PDA

View Full Version : Full unit/faction info and *screenshots* for American Total War



[GG]Lord Ashram
08-22-2005, 06:41
With the American Total War mod prepared for beta testing, we thought we would bring you this quick preview! Enjoy!

In the American Civil War era of American Total War, there are only two factions: the Union and the Confederacy. Each faction has its strengths. Union regiments are often well trained at discharging precise volleys and can hold firm under pressure. Confederate units are known for the unshakeable morale and the ferocity of their charge.

Regiments in the American Civil War era are generally designated in one of two ways. First, there are regiments from different states; generally well trained, these units can be counted on to perform on the battlefield, some being more distinguished than others at specific battlefield tasks. Second are the “named” regiments, regiments of fame and renown during the American Civil War. Generally these units are elite companies of men, hardened through combat and simply better soldiers than the vast majority of their countrymen. However, even these elite troops often have a role at which they excel above all others!

First are the units of the North. The Union, lead by President Abraham Lincoln, was undoubtedly the master of industry and had the benefit of an ocean of possible recruits. Over two million men served in the Union armies during the Civil War. Generally more well supplied than their Confederate counterparts, Union infantry often marched to war looking a bit more uniform under blue jackets and in light blue pants. Weapons were generally more standard issue (the “Springfield” musket and Enfield musket being the most popular) and plenty of uniform munitions allowed Union soldiers to train to a high degree. While the Union regiments were generally not known for the intense pride that many Southern regiments boasted, they were solid soldiers available in huge numbers and able to stand when called to arms.

Vermont Infantry: The state of Vermont contributed a great many soldiers to the Union cause. In fact, the Vermont Brigade suffered the highest casualties of any Federal brigade; in a week at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, the regiment lost 1,645 men out of a total of 2,800. Vermont units could be found in every theatre of the war and could be counted on to perform most roles admirably.

New Jersey Infantry: New Jersey troops were always well supplied and highly trained. Many units served the duration, including the 3rd New Jersey, which fought its first battle at First Bull Run and last served at the surrender at Appomattox. New Jersey units can be depended on to deliver hellish volleys and to stand fast even under the most furious of charges.

Maine Infantry: Involved across the all fronts of the war, the men of Maine won perhaps their most famous acclaim at the battle of Gettysburg, where they held the far left flank of the Union line. Maine men, lead by a large group of educated officers, could move and respond quickly and could be counted on to hold the line under even the most intense pressure.

New Hampshire Infantry: Seeing their first action early on at First Bull Run, New Hampshire regiments nonetheless retired in good order on that first hellish day. New Hampshire men fought in every major engagement from the inception of the Army of the Potomac until it mustered out in December 1865, often being at the front of a charge into Confederate lines.

Berdan’s Sharpshooters: The 1st and 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters took their nickname from their founder, Hiram Berdan, a champion marksman. Clad all in green and able to melt into their surroundings, each member had to place ten consecutive shots within five inches at a range of 200 yards. Eventually armed with the Sharps rifle, the men of the Sharpshooters were terrifyingly effective; it has been calculated that they killed more Confederates than any other regiment in the army. In one remarkable show of period marksmanship, in the course of the Peninsular campaign a small group of Sharpshooters silenced a Confederate battery for over an hour by shooting the gunners down at a range of over half a mile!

Ellsworths Zouaves: Otherwise known as the 11th New York Volunteers, or the New York Fire Zouaves (many men had come from the ranks of the New York City firefighters,) this Zouave unit’s Colonel was shot dead before the unit even saw combat by a Confederate sympathizer. However his influence did not stop there, as this formidable unit helped start the Zouave trend in the American armies.

Duryees Zouaves: Wearing the fez and bright red pants of French background, the 5th New York is one of the most recognizable regiments in the war. Duryees Zouaves (named after their founder) had a reputation for standing fast and for coolness under fire, going so far as to count off and reform its ranks while under hellish Confederate fire at Gaines’ Mill. The 5th New York would go on to build up a decorated record of service through the war.

Pennsylvania Bucktails: Also known as the 1st Pennsylvania Rifles, this regiment, comprised of experienced hunters and marksmen, moves fast and fights hard. Fighting at Anteitam, Fredricksburg, Gettysburg, and a host of other major conflicts through the war, these Pennsylvania men decorated their kepis with buck tails in a reputed effort to “dress up” the otherwise boring standard blue kepi.

The Iron Brigade: Originally comprised of a mix of Wisconsin and Indiana regiments, the Iron Brigade became one of the most famous units to serve in the war. Famous for their blue frock coats and black “Hardee” style hats, at Gettysburg this tough-as-nails regiment was one of the first units to arrive to the field and held fast, eventually losing 1,200 out of the 1,800 men engaged in that battle. It pleased many Union officers when the Iron Brigade came to the defence of their lines.

The Irish Brigade: Another of the most famous regiments to serve in the American Civil War. Comprised largely of Irish and Scottish immigrants from the 63rd, 69th, and 88th New York originally, the Irish Brigade was well known for being ferocious in close combat and unwavering in holding the line. The regiment won particular renown at Fredericksburg and Antietam, charging resolutely under the fluttering green-field-and-golden-harp flag.

Now the units of the South. The Confederate States of America fielded armies marked by excellent generals and excellent morale. While often short on materials and even on replacement troops, hard-charging Confederate troops were often led to victory over larger and better supplied Union enemies by charismatic, genius, and often slightly mad commanders! The CSA seemed to be destined for victory earlier in the war, until the mass production of Northern industry and the unending supply of replacement soldiers wore the brave Southern states down.

VMI (Virginia Military Institute) Cadets: This institute for young cadets sent their men into the field at the battle of Newmarket. While not possessing the same ferocious skills as hardened CSA infantry, the VMI Cadets were still able to deliver volleys of practiced (albeit untested) fire in support of their southern brethren.

Alabama Infantry: Alabama infantry formed the core of many fine regiments in the armies of the Confederate States of America. Often wearing coarse clothing of grey or even butternut coloring, Alabama boys could be counted on to fulfill any battlefield role they were asked to play.

Georgia Infantry: Georgian infantry wore perhaps the widest array of uniforms of the Southern states, including butternuts, greens, blues, and neat grays. Enraged by General Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Georgian infantry developed a reputation for charging home as if whipped into a frenzy. Georgians were also very proud and valiant, in fact continuing to fight even after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse; the 5th Georgia finally laid down its arms on April 26th, some 2 weeks after the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia.

North Carolina Infantry: The “Tarheel” state, with the ability to produce its own textiles and with plenty of ports for those ships who could slip by the Union blockades, contributed a large number of men to the cause of the Confederacy. Well supplied, these men could carry the fight to the enemy with the bayonet as well as defend tooth and nail.

Mississippi Infantry: Mississippi, deep in the heart of the South, had much riding on the outcome of the Civil War. Understandably, the men of Mississippi developed a reputation of holding the line until the end, including at Antietam, where they held the Confederate line near the Dunker Church even after all of their field officers were killed.

Texas Infantry: The men from Texas, a rough and tumble border state that was actually an independent republic, gained much fame on the Civil War battlefields. Proud and unyielding, Texans were often at the front of successful Confederate charges, being counted on to drive the blue bellies from the field.

Louisiana Tiger Zouaves: “Wheat’s Tigers” were a fancy-dressed Zouave unit made up of many Irish “toughs” from the streets of New Orleans and were only held together by the commanders sheer will at times. Like their commander, who after being shot through both lungs declared “I don’t feel like dying yet,” (and didn’t!) the Louisiana Zouaves were at their fiercest in close quarters.

The Maryland Guard Zouaves: Wearing a flashy Zouave uniform, the likes of which were generally more popular in the Federal armies, the Maryland Guard Zouaves served in battles including First Bull Run and Gettysburg. Capable musketmen and steady in combat, the Guard were a dependable unit on the field.

Hood’s Texas Brigade: Like all Texans, Hood’s Texas Brigade, made up of men from Texas units under the command of General John Bell Hood, could be counted on for fierce and determined charges. Hood’s Texans became the shock troops of the Army of Northern Virginia, famous for their fearless attacks and bloody work across many battlefields.

The Stonewall Brigade: Originally under the command of General Jackson, the Virginian units that made up the Stonewall Brigade became famous for their steadfast courage and remained an elite force in the Confederacy. They got their name when, despite a hail of Federal fire, General Jackson stood fast before his men, standing as one man noted “as a stone wall.” These men could always be counted on to stand firm despite assault by fire and steel.

Both sides make use of a wide array of artillery as well as brigades of cavalry. However, rather than the heroic charges of the Napoleonic Era, Civil War cavalry fought from foot, dismounting and using their repeating rifles and carbines (including the deadly Spencer carbine) to create a form of highly mobile and dangerous firebase. The Civil War cavalry commander has at his disposal a fast, versatile force that, if used properly, can make a very immediate impact on battle.

Of course, all of these men would be useless without proper command. To that end each faction can call upon some of their most famous Generals to command their troops. The South can follow the genius and slightly mad General Jackson, the dashing and charming cavalry General J.E.B Stuart, the dependable defender General Longstreet, or the father of the Confederate Army, General Robert E. Lee. The Union forces are under the command of the ever cautious General McClelland, the prototypical soldier General Hancock, the rumpled and fiery General Sherman, and of course the future President General Ulysses S. Grant.

For more info, please visit forum.thelordz.co.uk !

Some screenshots of the ACW Era:

The Opening Menu

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/ATWMenu.jpg

A Federal Attack

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/Attack.jpg

Berdan's Sharpshooters

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/BerdansSharpshooters.jpg

Confederate troops

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/ConfederateLine.jpg

Confederate Dismounted Cavalry

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/DismountedCav.jpg

Union troops

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/UnionLine.jpg

[GG]Lord Ashram
08-22-2005, 06:51
With the American Total War mod prepared for beta testing, we thought we would bring you this quick three part preview! Enjoy!

FACTION: The British

It is said that the sun never sets on the British Empire, as it spans the world from end to end. However, the crown jewel in its colonial empire is surely its first colonies in the New World. After an intense Seven Years War between Britain and France, the thirteen Colonies rebel. You must use the British army, the finest military machine in the Known World, to grind the colonial traitors beneath your boots.

INFANTRY:

Loyalist Militia: Colonists who remain loyal to the Crown often form these units. Just as determined to fight as the colonial minutemen on the other side of the line, and equipped well by England, these units can hold their own against similar units and support many attacks with its mass of muskets.

British Regulars: The backbone of the British Army are better trained in all the soldiering ways than the Continental regulars facing them, and are in fact considered the finest army across the globe. With good morale, skill with the bayonet, and a fierce ability to deliver fire, British Regulars can be counted on in firefights across the continents. However, while they are certainly skilled soldiers, their dedication to order under pressure can sometimes lead to slow, if militarily precise, maneuvers.

Hessian Line: These mercenaries from the German states are the finest soldiers money can buy. Well-trained at reloading and fierce, they can be counted on to hold the line when other troops might falter, with their sharp bayonets and sharper skills. However, like their British Regular counterparts, their dedication to military precision can lead to slower maneuvers.

Scottish Highlanders: The Highland regiments, made up of Scotsmen, are the things of battlefield legend. Advancing with a roar, Colors waving, kilts and bearskins and bayonets, the savage Scots can be counted on to crush enemy infantry beneath their charge.

British Light Infantry: Essential in the slow moving British army are the British Lights. Fine infantry in their own right, Light infantry troopers can aim more accurately at distance while still remaining in a loose enough formation to be able to take position quickly. While not providing the sturdy base of fire that a unit of British Regulars might bring to a fight, the long touch of their muskets and quick movement is essential to success against the range and speed of the Americans.

British Grenadiers: The best soldiers on Earth. They deliver a volley fast, with far greater accuracy than any other troops on the field. However, they are most deadly up close, being comprised of the most battle-tested troops in the Crowns army. The measured advance of the Grenadiers will test even the bravest American unit.

Native Warparty: Many Native American nations contributed to both the British and American causes in the war for North America. The warparties, while certainly not being the trained soldiers of a regular line regiment, are nonetheless fierce and deadly. They are able to set ambushes from any cover, be it deep in the woods or in deep grass in seemingly open fields. While they fight in very small groups and will quickly flee a battlefield if it appears the fight is getting too serious for their limited numbers, the charge of a Native Warparty can terrify superstitious soldiers. In addition, the immediate impact of such a capable close combat shock force can crumble both the lines and the morale of ambushed troops. Used carefully and with skill, Native Warparties, despite their small numbers, can cause an enemy to crumble.

CAVALRY:

British Generals: England has been waging war since it was first established, and it has always been the very best. In North America, Clinton, Howe and Cornwallis led their men in the field, always counting on their years of experience to see them through a new sort of war.

British Dragoons: British dragoons are the most finely trained cavalry in existence. Deadly in combat, fast, and trained, they can be counted on to crumple enemy lines and disperse enemy cavalry with equal ease. However, use these superior, and expensive, troops well as they are not expendable!

Mounted Scouts: Many Loyal colonists and Native Americans serve as scouts through the New World for the British army. While not a standard combat unit, the Mounted Scouts are the eyes and ears in the densely forested battlefields of North America. Using them will not only enable you to see all corners of the board, they also free up more time to bring your other units up in training and efficiency.

ARTILLERY:

British Artillery: Artillery is the queen of the battlefield. With the sound of thunder, cannonballs can cut through enemy infantry like a scythe through wheat. Of course, these ponderous beasts can be costly to maintain, and obviously need to be kept safe, but if used wisely they can dominate. The light 4lb artillery piece is a small yet quick piece, capable of being maneuvered into position quickly. The 8lb and 12lb guns are progressively bigger and less mobile, being more suited for being set up in the ideal spot initially and then raining shell and shot upon the enemy the entire battle. Do not underestimate artillery.

FACTION: The Americans

The Patriots of the thirteen colonies are fighting for independence. Against the most highly trained army in the world, the patriot Minutemen and Continentals fight a hit and run style, never being pinned in combat and destroyed. Instead, they fight and move, constantly testing the limits of the concept of war, ambushing and then melting away into the forests. These armies fought for what the forefathers of the American nation wrote in the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness!”

INFANTRY:

Minutemen: Patriot men of all ages vowed to be ready to fight for their Independence in a minute. Across the thirteen colonies these Minutemen marched forward under the new American flag, ready to face the British war machine. While not the trained soldier that forms the backbone of the British army, the Minutemen are still fast and familiar with the territory and can bring a large mass of locally raised muskets to bear, although under intense pressure they have been known to break and run.

Continental Regulars: Washington’s army is made up primarily of a mix of untrained minutemen and the Continental Regulars, American’s first professional soldiers. While not trained to the level of the feared British Regulars, the Continental Regulars are capable soldiers and are quick to move and readjust to British movement, using their knowledge of the land to stay one step ahead of the English.

American Light Infantry: The best trained of Washington’s Regulars go on to become light infantry. Often veterans of the French and Indian war, these men are both accurate shots as well as able to deploy quickly and effectively on the battlefield. While not as large a unit as a standard regiment of Regulars, the Light Infantry are a far more versatile and able fighting force.

American Riflemen: These dangerous men of the American wild are the finest marksmen on the battlefield. Having honed their skills in a rugged Frontier, hunting and finding trails through the North American forests, the Riflemen are murderous at range on the field. With their long rifles and unmatched skill, the Rifles can rain lead upon an enemy unit long before the unit is itself within range. While they fight in small, quick groups that are unsuited for aggressive charges, the American Riflemen are tough men who are able to match and outreach the range of any British unit.

Green Mountain Boys: The Green Mountain Boys consist of some of the toughest men that the new colonies can raise. They move fast through the difficult American wild. Quick with their muskets, the Green Mountain Boys are used to long range hunting and can engage enemy units before the unit is even ready to fire, then quickly readjusting before being fired upon. But perhaps they are most dangerous as they charge into combat, a combination of knives, bayonets, and tomahawks being wielded with an unmatched skill and a bravery that bore a Nation.

Native Warparty: Many Native American nations contributed to both the British and American causes in the war for North America. The warparties, while certainly not being the trained soldiers of a regular line regiment, are nonetheless fierce and deadly. They are able to set ambushes from any cover, be it deep in the woods or in deep grass in seemingly open fields. While they fight in very small groups and will quickly flee a battlefield if it appears the fight is getting too serious for their limited numbers, the charge of a Native Warparty can terrify superstitious soldiers. In addition, the immediate impact of such a capable close combat shock force can crumble both the lines and the morale of ambushed troops. Used carefully and with skill, Native Warparties, despite their small numbers, can cause an enemy to crumble.

CAVALRY:

Generals: The American army was led by some capable and charismatic men. With former British officer George Washington at the lead, commanders like Gates, Morgan, and Greene led the American army in their desperate fight against an overwhelming military power, and eventually led them to victory.

American Light Horse: Many Americans grew up in the saddle. These men are fast riders and can strike with lightning speed and fury. However, they are not expertly trained soldiers, and can quickly break if engaged by a determined and persistent enemy. But for chasing down enemy soldiers and routing wavering opponents they are unmatched.

American Dragoons: Trained American cavalry, the American dragoons are fast and deadly. While slightly slower than the relatively untrained Light Horse, the Dragoons are able to mix it up with almost any unit on the field. On the charge they are fierce, and when they come sweeping out of woods into the flanks and rears of infantry they can rout entire armies.

Mounted Scouts: Many Patriot colonists and some Native Americans serve as scouts through the New World for the Continental army. While not a standard combat unit, the Mounted Scouts are the eyes and ears in the densely forested battlefields of North America. Using them will not only enable you to see all corners of the board, they also free up more time and resources to increase your other units training and efficiency.


ARTILLERY:

American Artillery: Artillery is the queen of the battlefield. With the sound of thunder, cannonballs can cut through enemy infantry like a scythe through wheat. Of course, these ponderous beasts can be costly to maintain, and obviously need to be kept safe, but if used wisely they can dominate. The light 4lb artillery piece is a small yet quick piece, capable of being maneuvered into position quickly. The 8lb and 12lb guns are progressively bigger and less mobile, being more suited for being set up in the ideal spot initially and then raining shell and shot upon the enemy the entire battle. Do not underestimate artillery.

FACTION: The French

An enemy of England for many years, France recently lost the Seven Years War to their North American neighbor. However, with the colonies now in rebellion and Patriots like Benjamin Franklin asking for aid, France sees a chance to contribute to their rival’s downfall. With sturdy professional troops who have served on many battlefields, the French bring to bear more traditionally powerful armies then the Americans, albeit troops not as accustomed to the flow and terrain of the North American battle.

INFANTRY:

French Regulars: The basic soldier in the French army has a rich heritage. At the time of the American War for Independence, King Louis XVI’s troops have fought over almost every continent and against almost every foe. On the North American battlefield, the French Regulars bring some stability and well-trained determination to the American cause. However, like their English counterparts, the French troops sometimes react more slowly and move more hesitantly over the rough North American battlefield.

French Light Infantry: Some of the best French troops, the fast and versatile French Light Infantry are very fine skirmishers. Quick with their muskets and quick on their feet, the Light infantry can force the enemy into awkward positions and to fight on French terms. While not as solid a unit as Regulars, their speed on the field makes up for their size.

French Royal Marines: The Marines form a fine elite reserve for the French army. A fast moving unit of highly trained troops, the Marines have the size of a standard Regular company but fire quicker and are trained for boarding actions and other close combats. The Marines can quickly plug spots in the French lines with determined precision.

French Grenadiers: These French elite soldiers are among the finest on the field. Ferocious in close combat, highly skilled with the musket, and boasting the finest morale, the French Grenadiers are unmatched man for man and can be counted on to rout the enemy from the field.

CAVALRY:

Generals: The French commanders in North America are some of the finest military men in the World. With the Comete de Vergennes organizing the French war effort, men such as the Marquis de Lafayette and the Comte de Rochambeau lead their men to victory time and time again on the battlefields of North America.

French Dragoons: The French cavalry is a branch with a long and illustrious military history. French dragoons are fine soldiers on fine mounts, able to move like the wind and hit like thunder. When used to hit enemy flanks or rears at the right moment, the French Dragoons can be counted on to collapse weakened British lines.

French Light Horse: Small elite units of French cavalry often roam the field. Easier to transport to this far away battlefield, the French often bring these fast units along to support their armies.

Mounted Scouts: Many Patriot colonists and some Native Americans serve as scouts through the New World for the French army. While not a standard combat unit, the Mounted Scouts are the eyes and ears in the densely forested battlefields of North America. Using them will not only enable you to see all corners of the board, they also free up more time and resources to increase your other units training and efficiency.

ARTILLERY:

French Artillery: Artillery is the queen of the battlefield. With the sound of thunder, cannonballs can cut through enemy infantry like a scythe through wheat. Of course, these ponderous beasts can be costly to maintain, and obviously need to be kept safe, but if used wisely they can dominate. The light 4lb artillery piece is a small yet quick piece, capable of being maneuvered into position quickly. The 8lb and 12lb guns are progressively bigger and less mobile, being more suited for being set up in the ideal spot initially and then raining shell and shot upon the enemy the entire battle. Do not underestimate artillery.

Some AWI screenshots

The Opening Menu

http://hellenictotalwar.com/ATW/ATWMenu.jpg

American Continentals and allied Natives prepare for an ambush

http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/6051/contsandnatives7sb.jpg

An American army ready for war.

http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/1038/americans9kd.jpg

British columns on the march.

http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/5290/britcolumn8gf.jpg

Blue coated Hessian mercenaries join their British allies.

http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/500/brits7ti.jpg

French Regulars and Grenadiers, reinforced by French Royal Marines and artillery.

http://img374.imageshack.us/img374/386/french1rk.jpg

Del Arroyo
08-22-2005, 07:13
That looks SWEET!

But what about artillery for the American Civil War?

DA

[GG]Lord Ashram
08-22-2005, 14:41
Ask and you shall recieve!

http://img288.imageshack.us/img288/5715/acwarty4si.png

:)

Thanks,

LA

King of Atlantis
08-25-2005, 00:27
So no Spanish Faction for Revolution?

BTW, can we see the map?

[GG]Lord Ashram
08-25-2005, 01:14
Ah, poor news on both fronts!

First no, the Spanish were not included, primarily because the gameplay essence of the mod was decided early on to be the pitting of two radically different factions, strategy-wise, against each other. The French were then added so players could play MP with two relatively equivalent "line infantry" armies that were historical enemies and so that the majority of the historical north-eastern battles of the war could be played. The Spanish were seen as simply a touch redundant, gameplaywise, but I am sure could be considered to be added in if people really feel their omission is unacceptable.

As for the map, this mod is for MP and SP Custom games only. The Artificial Intelligence in the game does not play very well, and given the amount of work it would take to make a campaign coupled with the insane frustration of doing all that work only to see the AI march its troops around aimlessly, we decided to leave the SP Campaign option out... for now:)

Thanks, and hope this doesnt drag you down too much!:)

LA

King of Atlantis
08-25-2005, 01:18
Ah, well i will possibly mod the Spanish in, assuming all MTW units are done in photshop?,.


still sounds good, I cant wait to play as the south.

[GG]Ashram
09-02-2005, 17:28
Final work is wrapping up and we should have the game ready for "shipping" within the week.

Thanks,

LA

Radier
09-02-2005, 20:33
Ashram, if there where a campaignmap too this mod would be totaly awesome. *sigh* ~:cheers:

[GG]Lord Ashram
09-14-2005, 22:43
Is it possible to get this stickied?

And by the way, there is a lot more planned for the ATW mod (which is finished and being prepped for release) including an entirely new set of American buildings and even a hidden Easter Egg or two that might bring a smile (and hours of play!) to peoples faces...

Thanks,

Lord Ash

[GG]Lord Ashram
09-15-2005, 01:54
S! all,

Just a quick, last update; the ATW mod is finished and just undergoing "lets make sure this installs" testing, and should be available within two weeks, give or take a bit to account fo Real Life Intrusions.

As a final taste, here is a final screenshot. Please know that you haven't seen it all; there are a few nice little treats hidden away in the game:)

Enjoy, and I'll see you on the fields of Gettysburg and Monmouth!

http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/3777/finalatw4ju.th.gif (http://img36.imageshack.us/my.php?image=finalatw4ju.gif)

Iustinus
09-15-2005, 04:35
Hey Ash,
That screenshot looks awesome!!!
How did you do the houses? I sort of understand how you could mod buildings, but I've been using Ultimate paint and for some reason when I save lbm files with it they don't work/cause ctd's.
I apologize for having not sent any info for the small mod attached to this one, I've been very busy adjusting to school for the past four weeks, and getting settled in with new schedules/work loads.
Thanks!
Wawulamallessil (Fare thee well)
Justin

The Blind King of Bohemia
09-19-2005, 18:37
Lord Ashram,
Could you check your PM's please mate? I need your help with something.

Thanks.

P.S. The mod looks great BTW. ~:cheers:

[GG]Lord Ashram
10-01-2005, 14:37
Got it:)

Just as an FYI for everyone, the American Total War mod should be available within a couple of days. Keep an eye on forum.thelordz.co.uk for more info!