriend. Westberry told him "Jen" didn't want to see him, and repeatedly ordered Cujdik to leave. When Cujdik refused, Westberry threatened to call police.

" 'Do it. My family are cops,' " Cujdik said, according to Westberry.

What Westberry didn't know at that early-morning hour of Palm Sunday, April 5, was that Cujdik's father, Louis, is a retired police veteran and that his two brothers, Jeffrey and Richard, are narcotics officers.

Before Westberry could finish dialing 9-1-1 on his cell phone, Cujdik stepped through the doorway and punched him in the throat, Westberry said.

That's when Westberry pulled out his gun and Cujdik fled, Westberry told the Daily News.

Westberry never fired the gun. In fact, Westberry suffered the only injury when Cujdik staggered him with a punch. But rather than arrest Cujdik, a convicted drug dealer, authorities slapped Westberry with a slew of criminal charges, including felony aggravated assault, possession of an instrument of crime, terroristic threats, simple assault and recklessly endangering another person.

From there, Westberry's life got worse. Westberry believes Cudjik is behind a Nov. 14 arson of his house. Detectives didn't question Cujdik until after a Daily News reporter asked a police captain about the case earlier this month.

Cujdik did not return messages from the Daily News left on his cell phone.

Westberry and his family allege that police considered Cujdik untouchable and gave him preferential treatment because of his family ties to law enforcement.

"From the get-go, they chose to arrest me, not him, only because they knew his family," Westberry said. "I believe the justice system is fair - unless you know somebody."

Seasoned legal experts who reviewed the case say that Westberry's arrest raises serious questions about the integrity of both the Police Department and the District Attorney's Office, which approved the criminal charges against Westberry.

Six months after the incident, on Oct. 6, prosecutors withdrew the charges, but by then Westberry had spent thousands of dollars in legal fees. His record has yet to be expunged.

The Westberry case comes at a time when some police officers are under fire for allegedly abusing their authority in personal matters. The case also seems to bolster recent criticism that the district attorney's charging unit merely "rubber stamps" criminal charges recommended by police.

After Jack McMahon, a defense attorney and former prosecutor, read the police paperwork for Westberry's arrest, he said that the wrong person had been charged.

"The defendant didn't break the law. The complainant did," said McMahon, who did not represent Westberry. "Legally, there's absolutely no basis for Cujdik not to be charged."

Westberry was well within his legal right to use his gun to protect himself in his own home, McMahon said.

"There's no evidence of aggravated assault even under the remotest of criminal theories," he said.

The detective who arrested Westberry, Patricia Eberhart, has close ties to Cujdik's family. Her husband, Richard Eberhart, was Jeffrey Cujdik's partner in the Narcotics Field Unit before retiring in 2006. Together, Richard Eberhart and Jeffrey Cujdik own J&R Dunk Tank Rentals LLC, in Bensalem.

In Patricia Eberhart's defense, Capt. Jack McGinnis, of Northeast Detectives, said that she didn't think Westberry should've been charged but that he disagreed. It was only then that Eberhart submitted a probable-cause affidavit for Westberry's arrest to the D.A.'s office for approval.

McGinnis characterized Eberhart, who was promoted to detective in August 2008, as a "straight shooter" and a fair-minded detective.

But Eberhart should have recused herself from the case, given her strong connection with the Cujdik family, said McGinnis.

McGinnis said that he didn't know of the Cujdik family until after the Daily News launched its "Tainted Justice" series earlier this year. The series detailed allegations that Jeffrey and Richard Cujdik and other narcotics officers disabled surveillance cameras at corner grocery stores that sold little ziplock bags, which police consider drug paraphernalia.

After the officers cut or yanked camera wires, thousands of dollars in cash and merchandise went missing, the merchants allege. The FBI is investigating the allegations.

The problem with Eberhart's handling of Gregory Cujdik's complaint "is the appearance" of bias, even when none exists, McGinnis said.

From now on, he said, Eberhart "is not allowed to be involved in any case involving the Cujdiks. We never allow our detectives to get involved in a case where it could be a conflict of interest.

"It's not right for her to handle a case involving any member of the [Cujdik] family."
CR

Major Robert Dump
12-19-2009, 17:03
Popular local homeless man is murdered:
http://www.newsok.com/article/3410317?searched=bicycle%20bob&custom_click=searc

His homeless "buddy" finds body and leads police to it, then "confesses" after being detained and questioned for 9 hours. The confession is very detailed, but incidentally, never addresses a missing finger and the fact that the accused was in jail for public intox around the time of the murder. He is later charged. Locals suddenly feel terrible for not helping the two homeless men out more....
http://www.newsok.com/article/3410780?searched=bicycle%20bob&custom_click=search

Wierdo gives a married female he has a crush on a gift: a finger from a man he says he murdered. Her husband calls police:
http://www.newsok.com/article/3426161?searched=bicycle%20bob&custom_click=search

Cops stand by their case, saying it wasn't their fault the wrong guy confessed.
Yeah.
http://www.news9.com/Global/story.asp?S=11689601

Now before people, like some in the last article say "kudos to the cops for continuing to investigate leads" I would respond:
1)its their job
2)it had not gone to trial
3)they didnt talk of the missing finger too much, and someone suddenly says they have it, well, i guess they dont have a choice.

So shame on them for bullying a dumb, alcoholic homeless guy into confessing to this murder, complete with grisly details and entailed human drama.


Man in enid held 2.5 years finally gets acquitted because forensics evidence does not, and never has, link him to the crime and outright disproves Enid police testimony. THE PUBLIC DEFENDER GOT HIM OFF. IMAGINE IF HE HAD A PAID ATTORNEY. OSBI is now investigating and the officers are on leave:
http://www.newsok.com/acquittal-brings-relief-to-daughter-ire-of-others/article/3426162?custom_click=lead_story_title

Crazed Rabbit
12-19-2009, 20:24
Police officer stalks a stripper (http://www.ocweekly.com/2007-02-08/news/illegally-park-ed/) (actually, many from the same joint), stops her car one night after waiting outside for her to leave, then forces her to..."pleasure" him...and ejaculates on her.

He gets off at a criminal trial after his attorney implied the woman was a whore and wanted it, even though he blatantly lied in the trial.


No one disputes that an on-duty Irvine police officer got an erection and ejaculated on a motorist during an early-morning traffic stop in Laguna Beach. The female driver reported it, DNA testing confirmed it and officer David Alex Park finally admitted it.

When the case went to trial, however, defense attorney Al Stokke argued that Park wasn't responsible for making sticky all over the woman's sweater. He insisted that she made the married patrolman make the mess—after all, she was on her way home from work as a dancer at Captain Cream Cabaret.

"She got what she wanted," said Stokke. "She's an overtly sexual person.
...
It wasn't a surprise that Stokke put the woman and her part-time occupation on trial. In his opening argument, he made it The Good Cop versus The Slutty Stripper. He pointed out that she'd once had a violent fight with a boyfriend in San Diego. He mocked her inability to keep a driver's license. He accused her of purposefully "weakening" Park so that he became "a man," not a cop during the traffic stop. He called her a liar angling for easy lawsuit cash. He called her a whore without saying the word.

"You dance around a pole, don't you?" Stokke asked.

Superior Court Judge William Evans ruled the question irrelevant.

Stokke saw he was scoring points with the jury.

"Do you place a pole between your legs and go up and down?" he asked.

"No," said Lucy before the judge interrupted.

"You do the dancing to get men to do what you what them to do," said Stokke. "And the same thing happened out there on that highway [in Laguna Beach]. You wanted [Park] to take some sex!"

At least the city gave her $400k to settle a lawsuit.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
12-19-2009, 20:52
Double post. Curse you, forum database errors!

Major Robert Dump
12-19-2009, 21:34
I can't believe the article said "he made sticky"

I can, however, believe an Irving cop did that, considering what I have had to deal with when dealing with them as a PI. That whole force, and city government for that matter, needs to be purged. They are full of fraudsters, the lot of them.

Major Robert Dump
12-20-2009, 15:40
Don't throw snowballs at plainclothes detectives in a personal vehicle or you may get a gun pulled on you:
http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/citydesk/2009/12/19/did-d-c-cops-overreact-to-snowball-fight-14th-and-u/

What's even more funny is local police fanbooys tried to say it was a hostile protest of a bunch of left wingers, when really it was just a large organized snow ball war

Crazed Rabbit
12-20-2009, 18:51
Gah, MRD beat me to it.

Here's another source (http://www.nbcwashington.com/weather/stories/Eyewitness_Confirms__Cop_Freaks_Out_Over_Snowball_ Fight_Waves_Gun-79729162.html), complete with wide angle shots of the snow ball fight (showing no political signs), and a commenter insisting the people were anarchist types:

What this article fails to mention is that there were several left wing/anarchist types at this snowball fight and that it was meant to be a political protest as much as a snowball fight. People with masks and bandanas around their face (and various anti-war/anti-capitalism signs) were pelting cars as they passed. One happened t be a plain-closed detective. He got out with a walkie talky (HE WAS NOT THE ONE WITH A GUN) and called for patrolmen to respond. After being called every imaginable obscenity and getting hit with many snowballs, one to the face, other officers arrived, one of these patrol had his gun withdrawn (not pointed at anyone) and told the group to break up. As soon as he saw there was no immediate threat the officer holstered his gun, even as he was hit with snowballs himself
:no:
CR

Major Robert Dump
12-20-2009, 20:40
OMG they wore Bandannas and masks? It's not like it was a snowstorm or anything! I thin:laugh4:k they should be charged with TERRORISM

Crazed Rabbit
01-10-2010, 18:01
Two years ago, a SWAT team in Toledo Ohio burst into a house on a drug raid. They found some dogs in the house, and naturally shot them to death. Then officer Joseph Chavalia heard those gun shots and so shot at one of the people in the house; the 26 year old mother holding her one year old son.

He killed her and wounded her son (http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080107/NEWS17/801070420/-1/NEWS) and was charged with a misdemeanor crimes (http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081016/NEWS03/810160388) and found innocent.


He said he saw a shadowy figure ducking in and out of a doorway and fired his fully automatic rifle when he heard gunfire that coincided with the person's movements.

So seeing a person you can't identify in a house you know is full of children, after you detonated a grenade outside to scare them and are shooting their dogs inside, and then shooting to kill them, is good enough reason (http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081016/NEWS03/810160388) for the sheriff's review.

CR

Megas Methuselah
01-11-2010, 04:44
Moonyash pigs.

Crazed Rabbit
01-15-2010, 18:49
State Troopers arrest and rough up a former Marine (http://www.publicopiniononline.com/localnews/ci_14185308) for daring to question an off duty officer who was illegally parked in a fire lane outside a grocery store.


When a Chambersburg man left the grocery store Sunday afternoon, he thought it was nervy that someone parked a pickup truck in the fire lane beside the entrance, so he asked the driver what gave him the privilege. The driver was an off-duty state police trooper, and by the end of the night the man with the question was in jail with facial injuries and charges pending against him.

Ron Doyle acknowledges that he speaks his mind, and wasn't too shy about asking the driver of the pickup parked in the "Fire Lane -- No Parking" area in front of the Norland Avenue Giant Sunday afternoon why he was there.

Doyle said he went to the store after watching one of the NFL playoff games and he walked to get there. He was there earlier in the day and his car wouldn't start for the trip home, so Doyle walked home to Scotland Avenue and walked back later to get some things at Staples and Giant, and bring home his car.

The man in the pickup truck flashed a badge from his wallet, saying that badge entitled him to park there.

Doyle replied that the man was "special" since he was not in a patrol car, or in uniform, and had a child with him.

Doyle said he walked away, and the off-duty officer, Trooper Craig Finkle, called him back. Doyle said he walked part way back to Finkle and heard the off-duty officer ask on his cell phone for "units that can roll now."

Doyle went to his car, it started, and he went home.

Finkle followed, he said, but when Doyle turned into the
Advertisement
alley by Norland Pub that gives him access to his driveway, Finkle continued along Norland Avenue.

At home where he lives alone with two bulldogs, Doyle said he put away his groceries, let his dogs out of the kitchen area, and had a martini he'd prepared earlier and left on the counter. He said he'd had the same kind of drink earlier in the day.

When Doyle saw three state police cars pull in behind his duplex, he gathered up his dogs and got them upstairs so he could confine them to a front bedroom. When the troopers began knocking on the window of his newly installed back door, the female dog gave Doyle a bit of a hard time about moving away from the knocking instead of toward it, but when he commanded her and the male to go up to the bedroom, they went.

As Doyle came down the stairs, he called 911 and asked for borough police assistance.

"I told them I needed borough cops at my place, that state police were yelling I was under arrest and I didn't even do anything," Doyle told Public Opinion.

By the time Doyle got back to his kitchen door, he said the officers were pounding on the door and yelling at him that he was under arrest for disorderly conduct.

"I kept the phone open with the (911) operator on the line and told these guys that I was going to open the door, to please don't break the glass in my new door," Doyle said.

As Doyle begin turning the lock on the door to open it, in the affidavit of probable cause filed in the case, the officers said Doyle had "an aggressive stance" when he opened the door, which swings into the kitchen.

Doyle said one of the troopers kicked it in, denting the new metal door, and the two troopers dragged him to the ground.

When his face bounced off the floor, the nose piece on his eyeglasses cut across the bridge of his nose, and he also suffered an open abrasion above his forehead.

When Doyle was taken outside and spread over the hood of a patrol car and handcuffed, the retired Marine who'd worked as a civilian policeman on military bases after his service said he told state police troopers he wanted an attorney. He also asked them if someone could let his dogs out of the bedroom so they'd have access to water while he was gone.

Doyle was taken to Chambersburg Hospital for a blood-alcohol test and then booked into Franklin County Jail on two charges of driving under the influence and one charge of disorderly conduct. He was released on personal recognizance Monday after a teleconference with a judge.

The charging officers never saw Doyle drive, he said, and while he drank after he got home, he didn't drive to Giant that afternoon -- he walked. The charging officers also did not witness his discussion with Finkle, who called for troopers to "roll out" on Doyle after his question about parking in a fire lane, he said.

According to the officers who filed the charges, Troopers Gross and Remington, Finkle told them that Doyle yelled obscenities across the lot of Giant at Finkle and was publicly drunk.

The affidavit of probable cause also states that Doyle yelled obscenities at the officers who came to his house. Doyle said most of his conversation should be on the 911 recording because he left the line open when the troopers were there and Doyle wanted borough assistance.

Public Opinion filed a Freedom of Information request on Tuesday for that tape, and was notified on Wednesday by County Clerk Jean Byers, who is the county's appointed open records officer, that "the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the interest in nondisclosure."

Public Opinion filed an appeal with the Pennsylvania Open Records office the same day its request was denied.

Doyle has been active with the local Marine Corps League and was the commander when he instituted the national Toys for Tots program locally, which that branch of the league had not been doing at the time. He moved here to work at Letterkenny, and is retired from there.

In the late 1990s Doyle and a woman he was living with separated and she filed a Protection from Abuse order against him through the local courts. He was in court after returning to the property to give the woman back money he had borrowed to get his car fixed -- she had a camera ready when he came on the property with the money and that proof put him before a judge.

Public Opinion talked to a few people affiliated with the Marine Corps League, who said they don't know Doyle to be someone who would provoke a take-down by state police, especially having been a Marine and policeman himself.

Doyle's preliminary hearing is set for Tuesday before Magisterial District Judge Gary L. Carter. Doyle is represented by Hagerstown, Md., area attorney James Reed.

CR

Vladimir
01-15-2010, 19:44
Looks like a case of Keystone cops to me. :clown:

drone
01-15-2010, 20:09
Looks like a case of Keystone cops to me. :clown:

Gregoshi has trained you well... :2thumbsup:

Crazed Rabbit
01-19-2010, 17:23
In Eugene Oregon cops arrest a man for putting quarters in expired parking meters of strangers:
http://www.wftv.com/video/22266075/index.html?source=CNN

CR

Vladimir
01-19-2010, 20:32
In Eugene Oregon cops arrest a man for putting quarters in expired parking meters of strangers:
http://www.wftv.com/video/22266075/index.html?source=CNN

CR

:laugh4: I've heard of that before. Last time it was an old lady.

It's similar to another story about a toll booth. A guy is short on change, opens up his door, finds a coin, throws it in the bin and subsequently receives a ticket. The reason given was something along the lines of "It wasn't your money" or something.

This more accurately falls under the category of Bored Cop Syndrome, stupid human tricks, or Rudy Giuliani.

Demetrius Scholarius
01-20-2010, 11:47
In Eugene Oregon cops arrest a man for putting quarters in expired parking meters of strangers:
http://www.wftv.com/video/22266075/index.html?source=CNN

CR

Another reason not to help people, but live for yourself instead...

Major Robert Dump
01-23-2010, 19:09
Plainclothes Police beat the crap out of honor student violinist because he has a gun, and by gun I mean bottle of soda.

http://www.wpxi.com/news/22311848/detail.html

How can you resist arrest if the arrest is illegal to begin with?

And I'm sorry, but a plainclothes cop identifying himself as police means nothing to me until i see a badge. In emergency situations I could see where there is no time for that, but 3 cops standing 4 feet from the kid had every chance to keep this from escalating

Zim
01-24-2010, 12:16
Finally, something not too many hours from where I live.

Told to stop and the parking attendant walked on? Then he continues? And later possible gets arrested? (the video ends a bit early). I can't say i feel too bad.

Parking cops have a thing about being ignored, even more than regular cops. I'm not surprised something happened when he continued after disobeying a lawful order (an arrestable offense by itself).

A lame news story? Yes? A police abuse? At best a pretty weak one.

Sometimes pretty lame things are illegal. Sometimes you should write your congressman rather than disobey police on the scene. Heck, even hide out an hour and then put quarters in people's meters.

I don't know. My agency is so underfunded we can't afford to bother with stuff like this. Maybe I'm biased.


In Eugene Oregon cops arrest a man for putting quarters in expired parking meters of strangers:
http://www.wftv.com/video/22266075/index.html?source=CNN

CR

Demetrius Scholarius
01-24-2010, 13:26
Parking cops are gods among men, or that's what parking cops think...

Zim
01-24-2010, 13:31
Parking cops are thought quite poorly of y other cops, and may develop a Napoleon complex due to such poor treatment.

I couldn't believe that in the local police department they make the CSOs (parking cops, among other minor jobs) clean the backs of police cars (of puke, excrement, and other things suspects leave behind). No wonder they overreach. They feel they wear the same uniforms and take the same risks, only to be mocked.
At any rate, disobeying a lawful order is disobeying a lawful order. I'd wait, then drop some more quarters. Heck, my area's CSOs can only afford to check twice a day (once to see which cars are parkedd where, once to check if they are still there) I would like to see more video, though, it seemed that site was cut short. In the academy we had a video of a Boston traffic cop as an example of what not to do.


Parking cops are gods among men, or that's what parking cops think...

Crazed Rabbit
01-25-2010, 22:42
Gene Weingarten, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and Washington Post Columnist, on police abuses of the legal sort (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/22/AR2010012202273_pf.html):

Last week I was a juror in the trial of a man accused of selling a $10 bag of heroin to an undercover police officer. At the end of the two days of testimony, I concluded that the defendant was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I also concluded that he should be acquitted.

In my mind, it came down to a simple, unsettling question: Is it worse to let a drug dealer go free, or to reward the police for lying under oath?
...
As I saw it, the defendant was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. But there was a complication.

The "eyes" officer in this case -- the only person who claimed to have seen the cash and drugs change hands -- testified that he had radioed the following description of the suspect: black male, black jacket, royal blue baseball hat, v-necked white t-shirt, sneakers, key on a chain around his neck, carrying a bottle of ginger ale. He said his view had been unobstructed, on a clear day, from a distance of 50 to 60 feet.

Defense lawyer Jon W. Norris produced aerial photographs to prove that this was wrong. Between the place that the eyes said he was sitting and the place the police said the transaction occurred was a full-length basketball court -- 80 feet -- plus a lot more pavement. Norris sent an investigator to the scene to measure the total distance: It was, the investigator testified, 172 feet. The prosecutor never contested this. He couldn't. The discrepancy was verified by satellite imagery.

So the eyes had seen a ginger ale bottle at 172 feet? Really? That's some set of eyes the eyes had.

One morning, my wife and I went out into the street, measured off 172 feet and stood at either end. My eyesight is 20-20 with glasses. Her eyesight is 20-20 without glasses. From that distance, I could not see a trace of the key I had hung around her neck. She could not begin to distinguish the Sprite bottle I carried from any other greenish bottle-shaped thing. From that distance, you couldn't tell a v-neck from a crew neck or, for that matter, a T-shirt from a polo shirt.

I concluded that the eyes had lied about the specificity of his radioed description -- and that he wasn't the only one. Two other police officers who had been at the scene testified that they'd heard exactly that description, word for word, detail for detail, down to the ginger ale bottle. They said they were certain.

How could this be? Defense lawyer Norris offered a theory: The officers had colluded in a fabrication. To better justify the arrest, he said, they had improved upon what had probably been a much sketchier original description. Once they had all seen the defendant up close, in handcuffs, and examined photos of him taken at the scene, all the little details became clear: the v-neck, the key, the ginger ale bottle. Retroactively, Norris suggested, they produced a perfect description.

Hadn't the initial description been tape-recorded? No. The D.C. police testified that they do not do that. Sending a radio message out over a recorded channel, they said, would risk that the message could be intercepted by the bad guys on a police scanner and alert them to the sting. I found myself wondering: If the police wanted to, couldn't they just put a cheap recording device in the eyes' car? Just for the record?

But they don't. Possibly they don't want the record.
...
At the end of the day, after four hours of deliberations over a $10 drug bust, the deadlocked jury was sent home for the night. They came back the next day and tried again. More hours passed. In the end, they pronounced themselves hopelessly hung. A mistrial was declared.

I later spoke with one of the jurors, who told me they had been split, 10 for acquittal and two for a guilty verdict. Many of them had simply mistrusted the eyes. They didn't believe he could have possibly seen the ginger ale bottle or the v-neck or the key, and they felt his apparent willingness to lie had tainted the prosecution's whole case.

The prosecution seemed to get the message. On Friday, they said they would not refile the charges. The defendant is now free.

I'm proud of our jury system. I can't say the same about our police.

CR

Ice
01-26-2010, 01:58
Looks like a case of Keystone cops to me. :clown:

The policemen I spoke to the other days was very professional and friendly.

It's a shame a few idiots give all police officers a bad name.

Vladimir
01-26-2010, 13:33
Gene Weingarten, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and Washington Post Columnist, on police abuses of the legal sort (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/22/AR2010012202273_pf.html):


CR

And we all know journalists are infallible; especially those from the centrist and equitable WaPo.

Far from lying, this is more a case of cognitive biases and perceptions. This whole case is silly; from the $10 bust to quibbling over a bottle.

Crazed Rabbit
01-31-2010, 19:01
And we all know journalists are infallible; especially those from the centrist and equitable WaPo.

Far from lying, this is more a case of cognitive biases and perceptions. This whole case is silly; from the $10 bust to quibbling over a bottle.

It's not quibbling; the point is that all the police who testified conspired to lie in court.

Also, I don't care for the TSA at all, but I think I'll said with them in one case (http://www.nj.com/hobokennow/index.ssf/2010/01/ex-team_commander_in_hoboken_s.html);

According to a Tampa police log, two TIA police officers responded to a disturbance call at 9:15 a.m. when Andriani, 56, who was in line for a flight to New Jersey, became irate when airline flight crew members were permitted to pass him in line at a Transportation Security Administration checkpoint. He took pictures of TSA agents' badges, police said.

Ann Davis, TSA spokeswoman, said the passenger yelled at TSA officers, complained about the screening process, displayed a badge and said he was a police officer.

Airport police ran a wanted check on him before allowing him to continue to his flight, the police log said.

Hoboken Police Chief Anthony Falco said that, since this relates to an internal investigation within the police department, he is required by attorney general guidelines not to comment. Falco said he does not know Andriani's current residence.

This 'officer', Andriani, was the leader of a Hoboken, NJ, SWAT team that went down to New Orleans after Katrina, and again some time later, to "help" with hurricane recovery. Instead they went to a Hooters restaurant (http://www.nj.com/hobokennow/index.ssf/2007/11/hot_night_at_the_council_meeti.html), took pictures (http://media.myfoxny.com/swat/swat/swathooters.html)of the girls posing around their van, with guns, and of themselves downing jello shots.


Andriani and other members of the city's SWAT team had gone on a supposed mission of mercy to help survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

Photos and videos, though, showed them in police-issued gear posing with bare-breasted women at Mardi Gras in New Orleans, letting Hooters girls hold their weapons in Alabama and downing Jello shots in a Louisiana bar. They also show him posing in a Confederate cap and pretending to be a Ku Klux Klan member at a restaurant.

And the most disgusting part? When the photos surfaced in 2007, Andriani was punished - with a two year suspension, paid.

Yes, he was given his full salary every month for two years and didn't have to work. That's $132,000 a year for doing absolutely nothing.

Gee, with such decisive punishments, it's no wonder there's so few cops who break the rules!


:wall:
CR

Crazed Rabbit
04-15-2010, 09:07
This thread is to depressing to update often.

Anyway, here's some more lying cops. Apparently some guy asked them why they were arresting his friend. They push him away repeatedly, though he wasn't close to touching any of them. They tell him to leave the public street, and when he doesn't run away, they arrest him and lie on their reports in order to to try and convict him.

Luckily for him, a video shows the liars for what they are (http://www.thestate.com/2010/04/11/1238849/sled-to-investigate-officers-in.html).

Here's a fun blog post (http://www.injusticeeverywhere.com/?p=947)on how union arbitrators force police departments to rehire officers that shot innocent people, while drunk, and while hitting said innocent with their pistol.

Reckless Chicago cops caused permanent brain injury (http://www.suntimes.com/news/cityhall/2154255,varela-brain-damage-police-chase-041210.article) to a young woman back in 2004 and failed an attempted cover up, so now the city will pay $3million.

Michigan police assault and tazer a man (http://www.wwmt.com/articles/margin-1374949-bottom-dog.html), then needlessly shoot his dog to death.

EDIT: A Recent one; in early march Prince George County (Maryland) cops viciously and without provocation attack (http://www.baltimoresun.com/videobeta/?watchId=c3346d20-2e50-4b00-9781-a3a30b29fef6) a student celebrating his college's basketball win. Of course, he was arrested and charged with crimes before the video surfaced. One cop has been suspended. No sign yet that any will be fired, much less charged with a crime.

Yay for police badges giving people the power to randomly assault others!

CR

Vladimir
04-15-2010, 12:31
Sorry, not sure if this was posted already. Maryland police beating of some punk college whipper snapper is making big news around here:

http://www.google.com/search?q=maryland+police+beating&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&client=firefox-a&rlz=1R1GGGL_en___US334

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAPwyodTkYA

It's his fault, really. You don't just go walking up on a horse like that.

:laugh4: I love it when civilian cops raise the baton above their heads. We would get in so much trouble for that.

But no, seriously, it looks like these cops should be beat down themselves

drone
04-15-2010, 14:58
In defense of the PG County police, the Maryland students always riot, win or lose, when they play Duke. :laugh4:

Seamus Fermanagh
04-15-2010, 17:56
This thread is consistently depressing.

Vladimir
04-16-2010, 13:22
If a thread entitled "Police Abuses" becomes cheerful than I'd loose faith in humanity.

Louis VI the Fat
04-16-2010, 13:36
To add insult to injury, I'll share the following video for consideration.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1aGocpRpUg&feature=related'

this video shows how the norwiangen police are brutally abusing a non returnable refugee in fagerli norway, like they are not human being. "police and his dog, stepping on a man neck with his foot over and over again, lay on the grand with handcuff on him".U.N is not doing anything about them and non do human right group. this people desperately need help and the norwiangen government is covering it them up, they are in this country with no identity card or papers to walk around even in the city". "you can not see it, shown on norwiangen media". "why?" '

Warning! Video contains shocking images of police brutality of the Norwegian kind, such as a person being handcuffed, while another is holding him down! What outrage! Where is the UN!?!?

Yes, there are countries where this is the level of police abuse that shocks public order. :shame:

rvg
04-16-2010, 14:58
Brave millcents tolchoking old vecks and luscious young malchiks. All in the name of the good old ultra-violence. Real horrorshow.

drone
04-16-2010, 15:55
this video shows how the norwiangen police are brutally abusing a non returnable refugee in fagerli norway, like they are not human being. "police and his dog, stepping on a man neck with his foot over and over again, lay on the grand with handcuff on him".U.N is not doing anything about them and non do human right group. this people desperately need help and the norwiangen government is covering it them up, they are in this country with no identity card or papers to walk around even in the city". "you can not see it, shown on norwiangen media". "why?"
The first guy they get off the ground is a Flyers fan. Obviously a dangerous hooligan, a little of the rough stuff is necessary.

InsaneApache
04-16-2010, 19:01
Brave millcents tolchoking old vecks and luscious young malchiks. All in the name of the good old ultra-violence. Real horrorshow.

Viddy thee well brother, viddy thee well.

Vladimir
04-19-2010, 15:24
To add insult to injury, I'll share the following video for consideration.



this video shows how the Norwegian police are brutally abusing a non returnable refugee in fagerli norway, like they are not human being. "police and his dog, stepping on a man neck with his foot over and over again, lay on the grand with handcuff on him".U.N is not doing anything about them and non do human right group. this people desperately need help and the norwiangen government is covering it them up, they are in this country with no identity card or papers to walk around even in the city". "you can not see it, shown on Norwegian media". "why?" '

Warning! Video contains shocking images of police brutality of the Norwegian kind, such as a person being handcuffed, while another is holding him down! What outrage! Where is the UN!?!?

Yes, there are countries where this is the level of police abuse that shocks public order. :shame:

The video was no doubt taken from an Apache helicopter.

No, really. What is the context? Why were they being arrested in the first place? Who called the K9 officer over? Why were there two suspects? Looks to me like the suspect was lifting his head and body up and the police officer brought him back down. I've seen something similar once and got a piece of the action. In my case, the guy was violently drunk and took every opportunity to fight whoever was around him. Who's to say that wasn't so in this case.

What's more outrageous to me is the outrage. Armchair cops having purely emotional overreactions to something they find offensive. Some people live a far too comfortable life. :juggle2:

Husar
04-19-2010, 20:33
No, really. What is the context? Why were they being arrested in the first place? Who called the K9 officer over? Why were there two suspects? Looks to me like the suspect was lifting his head and body up and the police officer brought him back down. I've seen something similar once and got a piece of the action. In my case, the guy was violently drunk and took every opportunity to fight whoever was around him. Who's to say that wasn't so in this case.

What's more outrageous to me is the outrage. Armchair cops having purely emotional overreactions to something they find offensive. Some people live a far too comfortable life. :juggle2:

Completely irrelevant, these norwegian officers should be locked up for the rest of their lives for handcuffing and restraining people. Only judges should be allowed to do that.

HoreTore
04-19-2010, 20:50
Yes, there are countries where this is the level of police abuse that shocks public order. :shame:

Which country is that?

I haven't heard of this, therefore it cannot have made much noise.

And I'm betting the only reason you've heard of it is because you look for arrest videos when you do *youknowwhat*

Crazed Rabbit
04-21-2010, 01:53
A cop goes on trial for murder (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/theblotter/2011599979_opening_statements_wednesday_i.html?syn dication=rss), after he stopped and tasered a drunk man in his car in a parking lot. After the guy was tasered the car lurched forward into a fence, and then the cop drew his gun and shot the man in the back seven times.


Troy Meade shot and killed Niles Meservey, 51, last June in the parking lot of the Chuckwagon Inn while Meade was handling a drunken-driving call involving Meservey. Meservey allegedly wouldn't get out of his car. Meade first shot Meservey with a Taser, then Meservey's car, parked between two other cars, lurched forward into a fence, according to charging papers.

According to another Everett officer's account, Meade said something like: "Time to end this; enough is enough," and opened fire, the charging papers say. The other officer also told investigators Meservey posed no immediate threat to anyone in the area.

The cop is on paid administrative leave.

In Florida, a 20 year old prankster rings a doorbell at 1 am and then runs off. The cop living there was off duty, but got in his squad car and chased down the prankster.

And killed him. Shot him to death. (http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20100420/ARTICLE/4201060)


An autopsy on the body of Tyler Spann is complete and he will be buried today, but questions remain about the death of the 20-year-old who was shot and killed early Friday by an off-duty Sarasota County sheriff's deputy.

The Sheriff's Office did not release details about the case Monday, but officials say they expect the investigation into the actions of Deputy Carlos Verdoni, who shot Spann, to be completed by the end of this week.

The inquiry into the shooting is divided into two parts: a criminal investigation of the shooting; and an administrative look at whether Verdoni followed procedures when he left his home in shorts, a T-shirt and sandals to track down the pranksters who banged on his door and ran off.

Verdoni, 33, told his superiors that his doorbell was rung around midnight Thursday, and then he heard banging on his door around 1 a.m. He said he chased down one prankster in his squad car and found him outside a home in the 300 block of Lisbon Street. There he encountered Spann and told him to lay down while he called for backup.

Spann complied initially, Verdoni said, but then rushed up and tackled the deputy and reached for his gun. Verdoni fired two shots, killing Spann, who was unarmed.


Spann's family has doubts about the investigation, especially as the lead criminal investigator -- Lt. Charlie Thorpe -- is listed as a friend of Verdoni's on the social networking site Facebook.

"Nobody from the Sheriff's Office is even talking to this family," said Alan McEwen, Spann's uncle. "This was a prank and the officer goes and shoots the kid?

"Why didn't he handcuff him first? Why wasn't he put in the back of a police car? The officer went overboard and I think he should be charged with murder."

When a Sheriff's spokeswoman, Wendy Rose, was asked about the Facebook connection, she said it was "not a legitimate question."


Sheriff Tom Knight has said that he believes Verdoni's actions were justified and that the investigation will clear the nine-year veteran.

So we have an off duty cop killing a man for ringing a doorbell, the lead investigator is the cop's friend, and the Sheriff says he thinks the investigation will clear the cop for the murder.

Legalized murder.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
05-05-2010, 18:20
A SWAT team bursts into a house, cowards dressed like soldiers, with machine guns and body armor, in the night.

They start shooting with the father, mother, and child in the house because they see a dog and they know they can kill a dog whenever they want to.

And what's the point of all this? A tiny amount of marijuana.

Oh, the cops (who charged in and shot machine guns) also charged the guy with child endangerment for having the tiny amount of pot.

EDIT: SPOILER'D for language.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbwSwvUaRqc&feature=player_embedded#!

CR

Vladimir
05-06-2010, 13:43
It's really weird that they didn't just pick him up when he left his house. He has a child and would eventually go somewhere.

LittleGrizzly
05-07-2010, 17:32
Oh, the cops (who charged in and shot machine guns) also charged the guy with child endangerment for having the tiny amount of pot.

LOL, I always find it funny when people use this line, as if the cops in question don't allow any alcohol or tobacco to even stay in the same house as children in thier family...

Crazed Rabbit
05-08-2010, 21:11
We've come full circle; another Seattle incident, this time of cops detaining a man and forcing him to lay on the ground. Then one said he was going to “beat the ******* Mexican **** out of you”, and kicked the guy in face. (http://www.kirotv.com/investigations/23490010/detail.html) The man was not moving at all or resisting in any way. Then a female cop comes over and stomps on the back of the guy's knee.

Then they eventually released him after they found out he had nothing to do with the crime.


SEATTLE -- City leaders expressed shock and disappointment Friday at video that first aired on KIRO 7 Eyewitness News showing two Seattle police officers kicking a man as he lay on the ground. The man was detained during a robbery investigation last month.

The two officers have been reassigned as police conduct an investigation amid a firestorm of reaction.

The racially charged videotape shows officers stomping on the innocent detainee after they responded to several 911 calls for a report of an armed robbery in the parking lot of a night club near Lake Union.

In the video, a male officer is seen kicking the man who had been ordered to the ground while threatening him with racial slurs. Shortly after, a female officer kicked the man in the back of his leg.
Read First Story, Comments

The man was released when the officers realized he was not involved in the reported crime.

Language Warning:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIJpxyUV5_g&feature=player_embedded#!

Note that most everything happens in the first 1:30.

CR

Strike For The South
05-09-2010, 17:58
http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/6991/corgi.png (http://img39.imageshack.us/i/corgi.png/)
Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

Vladimir
05-11-2010, 17:50
I guess the critics were right. Passing that illegal immigration law did increase racial profiling. Oh, wait!

Crazed Rabbit
06-25-2010, 20:29
A man calls 911 to ask for medical help for his 86 year old, bedridden mother.

Naturally, a bunch of police barge through the door. The woman, a grandmother, tells them to leave her house.

Naturally, the police taze her; (http://www.courthousenews.com/2010/06/24/28330.htm)


The remarkable complaint continues: "Instead, the apparent leader of the police [defendant Thomas Duran] instructed another policeman to 'Taser her!' He stated in his report that the 86 year-old plaintiff 'took a more aggressive posture in her bed,' and that he was fearful for his safety and the safety of others.
"Lonnie Tinsley told them, 'Don't taze my Granny!' to which they responded that they would Taser him; instead, they pulled him out of her apartment, took him down to the floor, handcuffed him and placed him in the back of a police car.
"The police then proceeded to approach Ms. Varner in her bed and stepped on her oxygen hose until she began to suffer oxygen deprivation.
"The police then fired a Taser at her and only one wire struck her, in the left arm; the police then fired a second Taser, striking her to the right and left of the midline of her upper chest and applied high voltage, causing burns to her chest, extreme pain and to pass out.
"The police then grabbed Ms. Varner by her forearms and jerked hands together, causing her soft flesh to tear and bleed on her bed; they then handcuffed her.
"The police freed Lonnie Tinsley from his incarceration in the back of the police car and permitted him to accompany the ambulance with his grandmother."
Tinsley says the cops capped it all off by having his grandmother "placed in the psychiatric ward at the direction of the El Reno police; she was held there for six days and released."

At least the sadists of America have a steady job supply and legal authority to torture people.

It seems some cops view the taser as a tool that lets them have almost as much fun as shooting people without all the bothersome paperwork and inquiries involving murdered people.

CR

Meneldil
06-26-2010, 14:03
Take the arms and start hanging cops on trees. That's pretty much the only solution. Show your governement that you're not going to let your cops act as the Gestapo. If a few innocent people start harming cops, they might start to wonder what's wrong.

Mooks
06-28-2010, 00:03
Take the arms and start hanging cops on trees. That's pretty much the only solution. Show your governement that you're not going to let your cops act as the Gestapo. If a few innocent people start harming cops, they might start to wonder what's wrong.

Thats the spirit!

Vladimir
06-28-2010, 16:51
Take the arms and start hanging cops on trees. That's pretty much the only solution. Show your governement that you're not going to let your cops act as the Gestapo. If a few innocent people start harming cops, they might start to wonder what's wrong.

God bless :france:

Husar
06-29-2010, 00:20
Yeah, if a few cops are being unfair and beat innocent people, the obvious solution is to be unfair and hang some innocent cops on trees because the only possible reaction that could be expected from the government is to back down and tell their cops to be nice to all those "innocent" people who just killed a few cops... :rolleyes:

Mooks
06-29-2010, 02:55
Yeah, if a few cops are being unfair and beat innocent people, the obvious solution is to be unfair and hang some innocent cops on trees because the only possible reaction that could be expected from the government is to back down and tell their cops to be nice to all those "innocent" people who just killed a few cops... :rolleyes:

Meh, define "innocent". Every cop I know of has stolen somebodys marijuana before.

Semantics are fun.

InsaneApache
06-29-2010, 09:39
Not so much individual abuse, more institutional....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQucfv0slOE&feature=player_embedded#!

9/11 really was a politicians wet dream. They've been wanting to shut us up for decades. Now they have a reason.

I'm ashamed of my country. :shame:

Husar
06-29-2010, 09:40
Meh, define "innocent". Every cop I know of has stolen somebodys marijuana before.

Semantics are fun.

So if that justifies hanging the cops, then I guess possessing marijuana and doing filesharing justify the cops in beating and tasing people? How many people do you know who bought all their music?
I meant innocent more in the sense that they did not harm someone's body for fun and do not deserve to be hanged/beaten up by any reasonable standard.

Ser Clegane
06-29-2010, 12:26
I would highly appreciate if this thread would not be used to fantasize about the killing of policemen.

Thanks

ELITEofWARMANGINGERYBREADMEN88
06-29-2010, 19:23
So if a black man attacks a cop, that is ok, but if he fights back and defends himself, he is a racist! How funny! :laugh:

Ser Clegane
06-29-2010, 19:32
So if a black man attacks a cop, that is ok, but if he fights back and defends himself, he is a racist! How funny! :laugh:

I think I am not quite sure what this conclusion is based on...

Mooks
06-30-2010, 05:17
So if that justifies hanging the cops, then I guess possessing marijuana and doing filesharing justify the cops in beating and tasing people? How many people do you know who bought all their music?
I meant innocent more in the sense that they did not harm someone's body for fun and do not deserve to be hanged/beaten up by any reasonable standard.

I never said it justified. Im just displaying my point of view, cops steal stuff from people all the time.

ELITEofWARMANGINGERYBREADMEN88
06-30-2010, 17:13
I think I am not quite sure what this conclusion is based on...

Some local cases that transpired in the Pittsburgh area.

Vladimir
07-02-2010, 17:40
A man calls 911 to ask for medical help for his 86 year old, bedridden mother.

Naturally, a bunch of police barge through the door. The woman, a grandmother, tells them to leave her house.

Naturally, the police taze her; (http://www.courthousenews.com/2010/06/24/28330.htm)



At least the sadists of America have a steady job supply and legal authority to torture people.

It seems some cops view the taser as a tool that lets them have almost as much fun as shooting people without all the bothersome paperwork and inquiries involving murdered people.

CR

I killed four Japs in World War II, (http://www.newser.com/story/94203/tasered-granny-sues-town.html)

Don't trust the rabbit. There's always more to the story.

Crazed Rabbit
07-03-2010, 07:33
I killed four Japs in World War II, (http://www.newser.com/story/94203/tasered-granny-sues-town.html)

Don't trust the rabbit. There's always more to the story.


An officer used the Taser when she pulled a kitchen knife out from under her pillow and threatened cops with it, police said.

Well golly gee, if the police said it then it must be true. It's not like they've ever systematically lied to cover up crimes up to and including murder whenever they have to.

I'm just glad we can put this story to rest, and not worry about niggling little holes like why even a knife wielding granny who couldn't get out of bed had to be tasered even assuming the police aren't lying, just because the police said their violent acts were justified.

After all, if we don't blindly trust violent men when they say they had to be violent, we might have to face uncomfortable facts.

CR

Seamus Fermanagh
07-03-2010, 17:48
The ultimate "point" of this thread still escapes me.

Are there police abuses? Yes. Are efforts to curb such abuses less effective than we would like? Yes. Taking these as givens, what should be done about it?

Do we abolish police in favor of personal self-defense only?

Do we retire police after just a few years service to prevent them from acquiring too much power/too much interest in securing themselves?

Do we pick people who don't want to be police and force them to serve as police?


Consider the following...

No matter how thoroughly we screen for things at the outset, some people will discover while doing police work that they LIKE using the baton and cracking a few heads to achieve their objective. Moreover, it is hardly surprising that people who do like that approach to problem-solving self-select into a career path that allows for (encourages?) it. This is human nature. A goodly percentage of us, given power by situation or by assignment, ENJOY exercising that power.

So what is to be done?

Tiaexz
07-03-2010, 17:52
Police here are like angels of Justice, mostly.

Crazed Rabbit
07-17-2010, 21:23
A schoolteacher calls cops to her house because of a prowler.

Naturally it all ends in the cops repeatedly tasering her as she is curled on the ground in pain, because she had the gall to not be completely submissive in response to his questions.

Story and video here. (http://www.ajc.com/news/22-officers-out-of-568967.html) Video at CNN here. (http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/crime/2010/07/15/sot.ricks.georgia.woman.tasered.cnn?hpt=C2)

One of the cops has been given a paid vacation until it blows over, while the other quit before an investigation and has already been hired by a different police force.

CR

Louis VI the Fat
07-18-2010, 01:51
Take the arms and start hanging cops on trees
God bless :france:Ho hum...



A man, trice convicted of armed robbery, robbed a casino. Taking €40000 / $50000 he and his accomplices fled by car. The police followed suit in a chase. After being shot at three times, the police returned fire, killing the man.

Naturally, civil war ensued. The intifada broke out immediately after the memorial service for this brutally violent serial armed robber. The once quiet university city of Grenoble is on fire as we speak, a full intifada in retaliation for 'taking one of them',



60 cars burned, shops looted and burned, and police repeatedly fired at with automatic weapons by the insurgents. A horde of thirthy insurgents armed with clubs and iron bars attacked a tram full of people.

Five arrests were made.



:furious3:



http://www.france24.com/en/20100717-grenoble-france-riots-fatal-shooting-police-fire-robbing-casino

InsaneApache
07-24-2010, 22:57
http://www.metro.co.uk/news/831163-policeman-demanded-sex-to-let-women-off-traffic-fines

Nice guy.

As Peel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Peel) rightly said; "The police are the public and the public are the police".*

As such bastards and bullys get in. As in all walks of life. :shame:

* tested to destruction these last 25 years.

Meneldil
07-25-2010, 01:15
Ho hum...



A man, trice convicted of armed robbery, robbed a casino. Taking €40000 / $50000 he and his accomplices fled by car. The police followed suit in a chase. After being shot at three times, the police returned fire, killing the man.

Naturally, civil war ensued. The intifada broke out immediately after the memorial service for this brutally violent serial armed robber. The once quiet university city of Grenoble is on fire as we speak, a full intifada in retaliation for 'taking one of them',



60 cars burned, shops looted and burned, and police repeatedly fired at with automatic weapons by the insurgents. A horde of thirthy insurgents armed with clubs and iron bars attacked a tram full of people.

Five arrests were made.

We're clearly in another case entirely. It's ridiculous that thieves and criminals who died after being pursued by the cops are seen as victims by the scums that plague France.

Remember the riots of 2005? I clearly stated back then that the army should have been sent to deal - violently - with the scumbags who thought it was fun to burn their neighbour's car and school. I still think it.

Demetrius Scholarius
07-25-2010, 14:31
Ho hum...



A man, trice convicted of armed robbery, robbed a casino. Taking €40000 / $50000 he and his accomplices fled by car. The police followed suit in a chase. After being shot at three times, the police returned fire, killing the man.

Naturally, civil war ensued. The intifada broke out immediately after the memorial service for this brutally violent serial armed robber. The once quiet university city of Grenoble is on fire as we speak, a full intifada in retaliation for 'taking one of them',



60 cars burned, shops looted and burned, and police repeatedly fired at with automatic weapons by the insurgents. A horde of thirthy insurgents armed with clubs and iron bars attacked a tram full of people.

Five arrests were made.



:furious3:



http://www.france24.com/en/20100717-grenoble-france-riots-fatal-shooting-police-fire-robbing-casino

Oh, I love those french riots on TV, only wouldn't like it if I lived there and it was my car they torched and danced upon with scimitars. Or my shop that was being destroyed Kristallnacht style, but is is good television.

Louis VI the Fat
07-25-2010, 17:46
Well I'm happy the misfortune of people at least provides entertainment for this world's psychopaths.

Crazed Rabbit
08-09-2010, 22:13
I feel ill after reading this article (http://reason.com/archives/2010/08/09/police-officers-dont-check-the), and the opinions of prosecutors and police on citizens recording police:

The debate over whether citizens should be permitted to record on-duty police officers intensified this summer. High profile incidents in Maryland, Illinois, Florida, Ohio, and elsewhere spurred coverage of the issue from national media outlets ranging from the Associated Press to Time to NPR.
...
But so far, there’s been little activity in state legislatures to prevent these arrests. That’s likely because any policy that makes recording cops an explicitly legal endeavor is likely to encounter strong opposition from law enforcement organizations.
...
Joseph Cassilly is the Harford County, Maryland state’s attorney. He’s currently pursuing felony charges against Anthony Graber, who was arrested last April for recording a police officer during a traffic stop. Maryland is one of 12 states that require all parties to a conversation to give consent before the conversation can legally be recorded. But like nine of those 12 states, Maryland also requires that for the recording to be illegal, the offended party must have had an expectation that the conversation would be private. To bring charges against Graber, Cassilly would not only need to believe that on-duty police officers have privacy rights, but in the Graber case in particular, that a cop who had drawn his gun and was yelling at a motorist on the side of a busy highway would, also, have good reason to believe the entire encounter was private. This seems all the more absurd given that motorists in such a situation clearly don’t have any reasonable privacy expectation. Anything they say during such a traffic stop is admissible in court.

"The officer having his gun drawn or being on a public roadway has nothing to do with it," Cassilly says. "Neither does the fact that what Mr. Graber said during the stop could be used in court. That’s not the test. The test is whether police officers can expect some of the conversations they have while on the job to remain private and not be recorded and replayed for the world to hear."
...
Crawford County State’s Attorney Tom Wiseman is currently bringing five felony charges against Michael Allison, a 41-year-old construction worker who recorded police officers and other public officials he thought were harassing him.
...
[S]o he began recording his conversations with local law enforcement. He faces up to 75 years in prison for the recordings.

...

"The only person doing any harassing here is Mr. Allison, who was harassing our public officials with his tape recorder," Wiseman says. "They may have problems with some bad police officers in some of your urban areas. But we don’t have those problems around here. All of our cops around here are good cops. This is a small town. Everyone knows everyone. If we had a bad police officer here, we’d know about it, I’d know about it, and he’d be out. There’s just no reason for anyone to feel they need to record police officers in Crawford County."

...

Finally, I spoke with Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police.
...
Pasco says. "Letting people record police officers is an extreme and intrusive response to a problem that’s so rare it might as well not exist. It would be like saying we should do away with DNA evidence because there’s a one in a billion chance that it could be wrong. At some point, we have to put some faith and trust in our authority figures."
...
I mention Michael Allison’s case to Pasco, and ask if he supports the Illinois law.

"I don’t know anything about that case, but generally it sounds like a sensible law and a sensible punishment," Pasco says. "Police officers don’t check their civil rights at the station house door."


Scum.

Crazed Rabbit
08-15-2010, 01:07
Denver, this time. (http://www.denverpost.com/ci_15772710) A cop is arresting someone at night. Several people stand nearby. A different cop goes up to one of them, a man talking on his cell phone, and punches him in the face, before throwing him to the ground and repeatedly hitting him with his baton.

The standard lying on the report happens, once again exposed by video, this time from a government, police operated camera. Video and article at the link. Note how the camera pans away as the officer starts attacking the bystander. The camera operator is trying to protect his fellow cop by not recording evidence.


Denver officials are deeply divided over the proper level of punishment for a police officer who was seen on video tackling and beating a 23-year-old man who was doing nothing but talking on a telephone outside a LoDo nightclub.

The video of Officer Devin Sparks repeatedly hitting Michael DeHerrera of Denver with a department-issued piece of metal wrapped in leather, picking him up roughly and slamming a car door on his ankle has prompted Independent Monitor Richard Rosenthal to push for the firing of Sparks and Corporal Randy Murr.

Rosenthal, who monitors police internal investigations, maintains Sparks and Murr are unfit for the force because they didn't tell the truth about the April 4, 2009 incident. Rosenthal also believes the use of force by Sparks was excessive. The Denver City Council earlier this year agreed to pay $17,500 to settle a federal lawsuit brought by DeHerrera alleging excessive force.

DeHerrera, in interviews, has described police as beating him unconscious. He said he woke up in a hospital bed, with stitches in his head, and a swollen head. He said he later was diagnosed with post-concussion syndrome.

"The video was so important because it showed everything that happened, regardless of reports or what's filled out," DeHerrera said in an interview. "The video speaks more than any of those words can."

He added: "I don't swing. I don't blade. I'm on the phone. The only thing I hold onto is my phone. When I go down, I'm out, and that's when he continues to 'get my compliance.'"

The incident was filmed by the police department's own High Activity Location Observation video surveillance system. Video released to the news media by the department shows DeHerrera doing nothing but talking on his phone with his father, a sheriff's deputy in Pueblo.

Rosenthal, in a report to be released on Monday, labels as "pure fiction" the police report from Sparks that describes his force as justified because DeHerrera "spun to his left attempting to strike me in the face with a closed right fist."

Safety Manager Ron Perea, who oversees the police department and has final say on discipline, has rejected Rosenthal's argument that the officers should be fired. He suspended Murr without pay for three days for submitting an "inaccurate report." Sparks also lost three days pay.

Gee, what other job could lead to only losing three days pay for assaulting someone and then filing a false police report?

CR

Major Robert Dump
08-15-2010, 05:02
Well, as stated in the previous post, the problem is "so rare" it might as well not exist and you might as well not worry about it.

Sasaki Kojiro
08-15-2010, 05:20
The ultimate "point" of this thread still escapes me.

Are there police abuses? Yes. Are efforts to curb such abuses less effective than we would like? Yes. Taking these as givens, what should be done about it?

Do we abolish police in favor of personal self-defense only?

Do we retire police after just a few years service to prevent them from acquiring too much power/too much interest in securing themselves?

Do we pick people who don't want to be police and force them to serve as police?

I guess we work out the law regarding recording police officers better, and such things.


I have seen plenty of fake scandals caused by people who are anti-police though. Definitely a two sided problem. I think it was CR who posted one of those in the BR video thread.

Tiaexz
08-15-2010, 10:05
I have seen plenty of fake scandals caused by people who are anti-police though. Definitely a two sided problem. I think it was CR who posted one of those in the BR video thread.

Yeah, there are plently of fakes. :no:

Crazed Rabbit
08-28-2010, 02:46
I don't think there's two sides to the recording police issue at all. So far, videos of the police have revealed brutality and protected the innocent victims of police. I've heard of no video that was doctored and ended up doing harm to police.

And even if such people might think of doing that; that's why we have trials, so the people can determine if something is real or fake.

In news from Indianapolis, (http://www.indystar.com/article/99999999/news06/100813056) David Bisard gets away with murder after killing a stopped motorcyclist at an intersection with a BAC of .19 (tested two hours after the crash), ie at least ten drinks. But since the wrong hospital employee drew his blood, that evidence is inadmissible.

And the murderer supporters, ie fellow cops at the scene, didn't notice that he was drunk at all at the crash scene. So he faces charges that are much lower than if there was some admissible evidence he was really drunk.

In North Carolina, (http://www.salisburypost.com/Opinion/082610-edit-resisting-arrest-qcd) police arrest a woman for resisting arrest because she watched, and recorded, a traffic stop from her front porch.

CR

InsaneApache
09-06-2010, 11:30
A 57 year old woman has a row with her boyfriend and walks out in a huff. She decides against driving to her daughters in London, instead sleeping overnight in her car. In the morning two plastic pigs investigate the car and call for (the real) police to attend.

She's arrested for apparently refusing a breath test. Now in the UK the police need a reason to breathalyse you. They can't just decide to.

Understandably she's upset and wants to know why they arrested her.

What happened next?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GDlGqAbbN4&feature=player_embedded

At least the sergeant was prosecuted, unlike those numpties who chased a disabled man and smashed his windscreen in for taking them on a 30 MPH chase.

I was stopped by plod t'other week. My those young whippersnappers are aggressive. :shame:

Crazed Rabbit
09-28-2010, 01:19
In Spokane, WA, police shoot an unarmed, pregnant woman (http://www.thenewstribune.com/2010/09/25/1356027/state-patrol-officer-shoots-pregnant.html) because she was 'noncompliant' and 'trying to escape'.

A pregnant, unarmed woman was shot during a drug raid in Spokane on Friday morning and she remained hospitalized late last night as investigators pieced together what happened in the county's third officer-involved shooting in four weeks.

A Washington State Patrol detective sergeant shot the woman, who according to the sheriff's spokesman is 39 weeks pregnant, while serving a search warrant at the Victoria Apartments, 1405 N. Lincoln St., according to the Spokane County Sheriff's Office.

The Sheriff's Office is investigating the shooting along with members of the Spokane Police Department and the WSP.

Sheriff's Office spokesman Sgt. Dave Reagan confirmed that officers found no weapons in the home but did find quantities of drugs during the execution of the search warrant.

"During the entry, a female suspect inside the apartment became non-compliant with officers' instructions," Reagan wrote in a news release. "When she attempted to flee out a bedroom window, officers attempted to restrain her. During efforts to prevent her escape, a shot was fired and the woman suffered a minor wound to her upper torso. She fell out the window and received first aid from containment officers stationed at the back of the apartments."

He offered no further details about why the detective used deadly force.

CR

drone
09-28-2010, 16:10
I feel ill after reading this article (http://reason.com/archives/2010/08/09/police-officers-dont-check-the), and the opinions of prosecutors and police on citizens recording police:

...
Joseph Cassilly is the Harford County, Maryland state’s attorney. He’s currently pursuing felony charges against Anthony Graber, who was arrested last April for recording a police officer during a traffic stop. Maryland is one of 12 states that require all parties to a conversation to give consent before the conversation can legally be recorded. But like nine of those 12 states, Maryland also requires that for the recording to be illegal, the offended party must have had an expectation that the conversation would be private. To bring charges against Graber, Cassilly would not only need to believe that on-duty police officers have privacy rights, but in the Graber case in particular, that a cop who had drawn his gun and was yelling at a motorist on the side of a busy highway would, also, have good reason to believe the entire encounter was private. This seems all the more absurd given that motorists in such a situation clearly don’t have any reasonable privacy expectation. Anything they say during such a traffic stop is admissible in court.

"The officer having his gun drawn or being on a public roadway has nothing to do with it," Cassilly says. "Neither does the fact that what Mr. Graber said during the stop could be used in court. That’s not the test. The test is whether police officers can expect some of the conversations they have while on the job to remain private and not be recorded and replayed for the world to hear."
...

The county Circuit Court judge dismissed the charges yesterday.
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/local-breaking-news/maryland/charges-dropped-in-cyclist-tro.html?hpid=sec-metro

One of the key legal questions facing Judge Emory A. Pitt Jr., was whether police performing their duties have an expectation of privacy. Pitt ruled that police have no expectation of privacy in their public, on-the-job communications.

Pitt wrote: "Those of us who are public officials and are entrusted with the power of the state are ultimately accountable to the public. When we exercise that power in public fora, we should not expect our actions to be shielded from public observation. 'Sed quis custodiet ipsos cutodes' ("Who watches the watchmen?”)."

Graber was also charged with possessing a “device primarily useful for the purpose of the surreptitious interception of oral communications" -- referring to the video camera on his helmet. The judge disagreed with the prosecutor that the helmet cam was illegal, and concluded the state's argument would render illegal “almost every cell phone, Blackberry, and every similar device, not to mention dictation equipment and other types of recording devices."

No word yet on whether the state's attorney will try to appeal the decision. Graber still faces traffic charges.

Pitt's decision is the first ruling in Maryland to address the legality of citizens taping police in the course of their duties. Because it is a circuit court ruling, it is not binding on other judges. However, unless it is appealed, Graber's attorney David Rocah of the ACLU of Maryland, said "it is likely to be the last word" on the matter and regarded as precedent by police.
Nice to see there is still a little common sense in Maryland.

caravel
09-28-2010, 17:00
This is how you get the police to attend:

http://img408.imageshack.us/img408/5647/newspapermv.jpg

Crazed Rabbit
10-01-2010, 02:04
The county Circuit Court judge dismissed the charges yesterday.
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/local-breaking-news/maryland/charges-dropped-in-cyclist-tro.html?hpid=sec-metro

Nice to see there is still a little common sense in Maryland.

A little justice, but not enough. The police invaded his home, seized his belongings, and charged him with a crime because they misunderstood the law. But they will face no discipline whatsoever.

In other news, the victim of a federal agent's road rage seven years ago recently got a huge payout. A DEA agent, Timothy McCue, in an unmarked car collided with someone. Once both cars were stopped, the agent got out, gun in hand, and beat the other driver, Barron Bowling, to unconsciousness.

The police arrived and immediately began covering up the beating; by not recording witness statements, taking pictures of the injured man, etc. They then charged the victim with a couple crimes.

Seven years later, only one man in the police department was punished - the one officer who exposed the coverup, Max Seifert: (http://www.kansascity.com/2010/09/25/2250584/exposing-agent-costs-kck-detective.html)

Seifert’s troubles began seven years ago after Drug Enforcement Administration agent Timothy McCue tried to pass Bowling on the right in a wide lane. Bowling sped up and the cars collided.

Bowling drove forward before he pulled over so he wouldn’t block traffic, the judge wrote. That’s when McCue, gun out, rushed him. Bowling was beaten unconscious by McCue and then taken to jail.

The case ended with the recent order for the U.S. government to pay Bowling for McCue’s actions, but a previous ruling outlined allegations against the Kansas City, Kan., Police Department.

The Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kan., settled its part of the case last year for $425,000 but admitted no liability on conspiracy, malicious prosecution or abuse of process.

Before that settlement, the judge issued the pretrial ruling that described how Seifert was pressured to play along with a cover-up that started soon after the crash. Officers at the crash scene failed to report or photograph Bowling’s injuries or report what witnesses said, the judge wrote.

Instead, Police Officer Robert Lane told Bowling he was going to jail because DEA agents “do pretty much whatever they want,” the judge wrote.

Bowling was accused of assaulting DEA agents by intentionally causing the crash, and Lane ordered a reporting officer to omit the evidence of the beating and witnesses’ statements, Robinson wrote.

After Seifert spoke to Bowling in jail, though, the detective told a boss that internal affairs should take the case instead. Seifert got it anyway and called Lane to ask why there were no witness reports.

“It would look bad for DEA agents,” Lane replied, according to the judge’s report, adding that police “should cover for them.”

Seifert still proceeded to record interviews with three witnesses who confirmed the beating, but the judge later noted that the tape mysteriously disappeared after Seifert turned it over to superiors.

Deputy Chief Steven Culp told Seifert he should investigate only the alleged car assault on McCue, the judge wrote, not the accusation of beating.

Seifert finished his investigation and submitted it to prosecutors. They declined to charge Bowling.

But Culp — who discussed the case over golf with a special agent in charge at the DEA — later gave the prosecutor more statements from the DEA agents and urged charges, the judge stated.

The prosecutor ended up charging Bowling with felony criminal damage to property and the misdemeanors of leaving the scene of an accident and possessing drug paraphernalia, a marijuana pipe.

Throughout the case, Culp and Maj. Dennis Ware managed it for police, the judge wrote. Police Chief Ronald Miller got updates from them but was not directly involved.

In a sworn statement for Bowling’s civil case, Seifert said his bosses managed a cover-up.

“I’ve never seen Col. Culp walk into my office and take such an interest in a case. … I’ve never been paid visits by Maj. Ware like they were.”

In the end, the judge said, the criminal case was based on McCue’s false statement that Bowling intentionally hit the DEA car, when McCue was the one who had tried to force his way into traffic.

Seifert testified for the defense at Bowling’s criminal trial, where jurors found the man not guilty of the felony, but convicted him on the misdemeanors.

But to police, the judge said, the detective was guilty.

Seifert said in the sworn statement, taken shortly before his retirement, that police started an internal affairs investigation of him and Miller made it clear he was unhappy with him.

Miller told him that he alone would determine whether Seifert got a reserve commission to do police work after he retired, Seifert said, which is something that officers typically rely on. He didn’t get it.

Seifert, 60, and his wife still live in Kansas City, Kan. His wife said he was forced to retire less than a year before he would have been fully vested. That meant the detective who helped solve the 1997 torture and killing of Scruffy the dog — whose case led to “Scruffy’s Law” — lost health insurance and 2.5 percent off his pension, she said.

Jody Boeding, chief counsel for the Unified Government, said the government “respectfully disagrees with Judge Robinson’s conclusions about the actions of the police commanders” and believes they acted appropriately.

Miller has left the force and is now the police chief in Topeka. He did not return phone calls.

As for Lane, he became an Edwardsville councilman. He left the Police Department in 2007 after he pleaded no contest to four misdemeanors associated with a drunken-driving ticket-fixing scheme. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail and probation and is no longer on the council. He could not be reached for comment.

Culp is now the executive director of the Kansas Commission on Peace Officers’ Standards and Training. He declined to comment on details of the judicial rulings, which he said he had not read.

Ware has retired from the force and now works for the police in a civilian capacity. He did not reply to an e-mail request for comment.

Kansas City, Kan., Police Chief Rick Armstrong said the judge’s depiction of the case does not reflect past or current attitudes in the Police Department.

“This Police Department vigorously investigates allegations of misconduct,” he said.

Wyandotte County prosecutors declined to comment.

McCue is still a DEA agent, a spokesperson said. The DEA and federal attorneys representing the agency declined comment. They said they are still studying the ruling.


You know, some mafia thug may viciously attack you in a road rage incident, and get away unpunished. But even organized crime couldn't get you charged with a crime. I guess it just shows who's part of the really organized crime.

CR

Vladimir
10-01-2010, 13:11
Good. I hate it when people speed up when I'm trying to pass them.

That's illegal, you know. :yes:

Crazed Rabbit
10-02-2010, 04:38
Good. I hate it when people speed up when I'm trying to pass them.

That's illegal, you know. :yes:

And road rage attacks aren't?

EDIT: And attempted passing on right is also illegal. Perhaps you could explain why its good that innocent people are brutally beaten for not actually doing anything illegal - since the attempted pass was on the right - while psychotic federal agents and corrupt police go unpunished.

CR

Tiaexz
10-02-2010, 19:58
This is why civilized 'socialist' countries have Independent Police Complaint Commissions (http://www.ipcc.gov.uk/) and don't have millions of different agencies.

Crazed Rabbit
11-25-2010, 15:16
/\ You'd think that would be common sense...

This cop hung his dog by a leash completely off the ground and proceeded to kick him because the dog wouldn't give up a chew toy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwD_f5QICnI&feature=player_embedded

The officer said he 'loved' that dog. Imagine what he'd do to some stranger who wouldn't give him what he wanted.

He was fired for this abuse (http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/6748627/), but thanks to the police union a judge ordered that he be rehired (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/11/23/1860922/nc-judge-orders-rehiring-of-fired.html).

CR

Crazed Rabbit
11-26-2010, 15:46
Man gets attacked by violent cops in Miami, apparently looking for someone in a large Halloween crowd to vent their rage on. The attack get's videotaped and put on youtube, and the department starts an investigation.

The victim was charged with several crimes, but they were dropped after the publicity.

Except for one - the charge of "resisting arrest without violence". (http://cbs4.com/local/you.tube.miami.2.2022255.html) Apparently, to cover your head with your hands as you lay defenseless on the ground while several police officers pound on you is resisting arrest.

Maybe the prosecutor just wanted to send a message about getting back at those who embarrass the department.

CR

The Stranger
11-27-2010, 11:21
You should read more.

That's a rather baseless charge founded on an incomplete story. We don't even know what the mother was charged/convicted of.

Don't tell me that you see a brown woman and assume there is racism involved. That's pretty racist itself.

does it matter? and if so why does it matter? lets assume she was arrested for being illegal? and the assume she was arrested for stealing, and in the last case murder. why would she have to be treated different in any of these circumstances?

Crazed Rabbit
01-30-2011, 01:36
There's so much stuff but updating this thread is majorly depressing.

First, a high schooler thrown in jail for seven months for recording an officer (http://www.laweekly.com/2010-12-09/news/jeremy-marks-attempted-lynching-case/) in an altercation with some other kid - he was in jail awaiting trial with $155,000 bail. He was offered a plea bargain for 32 months in jail in exchange for pleading guilty (lower than the first offer of seven years). He only gets out for Christmas because a nice Google engineer (http://www.laweekly.com/2010-12-09/news/jeremy-marks-attempted-lynching-case/) sprang for the bail bondsmen fee (10% of bail).

But the LAPD wasn't sated. On 1/26/11 they raided the kid's home with a full SWAT team (http://www.pslweb.org/liberationnews/news/jeremy-marks-home-raided.html) to gather 'evidence' about the May 2010 recording - by taking all computers, cell phones, cameras, papers -including communications with attorneys police cannot look at.

In short, the LAPD is using gestapo tactics to put fear into those who legally defy them. They are a criminal organization.

In New Jersey some cops threaten to assault a man and throw him in jail (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn1mgZaQZPQ) for legally filming them in public.

The police commander from Chicago who tortured suspects and put innocent people into jail (http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/ex-top_cop/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=ABA+Journal+Daily+News&utm_content=Twitter)got 4.5 years - and his pension - after being convicted of perjury. The statue of limitations had expired for the torture charges because the mayor, other police, and all other authorities simply ignored that it was going on.

Cop arrests/sexually assaults a woman for talking back to him on the DC Metro:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qe_IQDOvp2o&feature=player_embedded

Cops do a SWAT raid on a suspected drug user - at night, breaking into his house - (article) and end up killing him (http://www.standard.net/topics/drugs/2010/10/29/family-planning-lawsuit-prevent-repeat-drug-raid-shooting-death). They find him holding a golf club, and (video) shoot him down without mercy (http://www.youtube.com/v/WV6Bq8xeQrU&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3). WARNING: This video shows the man being killed.

CR

Louis VI the Fat
01-30-2011, 02:18
There's so much stuff but updating this thread is majorly depressing.

First, a high schooler thrown in jail for seven months for recording an officer (http://www.laweekly.com/2010-12-09/news/jeremy-marks-attempted-lynching-case/) in an altercation with some other kid - he was in jail awaiting trial with $155,000 bail. He was offered a plea bargain for 32 months in jail in exchange for pleading guilty (lower than the first offer of seven years). He only gets out for Christmas because a nice Google engineer (http://www.laweekly.com/2010-12-09/news/jeremy-marks-attempted-lynching-case/) sprang for the bail bondsmen fee (10% of bail).

But the LAPD wasn't sated. On 1/26/11 they raided the kid's home with a full SWAT team (http://www.pslweb.org/liberationnews/news/jeremy-marks-home-raided.html) to gather 'evidence' about the May 2010 recording - by taking all computers, cell phones, cameras, papers -including communications with attorneys police cannot look at.

In short, the LAPD is using gestapo tactics to put fear into those who legally defy them. They are a criminal organization.This is much worse than the mere sexual assaults and murders by cops, which apparantly are standard fare.

A police force that abuses it powers, its monopoly on violence, to protects its own - that's a state within a state. Authoritarianism replacing the rule of law. They are waging revolutions over exactly this sort of thing in Tunesia and Egypt right now. :no:

Greyblades
01-30-2011, 02:21
Lethal force used for a raid on only one druggy? What?! This sounds like the sort of thing south park would make to make fun of smaller situations.

Crazed Rabbit
01-30-2011, 03:48
Greyblades: that's standard practice in the US. The war on drug users is very literal in the US. These raids occur thousands of times per state per year. Some counties use the SWAT team to serve every single warrant. They break down doors, throw flashbang grenades, come in full body armor and machine guns in the middle of the night, and generally shoot any dogs they see on sight. There are no public records available on how many raids occurred, or what warrants they were serving. People are dying so cops can play dress up and pretend they're soldiers. Except the US army doesn't act so trigger happy.

Here's a limited map of innocent people killed (http://www.cato.org/raidmap/index.php?type=1#)by such raids:
http://assets.theagitator.com/wp-content/uploads/CM-Capture-32.jpg

CR

Greyblades
01-30-2011, 14:52
But shouldn't they at least give them tazers or tear gas instead of freaking machine guns until there is confirmation of deadly weapons?

ajaxfetish
01-30-2011, 23:32
But shouldn't they at least give them tazers or tear gas instead of freaking machine guns until there is confirmation of deadly weapons?
I'm sure there are plenty of options for sanity. Some police departments just seem determined not to take them. Ultimately, greater police accountability (instead of policies or laws against filming police, etc.) and an end to the 'war on drugs' would probably provide the most improvement.

Ajax

PershsNhpios
01-31-2011, 08:39
That is absolutely disgusting.

I am definitely advocant of the right to bear and use arms as a civilian, and I do, but we in Australia thought it was a hell of a lot more relaxed over there than that evidence shows.

It seems the floodgates for your S.W.A.T. recruitment were opened wide and not only has that rapidly decreased quality in personnel but also created a monster of corruption...

Good luck, and take a page out of Egypt's book.

Husar
01-31-2011, 10:28
You know what our police did when I reported the guy who robbed me? One officer stood next to him and talked to him.
That's it, no tazing, no violently throwing him to the ground, yelling loud and handcuffing him or any of that macho stuff.
And I'm still proud of our police, they solve our criminal problems without the macho attitude. :2thumbsup:

They put a lot of emphasis on talking skills here, I took a small test to determine whether a police career would suit me and a lot of the questions were about whether I would think I could defuse a certain situation verbally. Not by yelling at people with mah authoritay, then tazing them and handcuffing them while pressing their face onto the floor. :no:

America's police desperately needs some reforms, this kind of behaviour is unacceptable, I think it mostly doesn't happen here because there is a somewhat different police culture here and the courts and the law don't back the police up all the time when they do nasty things. As ajax said, the law against videotaping police and probably a few others need to be revoked and the courts should side with the law, not the police.
The guy with the bat wasn't even close to the officer and stopped when he saw who was coming in. Still seems stupid to take a bat when someone yells "police!" though. :shrug:

Crazed Rabbit
03-13-2011, 08:36
Note: Carrying a pocket knife in Seattle is punishable by on-the-spot execution (http://www.seattlepi.com/local/432014_williams18.html?source=mypi):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1VKo6-m27c&feature=player_embedded

And even though the SPD ruled the shooting unjustified (http://www.seattlepi.com/local/435593_policechief.html), the officer will not face any legal charges.

CR

Major Robert Dump
03-14-2011, 00:52
IIRC, the guy was also hearing impaired and could not hear the cop yelling at him....and he was shot as he turned around to face the cop from 10 feet away.

Crazed Rabbit
03-15-2011, 07:36
As a general rule, police departments protect guilty cops and punish those who try to expose the guilty.

In this case a cop who maneuvered in a way to possibly kill a motorcyclist for speeding obstructed justice by not taking witness statements incriminating them.

The police chief who eventually found out about it and recommended the cops be fired was suspended - and one of the would be killers promoted to acting chief by the city council.

http://www.startribune.com/local/west/117445218.html

Criminal organizations.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
04-24-2011, 08:12
A Las Vegas cop fresh from training in North Korea:
http://www.lvrj.com/news/exclusive-police-beating-of-las-vegas-man-caught-on-tape-120509439.html?viewAllComments=y&c=y


EDIT: Awards for cops who kill innocents:
http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2011/04/13/cop-who-shot-and-killed-pace-university-student-named-officer-of-the-year/

http://www.lvrj.com/news/national-police-group-honors-two-officers-involved-in-erik-scott-shooting-119926284.html

Widespread NYPD corruption:
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504083_162-20054908-504083.html

Brutish cop in Seattle:
http://www.komonews.com/news/local/120521724.html

CR

Louis VI the Fat
05-04-2011, 03:56
Might as well dump this here, to lighten up the thread a bit:






French riot police have threatened to strike over a ban on drinking alcohol with their meals while on duty.

Up until now officers have always been allowed beer or wine during crowd-control operations.
Such events include soccer games or demonstrations.

However the French interior ministry now wants that to stop.
The national secretary of the French police union has accused the ministry of trying to turn officers into “priests”.

Didier Mangione has also defended the right of his members to a “small quarter-litre of red to accompany meals on the ground”.
According to French law alcohol is banned while employees are at work with the exception of ‘wine, beer, apple cider and pear cider’.
But it is thought that images of riot police drinking beer on the sidelines of a student demonstration in 2010 provoked anger from officials.
http://www.newstalk.ie/2011/news/french-riot-police-threaten-to-strike-over-their-wine/


Does this mean no more drunk riot police beating up stoned protesters? What has become of the spirit of 1968? :no:

Crazed Rabbit
05-04-2011, 04:19
A teen wears saggy pants after school, police taser, beat him, and break his arm:
(http://www.kansas.com/2011/04/28/1827093/derby-teen-says-officers-injured.html)

Derby student says cops used Taser, broke his arm because of sagging pants
BY FRED MANN
The Wichita Eagle

DERBY — A Derby High School sophomore said today that he was hit by a Taser and had his arm broken by two school resource officers for refusing to pull up his pants.
The Derby Police Department said it will investigate the incident. The officers work for the department.
The teen and the Police Department offered differing accounts of what happened.
Jonathan Villarreal, 17, said he was walking with friends to the bus after school on Wednesday when one of the officers ordered him to pull up his pants. He told them he could wear them how he wanted because school was out, he said.
Villarreal said he had pulled his jeans low on his hips, as is fashionable among some young men, after leaving the school.
He said one of the officers, a man who was larger than him, pulled him to the ground by the neck and told him to stop resisting arrest. Villarreal denied he was resisting.
Both officers kneed him in the back and neck while he was on the ground, he said.
Because they were physical with him, he struggled to get up, but was pushed back down, he said.
At one point as he tried to get up, Villarreal said he felt his arm break when he was pushed back down.
After Villarreal tried three times to get up, one officer fired a Taser at his chest, he said. Although he was wearing a heavy coat, he still felt an electrical shock, he said.
Villarreal said the officers handcuffed him in spite of his complaints about pain in his arm, and kept him handcuffed until paramedics arrived and ordered the cuffs removed.
During the altercation, he said, an officer struck him in the eye, which was swollen shut.
Villarreal was taken by ambulance to a hospital, treated and released.
Derby Police Chief Robert Lee said Villarreal used profanities when the officers asked him to pull up his pants.
Lee also said the officers tried to escort Villarreal back inside the school to the office, but he refused to go.
At one point during the struggle, Lee said, Villarreal stood up and took "an aggressive stance," which led to the Taser attempt.


Read more: http://www.kansas.com/2011/04/28/1827093/derby-teen-says-officers-injured.html#ixzz1LLlD5CDH

Gotta love the "aggressive stance" BS. You don't even have to raise your fists to give th cop reason to taze you; your footing can be used as an excuse for using a potentially deadly weapon.

CR

Don Corleone
05-04-2011, 19:46
Just curious if you're ever worried about one of these police groups coming after you personally CR, for publishing their dark deeds?

ELITEofWARMANGINGERYBREADMEN88
05-04-2011, 21:07
Hmmmm, so maybe if people won't act like such morons, maybe the police won't have to be rough with them? :idea2::idea2:


And besides, would you rather not have police around? Would you prefer to get murdered or raped or have a loved one murdered/raped,mugged,etc.... freefly and go unpunished (the criminal) because some of you are to weak to see police doing their jobs?

:inquisitive::idea2:

ajaxfetish
05-05-2011, 01:05
And besides, would you rather not have police around?

The only options are tyrannical police and no police?

Ajax

drone
05-05-2011, 03:27
The only options are tyrannical police and no police?

Ajax
I think what he is saying is that he supports authority figures abusing their power for the good of the overall community.

Crazed Rabbit
05-05-2011, 07:18
Just curious if you're ever worried about one of these police groups coming after you personally CR, for publishing their dark deeds?

Heh, no. I doubt very much any police group/department knows of this site. There are many bigger sites that list police abuses and have a national audience.

Though one of those bloggers did have the cops come to visit - fortunately only after he moved out of state.

I'm only concerned about the cops getting the wrong address on a raid on a suspected pot smoker and busting my door down. Not much that I can do about that, though.

If I had a blog and listed specific incidents about local police, that'd be different. And call for openVPN and other privacy tools.


Hmmmm, so maybe if people won't act like such morons, maybe the police won't have to be rough with them?

Listen very carefully, because I want you to understand this;

It is not a crime to 'be a moron'. When the police illegally assault someone for a legal action, that means the police are acting without being constrained by laws. And that means they can attack anyone, anywhere, for doing anything.

Would you prefer your loved one gets beaten or murdered by the police - only to be charged with multiple crimes if they survive?


And besides, would you rather not have police around? Would you prefer to get murdered or raped or have a loved one murdered/raped,mugged,etc.... freefly and go unpunished (the criminal) because some of you are to weak to see police doing their jobs?

It's a waste, but listen very, very carefully; you present a completely false choice. That means society does not have to choose between violent police and no police. There is a very reasonable middle ground; police that don't break the law.

No one here is "to weak to see police doing their jobs?". The problem, and again, try to listen very carefully - is that police are not doing their jobs. They are acting like violent thugs with badges.

If the only way you can rationalize the police brutality is to use pathetic logical fallacies, then you're entire argument is hopeless, null and void.

CR

Louis VI the Fat
05-05-2011, 17:36
The difference between a military junta, between creepy men with moustaches and leather boots and sunglasses deciding your rights, and a first world democracy, are a few men like Rabbit who take up the civic responsibility to protect the liberty of their society.

Crazed Rabbit
05-12-2011, 04:30
A marine serves two tours of duty in Iraq, only to be gunned down by cops invading his home (http://azstarnet.com/news/local/crime/article_d7d979d4-f4fb-5603-af76-0bef206f8301.html) with his wife and children.

The cops refuse to say what the warrant was for, and are insisting they did not do a no-knock warrant and that the marine was pointing a gun at them when they entered (but somehow this soldier didn't fire any bullets before police shot 71 times in 7 seconds).

They are more than likely lying on both counts.

They found nothing illegal in the house. At least, they haven't said what they found, but if they had found anything, they'd be trumpeting it, as though a bit of weed were excuse to kill an American soldier.

An American hero killed by thugs with badges.

CR

Fragony
05-12-2011, 09:47
Muhahahaha Amsterdam Amsterdam what did they do to you, used to be such a fun city. Singing a song on the Dam is that allowed? Police says NEIN and arrests her lololol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoRuMvBTYT8

Major Robert Dump
05-12-2011, 11:25
Hmmmm, so maybe if people won't act like such morons, maybe the police won't have to be rough with them? :idea2::idea2:


And besides, would you rather not have police around? Would you prefer to get murdered or raped or have a loved one murdered/raped,mugged,etc.... freefly and go unpunished (the criminal) because some of you are to weak to see police doing their jobs?

:inquisitive::idea2:

As someone who has had loved ones murdered and raped, this argument is irrelevant. Police can do their jobs just fine without resorting to unrealistic treatment standards in regards to police. The police work that catches murderers and rapists is not the same police "work" that kicks the living SNOT out of someone who rubbed the cop the wrong way.

Crazed Rabbit
05-12-2011, 20:18
Deputies in San Bernadino county, CA, taser a man until he dies for running a stop sign: (http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0512-taser-20110512,0,6214151.story)


Family members of Allen Kephart say the Crest Park man never did drugs, had no mental illnesses and the worst things on his record are traffic tickets.
But after a sheriff's deputy tried to pull him over in the Blue Jay area on Tuesday afternoon, his first real run-in with law enforcement became his last.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department says Kephart, 43, became combative and uncooperative with a sheriff's deputy outside a Valero gas station in Rimforest when he stopped his car after about a mile.

Deputies used Taser guns to try to subdue him. After Kephart was taken into custody, he lost consciousness and died at a hospital, authorities said.

Sheriff's officials did not provide details on what he allegedly did to be considered combative because, they said, interviews were still being conducted.

"All of that information needs to be documented before we start speaking publicly about specific detail like that," sheriff's spokeswoman Cindy Bachman said Wednesday.

But relatives say the way deputies treated Kephart was unjustified.

"They're not dealing with a criminal, a druggie, a gang banger. They were dealing with someone that was in the community for 43 years, that never ever had been arrested or had any problem with law enforcement," said his father, Alfred Kephart, 68.

Allen Kephart, a 1985 graduate of Rim of the World High School, worked as a substitute teacher's aide in the High Desert and as an audio and visual producer for his church and for television and radio. He also ran his own DJ business in the San Bernardino Mountains, calling himself the "Original Blue Jay DJ."

His father, a 20-year member of the San Bernardino County sheriff's Rangers volunteer unit, said deputies didn't treat Kephart like someone who just ran a stop sign - reportedly the initial reason a deputy tried to stop him.

"You don't go do a traffic stop and come out with your gun drawn. That's a felony stop," he said.

Sheriff's officials say that when someone evades a deputy, a routine traffic stop becomes high risk.

"The bottom line is the deputy does not know what they're dealing with," Bachman said. "There could be a variety of reasons the driver didn't stop. They can range from being unlicensed or an armed and dangerous wanted person."


And of course, since it is not statistically impossible that the man who ran a stop sign is a murderer, the cops have to treat him as such - and nothing else - because their "right to go home safe" - ie. escalate to deadly force at the drop of a hat trumps the constitution, human decency, common sense, and the lives of innocent people.

In Dallas the police try to keep lost money (http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/Dallas-decides-to-keep-cash-found-by-honest-teen-121609364.html) - $2k - handed in by a teen who was living in a one bedroom apartment with her parents and siblings - in violation of state law requiring the money be returned if unclaimed after 3 months.

Fortunately the bad press led to them backtracking on that, at least for now. (http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/dallas-police-have-change-of-heart-on-cash-found-by-teen-121666329.html)

CR

Crazed Rabbit
05-22-2011, 07:09
The bodies just keep piling up, and the police just keep lying. (http://abcnews.go.com/US/tucson-swat-team-defends-shooting-iraq-marine-veteran/story?id=13640112)

In Tucson on May 5th a SWAT team killed an American marine, shooting him in the early morning - 60 times in a few seconds. The police were all outside the house, shooting in. The Marine had grabbed his rifle because his wife saw the swat team and thought it was a home invasion.

The police claimed he shot at them - but they lied. The safety of his rifle was on. The police kept the paramedics away for an hour.

Even now the police haven't found anything illegal. Not even an ounce of weed.

But wait, they found a picture of "Jesus Malverde", so the police are trying to paint the Marine as being involved in the drug trade.


A Tucson, Ariz., SWAT team defends shooting an Iraq War veteran 60 times during a drug raid, although it declines to say whether it found any drugs in the house and has had to retract its claim that the veteran shot first.

And the Pima County sheriff scolded the media for "questioning the legality" of the shooting.

Jose Guerena, 26, died the morning of May 5. He was asleep in his Tucson home after working a night shift at the Asarco copper mine when his wife, Vanessa, saw the armed SWAT team outside her youngest son's bedroom window.

"She saw a man pointing at her with a gun," said Reyna Ortiz, 29, a relative who is caring for Vanessa and her children. Ortiz said Vanessa Guerena yelled, "Don't shoot! I have a baby!"

Vanessa Guerena thought the gunman might be part of a home invasion -- especially because two members of her sister-in-law's family, Cynthia and Manny Orozco, were killed last year in their Tucson home, her lawyer, Chris Scileppi, said. She shouted for her husband in the next room, and he woke up and told his wife to hide in the closet with the child, Joel, 4.


7-Year-Old Killed in Detroit Police Raid Watch Video

Lawyer Details Deadly Police Raid Watch Video

Did a Cop's Punches Go Too Far? Watch Video
Guerena grabbed his assault rifle and was pointing it at the SWAT team, which was trying to serve a narcotics search warrant as part of a multi-house drug crackdown, when the team broke down the door. At first the Pima County Sheriff's Office said that Guerena fired first, but on Wednesday officials backtracked and said he had not. "The safety was on and he could not fire," according to the sheriff's statement.

Tucson SWAT Team Shot Iraq War Vet 60 Times

SWAT team members fired 71 times and hit Guerena 60 times, police said.

In a frantic 911 call, Vanessa Guerena begged for medical help for her husband. "He's on the floor!" she said, crying, to the 911 operator. "Can you please hurry up?"

Asked if law enforcement was inside or outside the house, she told the operator, according to a transcript of the call, that they were inside. "They were ... going to shoot me. And I put my kid in front of me."

A report by ABC News affiliate KGUN found that more than an hour had passed before the SWAT team let the paramedics work on Guerena. By then he was dead.

A spokesman for Sheriff Clarence Dupnik said he could not discuss whether any drugs had been found at the home or make any other comment. "We're waiting for the investigation to be complete," he said.

In a statement, the sheriff's office criticized the media, saying that while questions will inevitably be raised, "It is unacceptable and irresponsible to couch those questions with implications of secrecy and a coverup, not to mention questioning the legality of actions that could not have been taken without the approval of an impartial judge."

Mike Storie, a lawyer for the SWAT team, said at a press conference Thursday that weapons and body armor were found in the home as well as a photo of Jesus Malverde, who Storie called a "patron saint drug runner," according to KGUN.

Storie defended the long delay in allowing paramedics to enter the home, saying of the SWAT team, "They still don't know how many shooters are inside, how many guns are inside and they still have to assume that they will be ambushed if they walk in this house."

But Scileppi, Vanessa Guerena's lawyer, said officers were "circling their wagons."

"They found nothing in the house that was illegal," he said. Framing the delay in providing medical attention as a tactical decision is "nonsense," Scileppi said. "There was an ambulance there in two minutes and they were never allowed in."

He pointed out that when Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was shot in Tucson, law enforcement let paramedics have access to victims in a far more volatile situation.

"The pieces don't fit. I think it was poor planning, overreaction and now they're trying to CYA," Scileppi said.

Guerena served two tours of duty in Iraq until he left the Marines in 2006.

Did a Cop's Punches Go Too Far? Watch Video
"Every time he was under my command, he definitely pulled his weight," said Leo Verdugo, his master sergeant in Iraq, who helped arrange for Guerena to be buried in his Marine dress blue uniform. "I have a hard time grasping how something so tragic could happen."

He speculated that perhaps it was a case of mistaken identity. "At the wrong place at the wrong time in his own home," he said.

Vanessa Guerena is "devastated and distraught" and seeking justice for her husband and two sons, said her lawyer. "The main thing she wants is her husband's name cleared and his honor restored."

The oldest boy, Jose, turns 6 on Tuesday. "He went to school, came back and never saw his daddy again," said Ortiz. As for Joel, "He's asking, 'Why did the police kill my daddy?'

"We were so worried when he was over there fighting terrorism, but he gets shot in his own home," Ortiz said. "The government killed one of their own."


Valiant men go over to fight for our country on the other side of the world, and the reward a few of them get is to be killed by cowards given automatic weapons and a license to kill.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
05-22-2011, 07:40
In Detroit, a year ago, the 'highly trained' SWAT team killed a seven year old, shooting her as she slept. (http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/year-killed-detroit-police-raid-10722407)

The police version is that the first SWAT member through collided with the girl's grandmother, and that this 'highly trained' cop then accidentally shot their gun.

The footage says different - of course. The cops threw a flashbang grenade through the window, totally oblivious to where it may land.

The "investigation" is still ongoing (http://www.freep.com/article/20110517/NEWS01/105170378/Death-investigation-into-death-Detroit-7-year-old-criticized?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s), as they want to wait a good long time for the righteous anger to die down before declaring everything went according to procedure and that no one will be punished.

In Philadelphia cops confront, swear, and point their guns (http://articles.philly.com/2011-05-16/news/29548742_1_firearms-license-youtube-clips-gun-rights) at a man who was legally carrying a gun, because the cops were power-tripping and ignorant of the law (no punishment for them, of course). After those keystone kops called their bosses looking for an excuse to lock him up, they were finally told he wasn't doing anything wrong, so they released him.

But he recorded the audio of the incident, and put it on youtube. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-vUYeJXSrA&feature=player_embedded) (LANGUAGE WARNING)

And that made the police angry, so the DA charged him with two crimes - reckless endangerment and disorderly conduct.


http://www.theagitator.com/2011/05/19/philadelphia-district-attorney-r-seth-williams-should-be-arrested/
The Fiorino case is a perfect example of that double standard. But the Fiorino case is even more pernicious. Because he’d had previous episodes with cops who were ignorant of local gun laws, Fiorino was carrying an audio recorder with him in Philadelphia. He recorded his confrontation with the Philly cops, and that audio exposed them for the ignorant, thuggish threats to the public that they are. (Note: I regularly caution against holding individual cops responsible for enforcing bad policy. I don’t use words like “ignorant” and “thuggish” lightly. These cops were both.) The recording Fiorino made of his encounter was also perfectly legal.

So what are we to then make of Philadelphia District Attorney R. Seth Williams’ decision to arrest and charge Fiorino after Fiorino posted the recordings on the Internet?

Here’s what I make of it: It’s criminal. Fiorino embarrassed Philadelphia cops, and Williams is punishing him for it. Williams and the police spokesman are claiming Fiorino deliberately provoked the cops. No, he didn’t. He didn’t wave the gun at anyone. He didn’t invite police scrutiny. The cops confronted him upon seeing a weapon he was legally carrying in a perfectly legal manner. And they were wrong. Make no mistake. This is blatant intimidation.

But while their behavior in this story was repugnant, at least the cops had the plausible explanation of ignorance for the initial confrontation, then fear for their safety when an armed man they incorrectly thought was violating the law pushed back (though neither is an excuse, and neither should exclude them from discipline). What Williams has done since is much worse. It is premeditated. Much more than the cops, Williams should know the law. Moreover, even if he didn’t know the law at the time, he has since had plenty of time to research it. By now, Williams does know the law. (If he doesn’t, he is incompetent.) And he knows that even if Fiorino did deliberately provoke the cops to test their knowledge of Philadelphia’s gun laws, that also is not a crime.

Yet he’s charging Fiorino anyway, with “reckless endangerment and disorderly conduct”—the vague sorts of charges cops and prosecutors often fall back on when they can’t show any actual crime. A spokesperson for Williams said Fiorino was “”belligerent and hostile” to police who were investigating a possible crime. Read the transcript of the audio in the linked article above and tell me who is “belligerent and hostile.” Read it knowing who was breaking the law, who was following it, and while remaining cognizant of which party was threatening to put a bullet in the head of the other.

Note that nothing Fiorino did was on its own illegal. Willliams is attempting a striking, blatantly dishonest bit of legal chicanery. His theory goes like this: If you undertake a series of actions that are perfectly legal and well within your rights, but that cause government agents to react in irrational ways that jeopardize public safety, you are guilty of endangering the public.

This can’t stand. It’s a blatant abuse of office. Williams is using the state’s awesome power to arrest and incarcerate to intimidate a man who exposed and embarrassed law enforcement officials who, because of their own ignorance, nearly killed him. Exposing that sort of government incompetence cannot be illegal. And it isn’t illegal.

The message Williams is sending is this: Yes, you might technically have the right to carry a gun in Philadelphia. But if you exercise that right, you should be prepared for the possibility that police officers will illegally stop you, detain you, threaten to kill you, and arrest you. And I’m not going to do a damn thing about it. And yes, you may technically also have First Amendment rights in Philadelphia, but if you dare exercise them to let the larger public know what happened to you for exercising your right to carry a gun, I will try to put you in prison.

The state is retaliating for a man legally carrying a gun, legally recording audio, and legally posting that audio online, because it embarrassed the police, and thus this man must suffer.

In California, some police brutality at the wrong address; (http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Menlo-Park-Cops-Raided-Wrong-House-Says-Claimants-in-Lawsuit-122191569.html)


When Menlo Park police officers busted into an East Palo Alto home and pointed a firearm at a two-year old girl in November, they had the wrong house, say the two homeowners, who are filing a $500,000 claim against both cities.

The cops did have a search warrant for a home on Garden Street on Nov. 2, 2010, but it wasn't for the home of Carlos Nava and Melissa Verduzco, whose door cops broke down at 6:45 a.m. that day, reported the Palo Alto Daily News.

The East Palo Alto City Council rejected the claim on an unanimous vote. The Menlo Park City Council has yet to consider the case.

According to the claims, "A sergeant Cowans slammed (Nava's) face to the ground and kneed him in the back of the head. Later, this officer punched (Nava) about the body," the newspaper reported.

Other officers entered Verduzco's room and "pointed laser-sighted firearms" at Verduzco and her 2-year-old daughter, the claims state.

It's unclear which house cops intended to hit and what they were searching for. Menlo Park cops did not comment on the story, according to the newspaper.

Because of the alleged botched raid, Nava suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, stutters occasionally and has back and neck problems, the claims state. All three have suffered nightmares and "general fear and violation of their civil rights," according to the claims.

East Palo Alto City Attorney Valeria Armento said that the case is a Menlo Park matter, not an East Palo Alto matter. All of the raiding was done by East Palo Alto cops.

Cops around the nation; awful brave at shooting friendly dogs. (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2009-07-19/dogs-in-a-deadly-crossfire/#)

In Durham Ohio, a SWAT team going into a house (http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/story?section=news/abc11_investigates&id=8140686)- the leader of which trips going up the stairs to the porch, as he's pointing a submachine gun - are entering a house they have no warrant for, having already arrested the suspect outside. There's a dog at the top of the stairs, just sitting there. The cop shoots her without a second thought, as you or I might swat at a fly. This with a machinegun in a residential neighborhood.

A story about cops acting so badly they actually get fired - only to be rehired thanks to strong police union regulations (http://networkedblogs.com/i6Kf7).

Look at these stories and think about what must be going on in the mind of a cop who acts like this.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
05-28-2011, 03:20
Two years ago, in Columbia, Missouri police served a search warrant on a guy with no prior felonies for selling marijuana.

Naturally, they came in the middle of the night, throwing five grenades, shooting every dog they saw, and dressed in military gear, with machineguns.

This is modern American law enforcement; breaking down doors in the middle of the night for pot. Didn't even the Nazi secret police knock on the door at night?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ng6mfpZ2kR4&feature=player_embedded

CR

PanzerJaeger
05-28-2011, 03:34
Valiant men go over to fight for our country on the other side of the world, and the reward a few of them get is to be killed by cowards given automatic weapons and a license to kill.

Pretend soldiers with bloated budgets and no accountability. Of all the tragic ridiculousness surrounding the Guerena case, I wonder how many Pima County residents are aware that their tax dollars paid for an armored personnel carrier. What the **** does local PD need with an APC? :no:

a completely inoffensive name
05-29-2011, 12:35
The war on drugs is what spurs these police abuses due to the power they have from prohibition laws. The war on drugs is to a large extent solely due to Americans wanting to regulate their morals on other Americans.

There was a chance for marijuana to be legalized in California last election, to have the madness end for California. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prop_19) It was well written, prohibited driving and everything else you can't do while drunk but now applied for pot. Regulations to make it only for adults just like tobacco.

But California decided to keep the police abuse 54% to 46%, an 8 point difference. Too many people are so uncomfortable with what others do with their body that they clamor to the government to stop it all.

Police abuses ultimately are the fault of the American public not the government. It is moral pushers who want these actions continued because they feel that as long as they stay away from the stuff, they don't care how reckless the government gets with them "druggies".

Fragony
05-30-2011, 11:50
One more for the CR diaries http://www.dumpert.nl/mediabase/1504301/7636196c/tanzen_verboten_.html

Geez.

InsaneApache
05-30-2011, 12:31
I'd fro him to the fwoor as well dancing like that. Bloody Romans!

Crazed Rabbit
05-30-2011, 17:56
One more for the CR diaries http://www.dumpert.nl/mediabase/1504301/7636196c/tanzen_verboten_.html

Geez.

I'd heard about that (it went to the Supreme Court, who decided in favor of the police arresting people for dancing) but not seen anything. Figures the cops need to shove their knee into the back of a guy's neck while he's on the ground while yelling 'stop resisting'. Trying to breath? That's resisting!

CR

Crazed Rabbit
06-03-2011, 07:30
In China, the secret police shove you around a couple times (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8FCtgrq73Q&feature=youtu.be) if you try to record them with a videocamera.

In the police state of Illinois, a man faces up to 75 years in prison (http://reason.com/archives/2010/12/07/the-war-on-cameras) for having a tape recorder in a courtroom during his traffic citation trial.

Yay.

CR

Louis VI the Fat
06-03-2011, 15:21
In China, the secret police shove you around a couple times (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8FCtgrq73Q&feature=youtu.be) if you try to record them with a videocamera.

In the police state of Illinois, a man faces up to 75 years in prison (http://reason.com/archives/2010/12/07/the-war-on-cameras) for having a tape recorder in a courtroom during his traffic citation trial.

Yay.

CR..the heck?


People worldwide protest in front of Burmese embassies over this sort of stuff.

Where's my membership card of Amnesty, I'm going to write to them.

Crazed Rabbit
06-04-2011, 07:30
And that's why I never considered getting a job in Illinois.

A Priest is falsely arrested by police as he tries to film them harassing poor minority immigrants. (http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/priests_video_contradicts_police_report/)



The video, taken by Father Manship (pictured), shows the seconds leading up to his arrest.

The footage appears to contradict a claim made by the East Haven police department in a police report that was withheld until 13 days after the incident. The police report, David Cari, one of two arresting officers, states that he didn’t know what the New Haven priest was holding. He wrote that he saw an “unknown shiny silver object” that Manship had “cupped” in his hands, and was afraid for his safety. Read the police report here.

The footage clearly shows that the arresting officers knew that Manship was holding a camera, not an “unknown shiny silver object.”

In the video, the Officer Cari twice refers to the object as a camera.

“Sir what are you doing? Is there a reason that you have a camera on me?” says Cari, in the video.

...

Asked to respond to the allegations that police harassment has increased, Keefe said, “I have a very simple question: when was the last time anyone filed a complaint with any town official in East Haven” regarding police harassment of Latinos?

“None. Ever. No. None,” said Keefe, answering his own question.

“It’s one thing to have Father Manship slander the people of East Haven… It’s another to produce evidence of that,” Keefe said.

Manship has said that he was in the process of compiling evidence of police harassment before he was arrested by the police.

Ain't that a great way to prevent people from filing complaints?

CR

InsaneApache
06-05-2011, 01:35
I bet you wish we'd stayed in charge now.

Crazed Rabbit
06-07-2011, 03:50
So several days ago a bunch of cops in Miami shot at a car (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/05/30/v-fullstory/2241990/police-gunmen-open-fire-on-south.html) they said tried to run down some cops:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbfTW3MfDn0&feature=player_embedded

They claim he was shooting at police, but it took them two days to find the gun in his car (planted, likely, or unfired). They ended up shooting a lot of bullets recklessly, and injuring four other people in the downtown area with their reckless shooting.

To cover it up, they went after nearby civilians (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/06/02/v-fullstory/2248396/witnesses-said-they-were-forced.html) who had recorded the event and grabbed cellphones and smashed them;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXpMzT5yGp8&feature=player_embedded

The only reason you can see the video above is because the cameraman hid the SIM chip from the phone in his mouth (http://www.pixiq.com/article/MIami%20Beach%20Police%20Ordered%20Videographer%20 At%20Gunpoint%20To%20Hand%20Over) before police took the phone, smashed it on the ground, pointed guns at him, then arrested him.

That's smuggling-video-out-of-North-Korea ballsy.

Cops have adapted to the brave new world of video of cellphone videos by increasing their level of violence against civilians and destroying evidence.

CR

ELITEofWARMANGINGERYBREADMEN88
06-07-2011, 14:47
How about we just let cops do there jobs? Sometimes I wonder if you people would want to get murdered,raped,mugged....


:idea2::idea2: :juggle2::juggle2:

Louis VI the Fat
06-07-2011, 18:23
To cover it up, they went after nearby civilians (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/06/02/v-fullstory/2248396/witnesses-said-they-were-forced.html) who had recorded the event and grabbed cellphones and smashed them;


The only reason you can see the video above is because the cameraman hid the SIM chip from the phone in his mouth (http://www.pixiq.com/article/MIami%20Beach%20Police%20Ordered%20Videographer%20 At%20Gunpoint%20To%20Hand%20Over) before police took the phone, smashed it on the ground, pointed guns at him, then arrested him.

That's smuggling-video-out-of-North-Korea ballsy.Brave man. It is marvellous to see that people are willing to risk so much for liberty, are willing to stand up to brutally repressive governments such as in Iran, China and the United States.


It is 2011. Governments need to understand you can't arrest us all, can't supress all evidence. Somebody will always film today's Neda's, somebody will get a videos out there, for the entire world to see.

Crazed Rabbit
06-09-2011, 08:18
How about we just let cops do there jobs? Sometimes I wonder if you people would want to get murdered,raped,mugged....


:idea2::idea2: :juggle2::juggle2:

Warman, you have no idea what's going on here, do you?

CR

Shibumi
06-09-2011, 18:13
How about we just let cops do there jobs? Sometimes I wonder if you people would want to get murdered,raped,mugged....


:idea2::idea2: :juggle2::juggle2:

I do not really get what you are aiming at here, explain please?

What you wrote could be read as - "it is important to let the police have whatever way they please or you might get raped" - which would come off as rather unlucky thinking.

Papewaio
06-10-2011, 02:35
How about we just let cops do there jobs? Sometimes I wonder if you people would want to get murdered,raped,mugged....


:idea2::idea2: :juggle2::juggle2:

Sarcasm? You believe that police can abuse the law however they wish rather then uphold it?

My sentencing regime would go like this:

Commit a crime do the time
Commit a crime (other then self defence) against an on duty officer in uniform then do the time plus extra.
Commit a crime as a government official including police officers, then do double time and have all your accounts audited, and pention revoked if it was a violent crime.

Cops should be supported, criminals in uniform should have the book thrown at them.

There are far worse things then terrorists, one of them is a police state.

Crazed Rabbit
06-15-2011, 06:05
A off-duty (and out of uniform) cop in Philadelphia saw a man peaceably (and legally) carrying his gun from his car into a house. The cop confronted the man when he came out, then chased him back inside and shot him dead (http://articles.philly.com/2011-04-27/news/29478789_1_police-officer-police-shooting-shooting-range);


The officer told investigators he was helping a relative move into a house on Worth Street about 4 p.m. Monday when he saw Taylor, carrying a handgun, walk in and out of a house across the street.

The officer said he identified himself as a police officer and demanded that Taylor drop his weapon but said Taylor tried to escape by going into his home. In the process, police said, Taylor pointed the gun at the officer. At that point, the officer fired and hit Taylor in the chest.

But Britton said Taylor's gun was legal, registered, and unloaded when he took it next door to a friend's house. Taylor, a member of the roofers union, was planning a trip to the shooting range later in the day for his friend's birthday, she said.

After a few minutes, Taylor returned to his own house, which he shares with Britton and their two young children. It was during those moments that he and the officer apparently got into a confrontation.

Britton said she heard no voices coming from the street. All she knew was that Taylor burst back into their home, as if someone was chasing him, and shut the door. She said the officer followed close behind.

The officer opened the door, walked into the home, and shot Taylor there, in view of the couple's 3-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter, she said.

"He came in my own house, looked at me, and shot him," Britton said. "I don't understand why this happened. Even if he felt threatened by Josh for some reason, why couldn't he warn him that he was going to shoot?"

Mary Thompson, who lives next door to the couple, was home when Taylor dropped by to show her boyfriend his gun. When Taylor left, she never heard any words exchanged between Taylor and the officer on the street outside.

"Then I heard a boom, and I saw [the officer] just run across the street to his house," she said.

After the shooting, when the officer ran back across the street to his relative's home, Britton ran after him.

"I chased him out the door because I didn't want him to get away with it," she said. "I ran in front of his house and shouted, 'You're not coming out. I'm calling the police.' "

Britton did not learn that the officer was a police officer until uniformed officers arrived.

"I didn't know he was a cop, and now that I know, I really don't care," she said. "What he did was wrong."

More murders and lies.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
07-22-2011, 05:35
Canton, Ohio, cop tells a man, legally carrying a gun - that he should have shot him ten times and executed him for his stupidity, and that his fellow officer would have been a good witness:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kassP7zI0qc

Also threatens to beat a woman if he sees her again that night.

The same police department that had one cop kill his girlfriend and mother of his child; the police didn't consider him a suspect - the FBI made the arrest. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disappearance_and_murder_of_Jessie_Davis)

An article on the video; http://www.cantonrep.com/topstories/x121489646/Canton-officer-under-investigation-after-concealed-carry-arrest

Note the comments. The mouth breathing morons defending the cops -
"All of you 'cowboys' that want to bash the cops ought to try going into the neighborhoods these guys police. Most of you couldn't fight your way out of a paper bag without your Glock. We expect these officers to bust their behinds to protect us yet we condemn them when they do their jobs.

As for me, I'm grateful to officers like Dan Harless and the rest of the officers of the Canton Police Department. If you're going to hang out with drug dealers and prostitutes, then you don't deserve a CCW permit, PERIOD!!!"
- are why it's so very hard to stop police brutality.

Also note the entitled attitude of cops towards other people carrying guns - the cops think they are better.

CR

Major Robert Dump
07-22-2011, 07:15
Heh, I have had that happen on more than one occassion, over-zealous cop won't give me the chance to claim, then tries to turn it around on me for being reckless when I finally get to tell him. Always on tape, and never had one act like that.

Major Robert Dump
07-22-2011, 07:45
You may have already posted these:

Man legally open carrying in Philidelphia held at gunpoint by ignorant Philly cops who don't know the law, won't listen to reason, and then when realizing they are wrong hold him in hopes of digging up something to arrest him on. This is the first part of 4 audio clips, the subsequent 4 are uneventful as its mostly just him sitting in a car. Notice when they find the recorder on him they accuse him of "Setting them up."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-vUYeJXSrA


Woman filming arrests happening in front of her house is arrested because some douchebag cop who doesn't know the law "feels threatened" by the 50 year old woman in a night gown with a video camera. They let the people they were arresting go, by the way, and ended up arresting her. Just once I would like to see a video where a dumb cops partner steps in and says "no...lets not do this."

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=340_1308755859


This one is more humorous than disturbing, but very indiciative of police mentality in places like OKC.

Cops cracking down on kids violating curfew catch teens at movie theater 20 minutes before curfew and arrest them. Except they were at the movies with their parents, and their parents had gone to the parking lot to wait in the car. Or their parents were en route to pick them up. Things that would have easily beens olved with a phone call or, ya know, a walk to the parking lot. Kids are loaded inot a paddy wagon and held overnight in a detention facility, meanwhile parents are scrambling to find their missing kids because the cops took their phones.

Whats even funnier is that the curfew law was the result of certain things happening in very specific types of neighborhoods involving very specific deomgraphics of youths, not white bread suburban teens in a nice suburban theater/resturant hub going to see the latest Natalie Portman movie. Oddly enough, while this was going on, there were teenagers shooting each other 5 miles away.

http://www.newsok.com/oklahoma-city-parents-complain-police-wrongly-rounded-up-teenagers-in-bricktown/article/3587106

ICantSpellDawg
07-24-2011, 17:29
Police are infuriating in too many instances. I wish more bleeding heart sissy liberals would become P.O.'s. We could use a few officers who didn't enforce stupid laws just to get authoritarian jollies. As a police officer, I would most likely be one of those sissy bleeding hearts.

It has been 7 months since I applied for my sportsman pistol license and it hasn't even been submitted to the board yet. That will take another 12 months. NY sure protects its citizens from people like me, even though that semi-auto mini 14 can be purchased within 5 days.

Crazed Rabbit
07-24-2011, 18:27
Kansas City SWAT team members charged (http://www.kctv5.com/story/15090956/indictments-handed-down-in-kck-police-officer-misconduct-case) with stealing money from a house they raided in an FBI sting.

The sting was set up after another victim of the SWAT team complained of them stealing thousands of dollars from her home.


KANSAS CITY, KS (KCTV) -
A federal grand jury indicted three members of the KCK SWAT team this week, sources tell KCTV5.

The indictments, which include conspiracy charges, won't be unsealed before next week, the sources say.

The three were part of an investigation into whether money and property were taken from a family during a raid. A sting operation was set up by the FBI after a resident complained about the officers' conduct.

Surveillance cameras were planted throughout the home and furniture was installed in the vacant house to convince officers that they were serving an actual warrant.

"I think we are sick. The reaction yesterday was sick to our stomach," said Police Chief Rick Armstrong

The three officers had been placed on unpaid leave after the January raid and they remain on unpaid leave after the indictments were handed down by the federal grand jury in Wichita.

Ten officers initially were detained in early January. Three have returned to work while four remain on paid leave.

CR

Major Robert Dump
07-25-2011, 07:00
On a related link to the story that started it all -- the initial incident where the woman complained about the SWAT team, the raid was conducted because -- are you ready for this --

COPS WERE SEARCHING FOR STOLEN ELECTRONICS LIKE A STOLEN XBOX, AND KICKED TE DOOR IN AND USED FLASH GRENADES. OVER AN XBOX

Ironside
07-25-2011, 11:39
Police are infuriating in too many instances. I wish more bleeding heart sissy liberals would become P.O.'s. We could use a few officers who didn't enforce stupid laws just to get authoritarian jollies. As a police officer, I would most likely be one of those sissy bleeding hearts.


Of course not, they need to always carry their guns and use then a lot more. It's how they make you safe.

Care to guess the amount of police abuse in Norway?

Crazed Rabbit
07-30-2011, 05:44
Police in California beat a homeless man to death with their flashlights. (http://www.pixiq.com/article/citizen-video-captures)

Removed picture of victim in line with forum policy. The picture is in the above report, so doesn't need to be shown again anyway. BG

http://articles.ocregister.com/2011-07-27/news/29826637_1_witnesses-tasered-officers


Ron Thomas, a former Orange County Sheriff's Department deputy, spoke to members of the media Wednesday afternoon at the site of the fight with his wife Cathy at his side.

After seeing his son's injuries and talking with witnesses, Thomas said his son "was brutally beaten to death."

"When I first walked into the hospital, I looked at what his mother described as my son ... I didn't recognize him," Thomas said. "This is cold-blooded, aggravated murder."

Witnesses told Thomas that his son was sitting on a bench when first approached by police, Thomas said.

Witnesses added that officers hit him on the back of a leg with a baton and Tasered him, he said.

Thomas tried to run away but only made it a few feet before being caught by two officers and "then that is when it all happened," said Ron Thomas, based on what he was told by witnesses.

Witnesses told Thomas his son wasn't moving but was still hit with the butt ends of flashlights and Tasered, he said.

CR

Crazed Rabbit
08-20-2011, 17:18
More reason to stay the :daisy: out of Chicago: (http://www.myfoxchicago.com/dpp/news/metro/michael-adrian-archer-chicago-police-brutality-beat-up-attacked-brothers-archer-caught-on-tape-20110817#)

Michael and Adrian Ayala were closing up the 7911 Food and Liquor Store on South Archer early Wednesday morning when they said a bunch of Chicago police officers, mistaking them for robbers, beat them up.

Officers were driving by around 1 a.m. as Michael Ayala, 23, was grabbing his keys from inside and his brother waited outside by his bicycle.

Police were apparently not interested in listening to Adrian Ayala’s explanation, and they handcuffed him. That’s when Michael Ayala went outside to find out what was going on.

“I seen them roughing up my brother,” Michael Ayala said. “I was telling them, ‘Could you please stop doing that to my brother.’ When I said that, a cop came around, opened the door and he hit me a couple times.”

The video does not show that, but it clearly shows what happens after the cops let the two men go without charges. An angry Michael Ayala yelled at one of the cops that he had them on video tape, and he wasn’t going to let it go.

“That’s when the sergeant just flipped out on me,” Michael Ayala said.

The officer, who Ayala says was a sergeant, bashed his head against the store window. The impact cracked the glass outside the doorway to the store.

The security camera video shows the officers manhandling the two men to the floor inside the store. Adrian Ayala, 18, was pinned to the ground on and beaten by a one group of cops, while Michael was being roughed up too.

"They bum-rushed me and threw me to the floor, they bashed my head in with their hands and they bashed my head in with their knees, as well as with their feet. I felt someone kicking my ribs," Adrian Ayala said.


Video of the brutal attack - retaliation for daring to say they had evidence of the first attack, is at the link.

It shows a half dozen police officers attacking men they knew to be innocent. A half dozen cops all joined in on beating innocent citizens, and not one tried, or even cared most likely, to stop them.

***

In Cedar Rapids, what does the SWAT team do after they raid a house for drugs and find nothing? Well the innocence of the peasants is an insult to them, so they charge their victims with a "Disorderly House".

No one was taken to jail, but the tenants of the house, Justin Davis, 28, and his girlfriend, Erica Lewis, 26, were charged with disorderly house and signed a promise to appear in court, police said. No one was injured during the raid. (http://easterniowanewsnow.com/2010/08/12/swat-team-busts-through-door-looks-for-drugs-at-cedar-rapids-house/)

Police said that there were no drugs inside the house but there was evidence of drug use. 23-year-old Jose Perry was cited for a disorderly house. Perry signed a promise to appear in court and was not taken to jail. (http://www.kcrg.com/news/local/Man-Cited-After-SWAT-Team-Raids-Cedar-Rapids-Home-128088668.html)

***

Another Cop Rapist in NYC: (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_OFF_DUTY_OFFICER_RAPE?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2011-08-20-02-32-07)

NEW YORK (AP) -- A drunken off-duty police officer grabbed a teacher off a residential street, showed her a gun and forced her to a deserted backyard where he raped her, authorities said.

Wonder if he'll get off like the last NYC cops accused of rape.

***

Virginia Police pull over a funeral procession to harass people: (http://www.wusa9.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=163455)

FAIRFAX COUNTY, Va. (WUSA) -- Fifty-three-year-old Timmy Hall was being laid to rest Thursday when the hundreds of mourners in his funeral procession were pulled over by Fairfax County police. Timmy Hall lost his life in a motorcycle crash a week ago.

I've been a reporter for 25 years and I have never seen a story like this. Not only did police pull over the entire funeral procession, according to numerous witnesses, they threatened to use a taser on the dead man's brother.

What began as a funeral procession along the Fairfax County Parkway to honor 53-year-old Timmy Hall spiraled into a confrontation between Fairfax County Police and the bikers who were mourning his death.

"They showed him no respect. I don't think any family during this time should have to go through what we went through yesterday," said sister Teena Hunter.

With lights and sirens, the family says police pulled over the hearse and the rest of the procession, threatening to arrest some mourners.

Sister Bonnie Boyer told 9NEWS NOW, "They worked very hard to give Timmy a send-off showing their love. And to have this happen is an insult."

Timmy's brother, Rusty, admits he was exasperated and was blunt with police.

"I looked at one officer. I said, 'Thank you for pissing on my brother's funeral.' And then another officer pulled up. I said to him, 'Thank you for pissing on my brother's funeral.' He goes, 'Have you got a problem?' I said, 'I'm upset, this is wrong,'" said Rusty Hall.

Rusty Hall says he turned to walk away.

"My two nephews came up from behind and said 'stop, stop, don't do it!' And I looked back over my shoulder and the officer pulled a taser," said Hall. "Was getting ready to tase me, as I was walking away."

Electric torture sounds like a standard response to someone talking back to you.


Want to sexually assault and molest underage girls and not get charged? Be a cop! (http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/17/20110817glendale-officer-sexual-abuse-accusations.html)


A Glendale police officer who worked off-duty at Mountain Ridge High School resigned this spring after he was accused of sending sexually explicit text messages to teenage girls and sexually abusing one of them.

The Maricopa County Attorney's Office has yet to decide whether Christopher Balmaceda, 25, will face criminal charges. Glendale police have recommended the former patrol officer be charged with one count of sexual abuse and four counts of luring a minor for sexual exploitation.


The same County with America's toughest sheriff, so tough he keeps pregnant women chained to hospital beds while they give birth (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/11/25/sheriff-joe-arpaio-report_n_370543.html).


CR

Louis VI the Fat
08-22-2011, 00:56
Thank you Rabbit, I am much obliged to you. :bow:




Want to sexually assault and molest underage girls and not get charged? Be a cop! (http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/17/20110817glendale-officer-sexual-abuse-accusations.html)I couldn't agree more. There are an alarming number of nasty men who would abuse any power invested in them to prey on the vulnerable.





The common theme in all the sexual abuse of women cases in both the 2002 and 2003
UNO reports is police officers using their law enforcement authority to take advantage of
vulnerable people. These include persons stopped for traffic violations, prostitutes, and teenage
girls.

[...]

In some other cases, the other officers retaliated against a victim who complained about
sexual abuse.

** Two Corcoran, California officers retaliated by interrogating the victim,
searching her school locker, and detaining her without her parents’ knowledge.
http://www.unomaha.edu/criminaljustice/PDF/dwf2003final.pdf

Shibumi
08-22-2011, 21:43
I will have an eye on this thread. I know of a lot of swedish police "missteps", might aswell put them up here henceforth.

Good digging Crazed Rabbit, but do bear in mind that you are not exactly on a secure link. It is fine(ish) now, but this is the sort of posts that might come back and bite you in a few years.

Crazed Rabbit
09-07-2011, 04:39
Criminal mobsters in Philadelphia beat innocent people on the street, seize and destroy video evidence, or intimidate people into deleting it.

Oh wait, those aren't mafiosos, they're cops (http://m.philly.com/phillycom/db_269443/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=8yaOzDfn&full=true#display), backed to the hilt by a DA who'll bring charges against people who post videos on youtube (http://www.theagitator.com/2011/05/19/philadelphia-district-attorney-r-seth-williams-should-be-arrested/).


TAMERA MEDLEY begged the police officer to stop slamming her head - over and over - into the hood of a police cruiser.

Thinking they were helping, passers-by Shakir Riley and Melissa Hurling both turned their cellphone video cameras toward the melee that had erupted on Jefferson Street in Wynnefield, they said.

But then the cops turned on them.

Riley had started to walk away when at least five baton-wielding cops followed him, he said, and they beat him, poured a soda on his face and stomped on his phone, destroying the video he had just taken.

Meanwhile, two officers approached Hurling, urged her to leave and, after exchanging a few words, slammed her against a police cruiser, Hurling said. They pulled her by her hair before tossing her into the back of a cop car, she said.

Although it's legal to record Philadelphia police performing official duties in public, all three were charged with disorderly conduct and related offenses, and officers destroyed Hurling and Riley's cellphones, erasing any record of Medley's violent arrest, the pair said.

Charges against Hurling and Riley were dismissed, but Medley was found guilty last month of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, harassment and related offenses. She was fined $500 but has filed an appeal.

Echoes of the incident, which was corroborated by a half-dozen witnesses, have been reverberating nationwide in recent years as the combination of cellphone video and police officers has simmered into what is an increasingly explosive formula. A growing number of bystanders have been misled, arrested or worse for using their cellphones to record what they perceive as excessive force by cops making arrests, watchdogs say.

"I grew up in the neighborhood and I saw stuff go down but it never happened to me," Riley said recently, adding that he did nothing wrong. "They stomped my phone and said it was a federal offense."
...
Despite the department's training, Philly cops have clashed with several people trying to record them and are sometimes unaware of what the rules are.

In the Wynnefield incident, residents told the Daily News that cops went after people who were recording and confiscated or broke their cellphones. A neighbor found Hurling's phone bent, with its memory card missing.

"They're supposed to be public servants, not abusers of the people they serve," said Berusche Jackson, who witnessed the melee and said he saw a cop stomp Riley's phone. "It was surreal."

In another case last month, police allegedly began beating Darrell Holloway, who is legally blind, with flashlights and batons during a narcotics investigation on a West Philly street. There wasn't much his cousin Jamal Holloway could do but record the incident on his phone.

Jamal, 33, said that when officers spotted him filming, he was detained and taken to a police station at 55th and Pine streets. Before he was brought inside, an officer told him to delete the video.

"One female cop told me to delete the stuff and then I can walk," Jamal recalled, adding that the cop said she would confiscate his phone. "I was there close up. I can't believe it happened like - they beating my cousin like that and he's in the situation he's in."

Jamal said he opted to erase the footage.

"As part of the investigation, we're not aware of anyone brought to the station besides those that were charged," said Lt. John Walker of Southwest Detectives.

Then in July, Zanberle Sheppard, 24, said neighbors told her that police were beating her handcuffed boyfriend, Tayvon Eure, in an alley behind their home on 65th Street near Chester.

Sheppard said she peered out her back window and began to film the arrest. After officers saw her, she said, they banged on her neighbor's door. Sheppard ran outside and around to the alley with her cellphone, she said, and that's when a cop told other officers to grab her phone.

She claims that when she pulled away from the cops, one officer grabbed her by her hair and she dropped her phone. Neighbor Robin Artis, 17, said she saw a cop punch Sheppard in the face and stomp her. Sheppard had a black eye and a bruised lip.

The next time she saw her phone was when the cop who allegedly beat her boyfriend came into the police station where Sheppard was and threw it at her, she said. The back of her phone was broken, the battery was missing and the video was gone.

Evers said Sheppard was told to "back away from the patrol car that contained her boyfriend, who was arrested for narcotics. The defendant pulled away from the officer and actively resisted." Evers said Sheppard was arrested after a brief struggle.

Sheppard, a mother of three who has no criminal record, was charged with disorderly conduct.

"I never get in trouble with the law," Sheppard said. "I didn't do nothing. I was just recording."

These aren't just a few bad apples. The whole force is rotten.

CR

Visorslash
09-07-2011, 04:57
These aren't just a few bad apples. The whole force is rotten.

Every police officer?

johnhughthom
09-07-2011, 05:04
I stopped reading at this: "Thinking they were helping, passers-by Shakir Riley and Melissa Hurling both turned their cellphone video cameras toward the melee that had erupted on Jefferson Street in Wynnefield, they said." Thinking they were helping, yeah right.

Crazed Rabbit
09-07-2011, 05:16
Every police officer?

Of the Philadelphia PD, how many are standing up against this?

JHT - could you elaborate?

CR

Visorslash
09-07-2011, 05:19
Of the Philadelphia PD, how many are standing up against this?

JHT - could you elaborate?

CR

Okay. I would imagine that's a false generalisation though.

johnhughthom
09-07-2011, 05:23
JHT - could you elaborate?

CR

I don't believe anybody would use a cellphone to record police doing their job "to help". If you want to help, you let them go about their job and don't bother them unless you actually have some information of use to them. So I'm automatically thinking of them as liars and don't really believe their story.

ajaxfetish
09-07-2011, 22:50
I don't believe anybody would use a cellphone to record police doing their job "to help". If you want to help, you let them go about their job and don't bother them unless you actually have some information of use to them. So I'm automatically thinking of them as liars and don't really believe their story.

I don't suppose doing something 'to help' necessarily means it was done to help the cops. Maybe they were trying to help the greater good by making a record of the truth and protecting the innocent?

Ajax

Papewaio
09-07-2011, 22:52
That's assuming that the people they want to help aren't just cops. Plenty of people are attracted to power who then go on to abuse it. Be it senators or bus drivers, anyone public official or company CEO can and does break the law.

Police are not the exception to the rule. They are public officials and there will be rotten apples amongst them. Good cops should be happy with bad cops getting kicked out. Bad cops make the work for good cops harder, more dangerous and demeaning as the good cops get tarred with the same public perception as the worst abusers.

There is a reason most good public institutions are setup with a separation of powers. This is so they can counteract abuses of power. Maybe a more intensive look at what can be done to balance ou police powers, root out he corruption and assist the good cops out there.

Major Robert Dump
09-08-2011, 12:54
I don't understand being butt hurt about cops being recorded. They record us. They record themselves.

The vast majority of police misonduct convictions stem from recorded evidence. Does this mean that misconduct never existed before recorders? A cops word will trump the word of 6 eye witnesses, and I am not saying that is a bad thing. Recording is a form of checks and balances. How many clear-cut cases of misconduct caught-on-tape situations do we need before people stop expecting cops to recieve immunity from the constitution? We have tougher ROEs in war zones that most cops do these days.

Crazed Rabbit
09-09-2011, 07:24
I don't believe anybody would use a cellphone to record police doing their job "to help". If you want to help, you let them go about their job and don't bother them unless you actually have some information of use to them. So I'm automatically thinking of them as liars and don't really believe their story.

So, their job is beating up on people and the peasants better shut up and get out of the way? And another part of their job is destroying unfavorable evidence?


I don't understand being butt hurt about cops being recorded. They record us. They record themselves.

They don't want to be accountable. They can delete (as they often do) their own videos when it shows them in a bad light. But the peasants daring to record video evidence that proves they were in the wrong? Why, then it's time for a beating!

Also, remember those Denver cops who got fired after getting caught beating on two innocent people (http://www.9news.com/news/article/217747/339/2-cops-fired-over-videotaped-beating-reinstated-) on a city security camera? (And, per usual, charging the beating victims with crimes and lying on police reports.)

The beating victims, Shawn Johnson and Michael DeHerrera, told 9NEWS they're confused, shocked and sick to their stomachs over the reversal.

"I don't think I need someone to say, 'Yes, Shawn, you were right, your civil rights were violated and these cops were out of line.' I don't need to hear that because I know what happened that night," Johnson said. "But I do expect people who are put in certain position to protect me, to protect me when I can't protect myself."

"It was finally clear what was right and what was wrong and everybody agreed that they were wrong," DeHerrera said. "So now to put that back up into the air is just ridiculous."

Immediately after they were arrested April 4, 2009, they were charged with misdemeanors and faced jail time for allegedly interfering with officers and not following orders. The young men had been kicked out of a bar after one of them used the women's restroom.

Johnson was considering cutting a plea deal when their attorneys learned city cameras had captured their arrests on camera. The video showed the officers tackling and hitting the men repeatedly with a metal weapon while they were not resisting. Police records later showed the officers lied on their reports.

The video also showed DeHerrera calling his father for help. Anthony DeHerrera, a Pueblo Sheriff's Department deputy, was upset at the panel's decision to put the officers back on the force.

"I'm shocked, appalled, disappointed. We can't believe it. There are knots in our stomachs," Anthony DeHerrera said. "I guess we had it wrong. Denver Police can do whatever they want to whomever they want and get away with it."
We can't have that! Quick, police union to the rescue! Let's get those thugs back in their jobs, with years of back pay, and to top it all off, say:

Because of the reversal, the police union called it a very happy day.

"They didn't deserve termination," Nick Rogers, president of the Police Protective Association, said. "At the end of the day, you actually have human beings who were out trying to protect the public and were doing it and were darn good cops at the time. They will come back and they will be good cops again."

Rogers says Garcia should be "ashamed of himself" for judging Murr and Sparks on nine seconds of video, along with the media. While the city is expected to appeal, Rogers said the union "will stand behind them until the bitter end."

Late Tuesday, acting Manager of Safety Ashley Kilroy said she supports Garcia's decision to terminate the officers.

"I cannot and do not tolerate excessive force in our city's safety agencies or departing from the truth by any of our employees," Kilroy said in a statement.

And Officer Crazypsychopants of Canton Ohio stars in a third video where he threatens to kill someone (http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/investigations/canton-police-officer-placed-on-leave-cleared-in-18-internal-complaints-3rd-dash-cam-video-released) he pulled over. This man was cleared of 15 complaints in the last decade, and the chief says he knew nothing about his psychotic officer;

NewsChannel5 Investigator Sarah Buduson asked Canton Police Chief Dean McKimm how Harless was able to get away with his bad behavior.
Buduson: “Why didn’t you know this was going on?”
McKimm: “I don’t understand your question.”
Buduson: “You’ve been in charge for a long time (9 years), how come you didn’t know about Harless’s behavior?”
McKimm: “Because there was no evidence Harless was a problem.”
NewsChannel5 obtained more than 700 pages of records on Harless from Canton police. The records showed there have been a total of 18 internal affairs complaints against Harless since 2000.
In 15 of the cases, Harless was exonerated.
“Each one of the complaints was investigated and they’re investigated thoroughly and completely,” said McKimm.
“It depends on the situation,” said Chief Dean McKimm, when Sarah Buduson asked him if the number of complaints against Harless is normal.
McKimm said hard-working officers are often the subject of false complaints.
“The number of complaints always raises a red flag,” said McKimm. “Until you can prove the officers have done something wrong, that they’ve violated some policy or procedure, we obviously can’t accuse them of doing something.”
“Officers do get lied about all the time. It does happen,” said McKimm.


Remember how the police union referred to those Denver thugs as good cops, doing 'darn good work'? Gee, it's almost like beating on people makes you a good cop, or brutality is so widespread that almost all cops do it.

Oh, that homeless guy beaten to death while crying for his father in Fullerton, CA? The police are refusing to release the surveillance video, or any of the videos they seized from witnesses. http://www.pixiq.com/article/fullerton-police-accused-of-confiscating-yet-another-camera

CR

Louis VI the Fat
09-15-2011, 01:01
[QUOTE=Crazed Rabbit;2053371326]So, their job is beating up on people and the peasants better shut up and get out of the way? And another part of their job is destroying unfavorable evidence?



They don't want to be accountable. [...] [removed by Ser Clegane] It's all too similar to the Catholic church. When the public calls out the rotten apples they charge on the messenger, instead of on the abuser within their own ranks.
This is a dead end. A losing proposition too. We are a democracy, we shall never shut up about government abuse. We exist to serve and protect democracy. We managed to beat the Catholic church into submission too. We did this by relentlessly calling out abuse, without giving in to - in itself well intended - advice to be hush-hush about abuse, lest we hurt the feelings of non-abusive Catholics.



[...] [removed by Ser Clegane

Papewaio
09-15-2011, 04:10
So LVItF why not join the police or prosecutors or judges or politicians and spend half that passion correcting the system from within?

Louis VI the Fat
09-15-2011, 04:26
So LVItF why not join the police or prosecutors or judges or politicians and spend half that passion correcting the system from within?I do. :beam:

Albeit not any of these four. There seems to be a mechanism that the more direct government authority one has, the greater the tendency to abuse it, and the more the esprit de corps is to close ranks and protect abusers.

Samurai Waki
09-25-2011, 21:43
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moD2JnGTToA&feature=player_embedded

Wall Street Protester in New York City, personally I think it's pitiful that they need this many cops for 1200 non-violent protest. Coward Pigs the lot of 'em.

Viking
09-25-2011, 22:25
One thing is to point out police brutality; something quite different is it to resort to daft name calling.

Samurai Waki
09-25-2011, 22:31
If they weren't, I wouldn't resort to daft name calling.

It's frustrating as hell seeing this sort of thing go down and not a single thing is said in the news-- it's pathetic, and these police officers are pathetic.

Crazed Rabbit
09-25-2011, 22:35
One thing is to point out police brutality; something quite different is it to resort to daft name calling.

So what do you call it when you pen in peaceful protesters and then mace them while they're just standing there?

CR

Montmorency
09-25-2011, 22:46
I only saw 2 protestors get maced.

Viking
09-25-2011, 23:06
So what do you call it when you pen in peaceful protesters and then mace them while they're just standing there?

CR


The individual cops that did this may well be 'coward pigs', but that's now how I read that post. It read more like an assessment of all the cops that had been called out.

Samurai Waki
09-26-2011, 00:00
The individual cops that did this may well be 'coward pigs', but that's now how I read that post. It read more like an assessment of all the cops that had been called out.

Anyone who uses excessive force against an unarmed, non-violent protester is a thug at best and traitor at worse.

NYPD pissing all over First Amendment Rights (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/24/80-arrested-as-financial-district-protest-moves-north/)

ICantSpellDawg
09-26-2011, 04:37
And Kelly said that the NYPD is able to take down a passenger plane if it was justified...

This action was despicable and whoever gave the mace order should be publicly disgraced.

drone
09-26-2011, 15:41
Tasers and mace are for "compliance". ~;)

Samurai Waki
10-02-2011, 09:50
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1tCYAEDl6g&feature=player_embedded NYPD- NOT YOUR POLICE DEPARTMENT

I also hear they like arresting children, it makes them feel tough.