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Thread: Roma Surrectum's Belgae Preview!

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    Default Roma Surrectum's Belgae Preview!

    For Roma Surrectum 2.0
    The team proudly presents








    THE BELGAE







    We are the Belgae. Our proud name means "the Furious Ones." This is and will always be our notorious name in the ancient Celtic language. It is no doubt that we consist of a great race of men, many of us hailing from many parts of mighty Gaul and others from the dark forests of Germania. Now, living in relative stability and brotherhood, we call Gaul's northern reaches our home. When we are roused to battle by the chiefs, the carnyx, and the loud, bass filled cry of our warriors, the entire nation rises as one with a single voice and a single body full of strength and determination! Living with this proud, yet intimidating, name, we Furious Ones are biding our time patiently. Both the respected elders and venerable druids speak of great times to come for our people under a new leader. They speak of a time where we will once again unleash our fury upon those around us. But who will lead us as a united people to victory?

    We all know, from the smallest child to the oldest elder, that we are in a unique position strategically. Wherever we move as a united people, we march as conquerors. We love to often speak of our homes, not only in Gaul, but also newly won prizes in Britannia. We have recently stretched out our sword arm in the direction of the misty, verdant lands across the sea to Britannia. We since carved out small empires in these fertile and mysterious lands belonging to the Britons, where they still cover themselves with their paints which presented a fearsome visage to even our able warriors. Our struggles were successful in the end, however. Our armies have long since called for their wives and children to be brought over into this new land, and we have settled in southern Britannia and have achieved supremacy there. Despite our victories, the Britons are no fools. Unity is strength, and the Britons, along with our peoples, will need all the mighty warriors we can bring to bear to be successful in defending both lands so far flung from each other. Do the we concentrate in expanding our territories in Britannia in hopes of ruling all the islands across the sea, or should we expand on the continent, seeking riches, gold, and the lucrative trade routes leading to warmer climates? These choices must be considered with prudence by anyone that should call us to war. Rash actions may mean loosing either our lands in Britannia, our homeland on the continent, or both! There is always hope, however. The leaders know that we, the Furious Ones, are overwhelmingly strong in our infantry, and this is where our primary strength remains. By the axemen, the swordsmen, the spearmen, and the champions, the Belgae know this is our one advantage against potential enemies. But of these enemies, what have the spies reported?

    Should our tribes strike south, we would eventually encounter the mighty Arverni and their own warriors. Being much more wealthy than we, they can produce the metal armor made of chain, and give this to more of their warriors than we can ever hope for. Its is also no secret that the Arverni Gauls excel in their Gallic cavalry tradition. It consists of the most well trained and most numerous cavalry of all the Celtic peoples. Despite their apparent advantages, our infantry can, with strong leadership fitting to our strength, can impale their cavalry upon our spears, and our many warriors can overwhelm their own in combat. The prospect of fighting against our Gallic brothers in the Arverni tribe sadden many of our warriors. The druids preach that perhaps an alliance can be made with our Celtic brothers should a common foe arise? Should they become decide against alliance and become our enemies, then so be it. It will be a tough fight for us, but one that can be won!

    In Britannia, we hold the south of this large and mysterious island. What awaits us to the north if we set our sights upon those lands? Though the unconquered lands in the north of Britannia do not compare with the riches of the Arverni, they are known for their fierce painted warriors and massive chariots of war. If we gain access to their tribes, and conclude a peace with them, we can have a ready supply of willing Brythonic warriors eager to invade the continent! These additions to our warrior's great numbers can only give our fighting men heart and fill our treasure chests with untold riches that even our most wealthy tribesmen can only dream of! This extra supply of warriors may lead us to swifter victory if we strike here and secure the islands of the Britons first, sail them to reinforce our warriors on the continent, and then expand with a fury that few have ever witnessed.

    To our east lay the forests, hills, valleys, and peoples of Germania. We know less about the savages that lurk in those dark forests and deep, endless bogs. We hear many strange tales of their warriors taking the guise of predatory animals that roam within northern Europe's forest! We hear these are fierce men, without reason, full of savagery that rivals our own. What does this mean for us? We know their lands are not rich or we'd have taken them for ourselves long ago, and those stretches of forest offer much less benefit to our tribe should we march our warriors into it's lands. Nevertheless, these Germans, as with any nearby people, should be considered a potential threat. Should they look to our lands, tempted by our fertile fields and way of life, they will see why we are called the Furious Ones. This we swear by!

    No matter which way our warriors are led, the Belgae stand as one people, and as one people, we will prove ourselves unstoppable to our enemies!




    The Belgae starting positions




    The Belgae Warriors





    Belgic Noble Cavalry





    These warriors are the best cavalry in all Belgic lands. They are mainly composed of the nobility, the rich, and the most talented horsemen brought together to form a deadly, crushing cavalry force. Their high quality spears, shields, and flexible chainmail is the very finest that can be found in the Belgic tribes. They are best used to break weakened enemy formations, fight against other cavalry and pursue fleeing enemies. In an emergency, they can quickly ride to the trouble spot, and often remedy the situation in mere moments. They are brave men and superb horsemen, many that have been riding for years. Although they can hammer infantry and other cavalry, shock and initial impact of their charge are their most effective tactics, ones that can cause their victims to rout afterwards with the right timing.

    Before Caesar marched against all Gaul and into the lands held by the Belgae, the nobility had trained and ridden cavalry into war for generations, and this was a common mode of warfare during nobility during that time period. The bravery and skill achieved by these nobles was popular in their lands, and for them to attain, and more importantly hold onto, such titles and position, required a swift horse, a sharp spear, and a talent for horsemanship and war that could seldom be equaled by any outside men in Gaul.

    No other chieftain can be more rightfully associated with the Belgae and their nobility than Ambiorix. He and another leader, Cativolcus, led the Eburones tribe into revolt against Rome in 54 B.C., and earned the Gauls a very cunning victory. Indutiomarus of the Treveri tribe might have masterminded the the uprising, however. At Aduatuca, where the Romans had built their base camp, the Roman foragers were harassed and assaulted as they were out gathering camp wood. The Iberian cavalry and the legions held their own during this attack. Ambiorix was soon given a parley where he convinced the camp commanders that this was not his idea, but that of other tribes, and he, in fact, had no quarrel with the Romans. Ambiorix is said to have mentioned that an army of Germans was only two days away and that the Romans should break camp and withdraw under safe passage. Sabinus and Cotta debated for along time to determine if Ambiorix was to be trusted. Eventually, they believed Ambiorix's claim as the truth and broke camp. Ambiorix's lie was taken as a truth. At daybreak, the Roman column moved out, but they were not in typical organized fashion as they were encumbered with camp baggage. This, and Ambiorix promise of safe passage, was still fresh in their minds so little caution was exercised by the commanders. About two miles away from camp, the road they would use delved into a rather deep ravine or valley. Here, the Belgae laid their trap. They attacked in two main sections, one at the front of the column, and one at the back of it. The distance of the column made communication impossible and chaos started to take hold as their desperately tried to defend their baggage train. Despite this, the Romans managed form up into a square for defense. The Gauls planned to tire the Romans legions out, and this is how it happened. From time to time, certain cohorts would break their square formation, charge the enemy, and uniformly defeat them, or so they thought. Whenever the Romans charged, then Belgae would fall back. However, the Romans were much slower in returning to their square. Once they turned back, the Belgae would rush forward and attack their flanks and the flanks of the cohorts in the square that were left exposed by the returning cohorts. From early morning until nightfall, the legionaries held their ground like true Romans, but suffered heavily in dead officers and soldiers.

    At this point, Sabinus was still weakly relying on Ambiorix's word of safe passage. During a break in the overall fighting he sent out Cnaeus Pompeius to ask a conference, on behalf of the Romans, with Ambiorix himself. With a number of tribunes in tow, Sabinus went when this was granted. During the conference they were surrounded and slain. Ambiorix was quoted as shouting over Sabinus' dying body, "How can such creatures as you wish to rule us who are so great?" Now the Gauls again attacked again in earnest and, owing to the demoralization of the men, speedily forced their way into the Roman formations. Cotta was slain soon after. Few of the cohorts cut their way out of the melee and managed to get back to the camp. Here the survivors all committed suicide during the night. A handful of fugitives found their way to the camp of Labienus, nearly seventy miles distant.

    It is estimated that between 7,000 to 9,000 invading Romans would have been slaughtered in this ambush. After this, it would take Caesar himself to put the rebellion down. By ordering what turned out to be a genocide, he spared no man, woman, nor child of the Eburones tribe. He virtually wiped them out. Ambiorix was never heard from again, however. He and his warriors were able to elude Caesar. They were last known to have crossed the Rhine towards Germania and disappear from history.








    Belgic Champions






    The champion features a rather lesser known helmet found in France in Normandy's Louviers Forest. Dated from sometime in the 1st century B.C. Its forged in one piece in the shape of a hat with a conical point (original boss missing), a flat inclined rim with rounded beading around the periphery, reinforced with riveted sheet-iron protection over the forehead with oval cut-outs arched like eyebrows, attached strongly curved cheek flaps with an ornamental boss in the center and with a riveted ring for the chin straps. Displayed in the R÷misch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum in Mainz, Germany.


    The champions of all the Belgae tribesmen, they help take the lead in planting the Belgic battle standards all over all enemy lands. Unmistakable in battle, the enemy that does not have the best armor or training will surely buckle under their furious charge and the melee that would immediately follow. Gleaming silver helmets cause them to really stand out in a fight. They proudly wear their best and most impressive armor in battle. As with other Gallic shields, their shield is every bit as strong and reinforced with a standard metal boss for added life of the shield. The forges of their own armor and weapon smiths have created the popular Celtic sword, and the chainmail that the champions wear is on par with what nobility would dress into on the eve of war. This affords the champion a complete suit of mail that will help save his life as they are often in the thickest areas of the battle line. Having these men nearby can offer lesser troops the inspiration and example to fight with heart, and, perhaps one day, lead them down the road to become a champion as they come into their own within the tribe.

    Often accused of being glory seekers and nothing else, the Champions of the Belgae are composed of every fit warrior of the tribes that attained personal glory through combat and achieved outstanding success in war. They can be seen out front in a battle line, taunting, boasting of their actions and the noble doings of their ancestors to unnerve the opposition. Champions are not born, however, they are definitely made, and in the Belgic warrior society every professional fighter would wish for this status. Only the chieftain or commander might have more experience and reputation than they. Some of them are following the dictates of Gallic war gods, such as Camulos, and bring the heads of their enemies and captured slaves directly to those altars. Others are talented fighters who give much time to sparing, dueling, and swordplay. All have have seen action against other Belgic tribes at one time or another in raids and wars. As a champion, each and every warrior has attained a notorious reputation, and they are seldom in agreement over much, except that when battle is near, these men will put aside their differences and concentrate on the fight ahead.

    The Belgic champion features a rather lesser known helmet found in France in Normandy's Louviers Forest. Dated from sometime in the 1st century B.C., its forged in one piece in the shape of a hat with a conical point (original boss missing), a flat inclined rim with rounded beading around the periphery, reinforced with riveted sheet-iron protection over the forehead with oval cut-outs arched like eyebrows, attached strongly curved cheek flaps with an ornamental boss in the center, and a riveted ring for the chin straps.







    Eburones Warriors





    To be the first warrior to grasp his weapon, choose an opponent to kill, and force his weapon in the face of the enemy is a trait of the bravest combatants in the Belgic tribal circles. These Eburones warriors are some of the better fighting individuals in their tribe, and are armed with the swords, armor, and shields available that they won in battle or attained through spoils of war over defeated enemies. When the two sides approach, these warriors are often at the point of first contact, and along with other heavy infantry and the champions of their tribe form a powerful team of shock troops. They start it all off with a headlong charge, sword first, straight into the heart of the enemy lines. These soldiers are well armed and armored, but they are slowed down by all their protection and would need to allow faster allies to catch lighter troops that tend to target these slower warriors.

    While superbly skilled and extremely tough, they are not always inclined to fight as a tight cohesive military unit, so they need to be watched closely in battle. Being at the forefront of nearly all Gallic battle formations, personal glory, the lust for riches and fame, and the need to kill is something these warriors live for. They are, however, armed to the teeth with equipment made by the impeccable Belgic craftsmen and metalworkers. These Eburones tribesmen consist of freemen and those that are somewhat wealthy. Many have a long and meaningful education under druid teachings to understand the ways of their Gods, and not be fooled by the temptation of greedy outsiders who foolishly think them simple barbarians. They are not to be taken lightly by an enemy, or he'll find his head in his lap!

    Great Celtic warriors were apart of the major expeditions and invasions that came out of the Celtic realms and onto the scene of the classical world. In 391 B.C. at Clusium forces of Lingones and Senones crushed the Romans which was followed by another victory at Allia in 390 B.C. They also fought bravely with their spear wielding kinsmen, the gaesatae, at Telamon in 225 B.C. Thousands fought as mercenaries under Hannibal of Carthage at Trebbia in 218 B.C. and in 217 B.C. at Lake Trasimene. They marched with Brennus by the thousands into Greece in 279 B.C. These warriors would find employment as freemen up until the time around the fall of Alesia and Uxellodunum in the west. In the east, free Celts could still be found in Galatia, serving as mercenaries in Asia Minor. After that, they would fill Roman ranks as auxiliaries and cavalry. However, the name and deeds of their most notorious leader, Ambiorix, whose story is told as a Belgic noble, would be the defining point of the Eburones tribe, and keep their deeds and tragic story alive for centuries to come.








    Bellovaci Infantry





    The Bellovaci are among the greatest warriors of the Belgae confederation. Due to the remote nature of their homelands, armor is not very common so these warriors have learned to do without it. By remaining unarmored like many Belgae, they have honed their abilities of speed, ambush, and stealth to do great deeds in war and in the face of combat. Despite this, they have finely crafted Gallic helmets and shields to bring to battle. They rely upon the javelin to do it's deadly work as it flies into the ranks of enemy warriors. After these are used they will close for hand to hand combat most eagerly! These are excellent medium infantry to have present on the battlefield.

    As Caesar marched north into Gaul, he first came upon the Remi tribes, surprising them into submission before they could effectively join the other Belgae in fighting against the Roman invasion. Rome was slowly gaining domination of the rest of Gaul and the Belgae viewed this with dread and an underlying feeling that they would be next, like their brothers in other parts of Gaul, to loose their freedom to Roman domination and greed. The Remi informed Caesar of the situation that he would face by marching into the Belgic homelands. They informed him that the Bellovaci were the most numerous of the Belgae and the most influential. According to the Remi, they could send into battle 100,000 warriors and promised that 60,000 would be picked men. The Remi stated it was the Bellovaci that maintained the leadership of this particular rebellion. However, this one particular time, the Bellovaci submitted to the Romans without a fight, and gave up 600 hostages to Rome. However, it was not over for the tribe.

    The Bellovaci had the reputation of being the finest soldiers in Gaul, and among the Belgae, the most most warlike, while their brothers in the Nervii were considered the most fierce and the best fighters, according to Caesar. During Vercingetorix and his campaign against Rome, it was intended that all of the Gauls should send their full contingents of soldiers to the cause. However, the leaders of the many tribes feared that with so many warriors present that maintaining control over their own tribal contingents would be too difficult, not to mention securing enough grain, corn, and provisions for so many men. This being taken into consideration, each tribe was to send a reduced amount of men. The Bellovaci were ordered to sent 10,000, but refused. They were planning on fighting the Romans on their own terms instead. Despite this, the Bellovaci decided to send 2,000 in a gesture of friendship. After Alesia had fallen and Vercingetorix defeated, it could be said that Gaul was all but conquered. But after these events, more revolts would would spring up in the wake of that one. The Carnutes soon revolted along with the Bituriges and the Bellovaci. In this particular instance, a leader named Correus led the Bellovaci against Caesar. In their camp, and with the Romans approaching, the Bellovaci created huge fires to screen their retreat, lest they become trapped like Vercingetorix had been earlier. The Roman foraging parties up until this time had been under constant attack by Belgic warriors on foot as well as cavalry. From a prisoner Caesar learned of an ambush in place not far from the Bellovaci position where large stocks of provisions had been kept. This was sure to attract the Roman foraging parties.

    The following engagement is a classic example Gallic courage and tenacity in battle, against Roman discipline and order. Caesar notes that his soldiers knew the ambush was planned, but not exactly where it would take place. As the Romans cavalry and light infantry columns arrived, the Bellovaci attacked with 6,000 crack troops and 1,000 cavalry. The Bellovaci cavarly attacked first, possibly with Correus leading them. Caesar mentioned that unlike many cavalry actions where troops bunch up, thus causing tremendous casualties, the Romans did not do this and their cavalry maintained a manageable order. After a back and forth struggle with each section of ground hotly contested between the two sides, the Roman forces had to give ground to the Gallic cavalry, especially as the Bellovaci infantry arrived from out of the forest in support. At this point, the Roman light infantry, who had marched with the cavalry, was rushed to assist the cavalry and fought bravely among them. The legions were still a ways away, but knowing this, and also knowing that Caesar himself was near with added legions, the Romans fought twice as hard so as not to have to share any glory that could be attained from victory. Eventually the Bellovaci broke and fled, hampered by natural obstacles. Nearly all were pursued and killed. However, Correus did not surrender when offered quarter, nor did he flee into the woods. Caesar writes that Correus fought on gallantly and not without effect, until the Romans, in a frenzy of rage, shot him down.





    Treverii Cavalry





    Coming directly from the skillful trainers and veteran cavalry, the Treveri cavalryman will sometimes have need for better protection, such as helmets and larger shields, when going off to war. When they equip themselves in this manner, the medium cavalry wing is born. Their helmets are of true Gallic make and model. Such superior helmets of Gallic make and design were adopted by the Romans eventually. The Gallic saddle enables a more effective strike from the riders weapons as they are extremely secure and firmly placed in the saddle than riders in common saddles. For the sake of speed, these horsemen do not wear armor, instead they rest all hopes of victory on their skill with their javelins, raining them down upon their targets, and when those are used up, they bring their close combat spear to arms and continue the fight in that manner. Though these riders can travel rapidly across the field of combat, the best Belgic generals will not risk these men in fighting heavily armed infantry or cavalry front the front, but would have them charge the back of these formation in order to achieve the best killing rate possible. This wing of Treveri cavalry can handle lightly armed troops with ease, though with any cavalry, spearmen can mean trouble.

    During the great Gallic War, the Treveri were known to be of mixed Celtic and Germanic bloodlines. Strabo lists them as a Gaulish tribe. Tacitus assigns them a Germanic descent. The Treveri leaders had Celtic names, however, such as Cingetorix and Indutiomarus. Caesar himself admitted that their cavarly was mighty, and gave much trouble to his own army. The Treveri government was believed to be an elective monarchy where the chiefs and king shared relative power with each other. In the later era of the Roman Empire, a city of their name and in their lands, Trier, would be a prominent city within the Empire.

    Along with the Gauls of times past, Celtic tribal cavalry were apart of all the major expeditions and invasions that came out of the Celtic realms and onto the scene of the classical world. In 391 B.C. at Clusium forces of Lingones and Senones crushed the Romans which was followed by another victory at Allia in 390 B.C. Tribal cavalry forces and chariots fought bravely with their spear wielding kinsmen, the gaesatae, at Telamon in 225 B.C. Thousands of cavalrymen fought as mercenaries under Hannibal of Carthage at Trebbia in 218 B.C. and in 217 B.C. at Lake Trasimene. They rode with Brennus by the thousands into Greece in 279 B.C. These warriors would find employment as freemen up until the time around the fall of Alesia and Uxellodunum in Gaul. In the east, free Celts could still be found in Galatia, serving as mercenaries in Asia Minor. After that, they would fill Roman ranks as auxiliaries and cavalry.







    Nervii Infantry





    Fighting prowess, as with all Celtic warriors, was the measure of a man. The Nervii are an excellent example of this. A cut above most unarmored swordsmen, the Nervii are respected by all fellow Belgic tribes in their warrior tradition. Their equipment gives them a great advantage over other unarmored opponents, even giving many medium and some heavily armed foes a run for their money. To battle they bring javelins to hurl from a distance, but not too many as that is a skirmishers job and these warriors are eager for close combat! Though large shields do well protecting the Nervii warrior from the axe, spear, and sword of his enemies, where the Nervii warrior's advantage truly shines is their superior swordsmanship and tenacity in melee combat. These swordsmen are a cut above many other Belgic swordsmen and they can force their way through powerful enemies by their swordplay and skill alone.

    Far away from most of Gaul, the northern Gallic tribes were set apart from their Celtic neighbors, like the Arverni directly to the south, and those in the east. Many Gallic tribes migrated across the Rhine in great numbers, though they were not considered a Germanic people simply because of their geographical location on the other side of the Rhine. Intermingling and trading with the brave Germanic tribes, these Gauls would have picked up on the best warrior aspects of these German tribesmen, many of whom possessed their own traditions and cultures. This, in addition to their own superior Celtic weapons, metalworking, and crafting culture, meant that overtime these Gauls could perhaps be considered the best of both the Celtic and Germanic worlds. Hundreds of years and many generations after these migrations, in the time of the Roman invasion, the Belgae were a group of tribes that Caesar at least thought was somewhat set apart from both the regions and people residing in regions of the Gauls and the Germans, and of these, the Nervii were the most fierce in war.

    The Atrebates, Veromandui, and particularly the Nervii, would have arguably came closest to defeating Caesar in the entire Gallic War. This near victory would take place during the battle of the Sambre river in 54 B.C. This battle would go into history as a testament to the ferocity and bravery of the Belgic warrior. Caesar had earlier defeated the Germans invading Gaul under Ariovistus and now was to go to northern Italy, but received reports that the Belgae were forming a coalition against him, fearing that if the rest of Gaul was under Roman rule then they would be the next to fall at Caesar's hand. Caesar raised two new legions and quickly marched north towards Belgic lands. His rapid march surprised the Remi tribe, who sent out two leading men within the tribe, Andecombogius and Iccius, stating that all they had was at Caesar's disposal as well as providing intelligence for the Belgae and how many warriors each tribe was promising. After three days marching into Nervii territory, the Romans learned they were ahead and awaiting them on the other side of the river Sambre. Some of the Gauls marching with the Romans kept in mind the marching order of the Romans which was a legion followed by a baggage train, followed by another legion then another baggage train and so on. These Gauls kept this marching order in mind and deserted to tell the Nervii. They believed that to destroy the legion that arrived first would dishearten the rest of the Romans behind them. The Nervii agreed that once the first baggage train appeared, the attack would begin. (However, with the enemy close by Caesar had changed the order of the march and brought six legions to bear in front of the baggage and not a single legion as he had previously).

    On their side of the river, the Romans were just starting to trench for base camp atop a hill that descended evenly down towards the river. On the other side of this river was a clearing with thick forest and hedges behind it. This is where the Atrebates, Veromandui, and Nervii warriors were waiting. Caesar sent an advance force, cavalry, slingers, and archers, out to scout the opposite side of the Sambre. Here, the river was only about 3 feet deep. This Roman force crossed the river and began engaging the Nervii cavarly, which kept moving backwards to the nearby forest. The Roman force was giving fight but did not dare risk pursuing into the forest. From their hiding places in the forest, the Belgae warriors finally saw the roman baggage train appearing in the distance on the Roman side of the river making it way to camp. It's arrival was their signal to attack. The Belgae quickly routed the cavarly, slingers, and archers that crossed the river. They sped across the clearing, across the Sambre river to the Roman held side, and ran up the hill to the roman camp area. The six legions that had arrived ahead of the baggage train were busy making camp and digging the trenches when the Belgae began their attack. Totally caught off guard, the Romans had no time to pull covers off their shields, wear their helmets, nor form up into their own legions correctly. Instead, they rallied at whatever banner was closest to them. Caesar emerged and gave what commands he could, but the centurions, legati, and those under him in the Roman command structure gave further orders to organizing the fighting men.

    The Atrebates soon engaged the right section of the Roman line Here, members of the 9th and 10th legion were working, and their commander was Labienus. Once engaged, The 9th and 10th drove the Atrebates back across the Sambre, and due to the Atrebates exhaustion from the quick rush up the hill and being worn down by the pila, they were soon forced back across the river. The Atrebates made another stand on their side of the river, but were driven away a second time. Labienus took the enemy camp.

    In the Roman center, where members of the 11th and 8th legions were working, warriors of the Veromandui rushed to attack. Though the Romans drove them down the hill to the river, the Veromandui rallied, counter attacked, and held their ground bravely. The fighting continued here for sometime.

    On the Roman left, the Nervii, under their leader, Boguognatus, crossed swords with the 7th and 12th legions. A detachment of this Nervii force attempted to surround the two legions. They made way to the height of the hill where more of the camp area was located. The cavalry, slingers, and archers that were routed when the attack began had made it back to camp. Encountered the Nervii, they ran without resisting. The camp servants and the baggage train drivers fled in confusion as well. Its recorded that the Treveri cavalry, marching with Caesar, came upon the scene and the disorder within the camp. Seeing this state of chaos along with the legions in such strain against the Gauls, they left without fighting, returned to their homes, and reported the Romans had lost the battle. Caesar eventually made his way to the hard pressed 7th and 12th legions fighting the Nervii. After rearranging and organizing some of the line, these two legions regained courage in face of the attack. Around this time, Labienus, who was in the Belgae camp across the river, saw the dire situation the Romans were in against the Nervii, sent the 10th legion to help the 7th and 12th. Once the 10th legion recrossed the river and arrived in support, the Nervii could not withstand all this force brought to bear against them. The Romans achieved a close victory.

    This hotly contested Roman victory is a prime example of how superior Roman organization, training, and command structure saved themselves from total destruction. Despite victory, Caesar thought he had all but destroyed the Nervii. He obviously exaggerates when he mentions that only 500 warriors were left capable of bearing arms out of 60,000 warriors that made the attack. The Neverii warriors and fighting ability were not destroyed. 3 years later in 54 B.C. they rose again with Ambiroix of the Eburones tribe and others against the Romans. Here, Nervii warriors sent warriors to help besiege Cicero's camp. In 52 B.C., the Nervii tribe sent 5,000 warriors to aid the Arverni and allies, under Vercingetorix, in the last true threat to the Roman invasion of Gaul.








    Belgic Axemen





    Axes and swords are a favorite weapon of many warriors in the Belgae tribes. Learning to fight with two weapons, such as the sword and spear, is a true feat for any warrior. Mastering one weapon over all others is considered a greater deed among all the proud men called to war. Swinging their well crafted axes and blocking with their shields, the axeman is a excellent unarmored medium infantry force that does not back down from any challenger. These axemen are often used as shock troops at the very front of fighting against their enemies. Other chiefs send in their best champions into battle with these warriors in tow, support flanks with their strength. Its well known by all that axes are very effective against many types of cavalry. This is widely known and causes them and the spear wielding tribesmen to often become rivals in this prestigious role, as the spearmen and axemen try to out do the other.

    Another advantage thats not to be overlooked is their many uses before battle starts in full. Though armor is rather hard to come by in Belgic lands for the common warrior, their unarmored state allows for quick and deadly ambushes and the ability to blend in easily and quietly in the countryside. In addition, these warriors are quicker than most would be in a medium infantry force. Unencumbered by armor, they can keep pace with all but the fastest light troops, and they can run after, catch, and engage heavier troops with ease and still manage to fight well with their weapons.

    The axe is one of the earliest weapons to be used in war, along with the sling, bow, and spear. Depending on it's weight, shape of the blade, and purpose, the axe can be crafted for many things, such as felling trees, butchering game thats has been caught and killed, splitting wood for the cold winters the Belgae endure, and as well as combat. The main weight of an axe is concentrated in the axehead resulting in momentum filled, powerful swings. These swings can impact body parts and armor in a somewhat similar fashion as a club but causing awful cleaving wounds that few can recover from intact. Overall, a commander can surely expect the axeman to cause more damage than an equivalently armed sword wielder. With the elite and heavily armored enemies that they would surely encounter, the axemen would likely need assistance from other Belgae warriors to tip the table in their favor or hold their section of the line against such opponents.









    Belgic Heavy Spearmen





    Gaul can be, in some ways, considered nation of spears it seems, as every tribe produces men trained to use the spear in some fashion. The heavy spearman is one such body of warriors with the bonus of being heavily armored and of a higher caliber than the common spearman. When defending against cavalry, these spearmen brace for the charge, striking without mercy, forcing heavily armored riders to bring themselves and their mounts out of the midst of such turmoil or die. Even the veteran troops of other nations would be hard pressed to overcome them without a struggle. In the normal Celtic formations, its often best to keep these spearmen in reserve, in case any holes open up in their battle line that need brave warriors to plug. If cavalry are present, the spearmen are perfect for marching at both ends of the formation, keeping an eye on any enemy warriors that might try to get around behind their position. Unlike the spearmen of other Celtic nations, these wear leather armor instead of chainmail. This is due to the expensive and rare nature of chainmail in the more remote areas the Belgae call home.

    Having a band of these spearmen within Belgae army forces is a must. For an enemy cavalry commander, they might even present the most fearsome Celtic force that can be sent against you. Against foot troops, they are still formidable opponents with their skill with the spear. Though the heavy swordsmen can do much of the same things that the spearman can do offensively, only the heavy spearman can do lethal amounts of damage to all grades of cavalry in a very short period of time while usually avoiding overwhelming injury to it's own spear group. Only the elite cavalry forces would cause a potential mounted problem for these warriors.

    As the Celts settled or were recruited into lands across Europe, Asia Minor, and Africa, they used the spear as their primary weapon (unless they were wealthy enough to have a sword forged for themselves, gained one from fallen enemies, or as a gift by their chief). Spears are easily made but vary in the quality aspect. Some spears would be all wood with it's point hardened by fire. Others would have simple metal points, or even elaborate blades with serrated edges, barbed tips, and other styles. Some spear heads have been uncovered and found in archaeological sites with gold designs accompanying the metal of the blade itself. This makes for a beautiful, yet deadly, killing weapon for the warrior that wielded such a magnificently crafted weapon.








    Belgic Light Swordsmen





    Belgic swordsmen are steadfast and aggressive warriors, a solid core of fighters for the leaders of Belgica, both on the continent and in Britain. They are not always ones to wait for the order to engage in battle, they are known to charge without orders sometimes. With their javelins, they use these before the charge or when enemies come within range and can function as skirmishers who keep their distance when commanded. They exhibit a strong sense of honor and bravery, making them over zealous to cross swords with any foe, but they are uniformly superb swordsmen and can be relied upon to do their best in battle. They are equipped with the trusted Gallic sword and large shields for protection. Their reputation as brave, reckless warriors, coupled with their frightening appearance, is an intimidating factor for most any enemy facing them. Though they wear no armor, their speed is an advantage against a slower enemy, as they can often use their speed to reach the optimal spots for launching an attack on the battlefield, such as behind already engaged enemies.

    The light swordsman that the Belgae train could have typically been a touch wealthier than his spear toting tribesman, or might have won his weapon through victory over other armies throughout the endless battle he fought. They are strong part of the backbone of every Celtic war machine. As they are, they can go toe to toe with similarly armed troops, and perhaps gain the upper hand, but against heavily armored opponents they will not stand for long and may easily break away from battle and rout when the tide has turned against them.

    Regardless, Celtic swordsmen were at one time found all across the world. They helped to compose the armies that became the bane of the Greek and Roman worlds. They helped to defeated the armies of many nations, including Grecian and Thracian armies in the 280-270's B.C., helped Hannibal kill 80,000 Romans at Cannae, as well as doing what Hannibal only dreamed of doing: taking Rome itself in 390 B.C.E! The Celts occupied Rome for seven months under their warlord, Brennus, and did not leave until they received an apology from the Romans (due to treacherous Roman diplomacy), and plenty of gold to show for it. They are recored as mercenaries and fighters in almost every army of the ancient world from the Iberian lands to Seleucid Syria, from Ptolemaic Egypt to The Bosporus and Black Sea regions. The value of these swordsmen is concrete throughout history.




    Belgic Light Spearmen





    Warbands are bound to the service of a strongman or petty village head. They are the basic type of levy infantry to be found in many Belgae warbands. They fight well as glory and loot are the road to status but are often difficult to control due to less lengthy and formal training for warfare. They care little for discipline and less for restraint, but they can be relied on to fight, and fight hard. It is up to each man to prove his own bravery and worth, so the savage charge into the enemy is about as sophisticated as they ever want to be! As with other lightly armed warriors, they are ideal men to have hide in forests preparing an ambush.

    These warriors consist of the poor, and the younger Belgic tribesmen who do not have the means to buy better weapons or pay for armor. This, however, does not count them useless in combat. Their unarmored nature allows them to remain hidden, and silent, in ambush. They can appear across the field of battle quickly due to their speed and easily surprise an unsuspecting enemy. This quickness also enables their kind to reinforce a weak part of the battle line in seconds, overtake fleeing enemies, or to pin down slower enemies until stronger units can arrive on the scene. When fighting against lightly armored horsemen, their sharp spears and sturdy shields offer an excellent offense and a strong defense against them. Use caution if you command these warriors to combat heavily equipped enemies, as they do not have the arms to last in a drawn out encounter if they do not have help.

    These unarmored spearmen take much from their neighbors and cousins, the Germanic warriors, living farther to the east. Through close contact and combat with them, they have adopted some Germanic fighting traditions into their own fighting style. First, this warband has chosen the club over the Celtic short sword as their secondary weapon for melee combat. Blunt force can be as deadly, if not more so, that a sword or spear against armored opponents. It can dent and leave impressions on solid armor. Results of these strikes can force the metal back into the flesh, bone, or skin of the wearer which causes painful bruises, bleeding, and even mortal injuries. While chainmail's flexibility can effectively block sharp edges and lessen impacts from a sword, spear, or knife due to it's close array of rings, chainmail can give way to a strong club strike easily. It's bludgeoning power can not be underestimated! Despite its reputation as a poor man's weapon, the club is still known to be a deadly weapon. These Belgae have also adopted from the tribes in Germania a simple wooden shield with little decoration or color, and like them, they wear less colorful clothing. Where other poorer warriors in other Celtic tribes can still afford some colorful dyes and patterned clothing, these warriors live in a land where many traders are kept at arms reach and not allowed to bring their softening effects of civilization into their world. For good or for bad, their dress reflects this.







    Belgic Roundshield Skirmishers





    With many free people of Gaul, the Belgae warrior would begin his trial by battle as a skirmisher. At a young age, his father, uncle, or other male member of the tribe would introduce him to the javelin, and his aptitude for war can often be judged by his performance. Beside their humble origins, they're armed with their clutch of javelins, a well made Belgic round shield, a knife, and their own wits. These skirmishers are one of the fastest, if not the most mobile foot unit that the Belgae can call upon. They often form up in battle as the force an enemy must contend with before the real battle begins with the other infantry. By a mighty volley of their javelins at approaching enemy infantry or cavalry, their missiles can help decimate a regiment and pick off slow moving foes, decreasing their offensive capability and threat to other friendly troops.

    Some skirmishers are members of the tribes that do not share an active professional interest in conflicts, but still offer themselves up to the benefit of the tribe during times of war. Although all Celtic tribes elevated cavalry and infantry heroics in their culture, the role of a skirmisher was not overlooked. The inexperienced warrior needed to cut his teeth in a real battle in a role other than front line hand to hand combat, so the tribes made sure to have a contingent of these skirmishers present in force during raids and tribal conflicts.








    Belgic Archers





    Each ancient nation fielded their own archers, some had emphasis on this art form, other with less. The Belgae fall within the latter. As the Gauls do not place honor and fame in hand with ranged combat, Belgic archery is restricted mainly to the hunt. Wild boar, deer, and other game find their end at the hands of Belgae archers more often than men would. However, as with archers of other nations, the arrow is deadly in the right hands, especially a bow in the hands of the experienced archer. The best targets for an archer would encompass any enemies that appear lacking armor or wearing little of it. To set sights on lightly armored troops and cavalry will help kill off their warriors faster than those with heavy armor. This leaves the enemy target with a much reduced force to fight with and helps tip the tide of victory more in favor to the archer's own side.

    Archers in all parts of Gaul were not used in a typical military manner in harmony with their counterparts from other nations. This is because these men hail from the forests and village homes, and are not true warriors in the Gallic sense. Their training is not aimed for the call of battle, and at the most, only small bands of them would even accompany an Arverni army to conquest. A shrewd commander with a different way of analyzing these hunters can easily utilize their advantage of ranged combat, and mold them into a dangerous group on the battlefield. When the Belgae were roused to war, it goes without saying the archery was invaluable to them. Where Romans and Greeks establish the logistical organization of supply and provisions considered mandatory, the Belgae would likely have hunted using their archers to gain provisions during many campaigns.

    Overall, archery was a neglected aspect of Gallic culture on the whole. The main use of archery was emphasized for the hunt, not for war.







    Belgic Slingers





    Slingers are a low cost, but very effective unit to have around. They wear no armor and carry a short sword and a small leather bag full of these stones. Of all Belgic troops that are sent to battle, the slinger ranks among those that should never engage in melee unless absolutely needed. They can successfully melee with other slingers and archers, but little else. Their low equipment costs and ready availability of their favorite weapon, a smooth stone, provides the tribes with low cost troops that can kill enemies from a much greater distance than skirmishers and are found in all Belgic settlements. They are twice as deadly if they can quickly each positions behind the lines of their enemies where the protection of armor, bones, and skulls are all much easier to breech.

    The art of slinging is very old, and is considered one of the first missile weapons to be invented by ancient man. Sling stones can be found in every land imaginable. The equipment of a slinger is not at all impressive, and it does not need to be. They carry on them a combination of items that will kill a person as quick as a lethal sword, axe, or spear strike from a veteran warrior, only this time, the mortal wound can come from a simple commoner or poor tribal member. The impact of a well released stone at high speeds would not always bounce off of armor, but would dent and smash it. If the bullet found an unprotected part of a target, then the stone would fracture and shatter bones, skulls, teeth, and cause deep impact bruises and even internal bleeding in some cases.

    When a slinger's bullet is launched correctly, it's with a quite hiss, and then they vanish, speeding towards their target. They are almost invisible at this point, and its hard to detect their precise trajectory. Too many times has a group of soldiers had no idea they are targeted until its too late, and several members of their regiment are dead on the ground and another volley of bullets already flying their way.

    Celtic tribes had slingers aplenty in oppida warfare and sieges, where the slingers would position themselves above the wall on the ramparts, and send deadly stones down to the victims below. To be both a Celt and slinger was not the most glorious profession to acquire skills in. Many looked at ranged warfare as womanly and unmanly since you wouldn't experience honorable close combat. Unlike the archer, Belgae slingers use a shield for protection while they are managing the sling with the other hand. They also carry a short sword for emergencies when they are needed.







    Belgic Light Cavalry





    Light Cavalry are not very numerous in Belgic lands compared to other Celtic realms. They remain unarmored and carry spears and shields. They are best used as scouts and in pursuit of fleeing enemies. They travel atop sturdy, sure-footed ponies with rapid bursts of speed that can relieve the rider of hazardous situations and keep his distance from his target at the same time. They can appear anywhere on the battlefield in seconds or as ambushers hiding in the long grasses and trees until the right moment presents itself. For these horsemen to engage other lightly armored units is appropriate and what they are equipped for. They are unlikely to be very effective against heavy infantry and heavy cavalry, both whom they can outrun if things are going badly. However, if they run out of javelins its best to begin attacks and charges with these horsemen that aim for the sides or behind their opponents positions.

    "The whole race of Gauls are madly fond of war," states Strabo the geographer. "Although they are all fighters by nature, they are better as cavalry than as infantry...the best of the Roman cavalry is recruited from among them." Gallic cavalry was indeed the best overall branch of Gallic warfare. They took part in every battle and skirmish across Gaul, and showed up in battles raging into the Italian peninsula, Asia Minor, Iberia, Britain, Germania, Greece, and countless other places in Europe theres no record of. Under Hannibal, light cavalry they accompanied his warriors all over Italy and even into Africa, performing admirably in many battles, such as sealing the encirclement the famous Cannae battle in 216 B.C.E. They utilize long spears to keep their edge against lightly armored infantry, and their well bred Gallic mounts are the quickest to be found.

    In the event that the Romans conquer all of the Belgic lands, as they did historically, they may be able to recruit this exceptional cavalry in droves...which they did by promising Roman citizenship and lands of their own. Even to the Romans, these Gallic horsemen were the best kind of cavalry in their minds, eagerly recruiting them for their own cavalry formations over the years and taking up the ancient cavalry training exercises of the Gauls for use by their own cavalry.









    Belgic Chieftain








    A popular and famous helmet, the Battersea helmet was found in the river Thames.

    A wise Belgic warlord surrounds himself with fierce warriors as a personal guard, recruiting them from selected members from all the noble houses allied with the tribe. Their numbers and ferocity are enough to be a significant force should the need arise. Only they who would fight to the death without hesitation. Every warlord of the Belgae commands by right of personal courage as much as tactical skill, and must prove himself in battle. He and his guards have the trappings and weaponry of nobility. They do not hesitate to dash to any point on the battlefield. The warlord can inspire his men to greater efforts just by his presence, encouraging his warriors to fight even harder, and increase the struggle for victory knowing that they fight under his gaze.

    Celtic chiefs are cast in the light of heroism. Camulogenus, of the Parisii tribe, broke off friendship with the Romans to support Vercingetorix in the Gallic revolt. Ultimately, they were defeated and subjugated after is battle of Lutetia in 52 B.C. The warlord Brennus is another chief who lead the Senones at the battle of Allia, obliterating the hastati, triarii, and principes sent against them, and preceding to follow up on that victory with the occupation of Rome in 390 B.C.E. Another Brennus defeated the Greeks at Thermopylae by using the same pathway through the mountains that the Persians used hundreds of years prior against the Spartan and Thespian defenders. It is worth mentioning as well, that he was a chief that had ties with the Celtic tribes that would migrate into Asia Minor, who are known from then on as the Galatians. Noble Vercingetorix of the Arverni dealt Julius Caesar his first defeat at the oppida of Gergovia in 52 B.C.E. After the fall of Alesia and the capture of Vercingetorix, the spirit of Gallic resistance was not entirely over, and many kings and chieftains kept the flame alive. Other notable chiefs were Correus, king of the Bellovasci, who died in battle against Caesar, and Dumnorix, who shouted that he was a "free man in a free state" mere moments before his death. In Britain, Caratacus, Boudicca, Calgacus, Cassivelaunus, and others led the spirit of British resistance against foreign aggressors on their island.












    THE BRITONS





    Caledonian Infantry






    Discovered in Northern Britain, this helmet was thought to have been used sometime between 50-150 A.D. Its made of copper alloy with repousse ornament on the neckguard

    Coming from the highland mountains and hills northern Britain, the Caledonians are on the northern fringe of the Celtic world as it were, and they have a much different standard of living. They are rather unaccustomed to the lifestyles that other Celts take for granted. Regardless, the Belgae have heard many great stories of their bravery in battle, thus seeking out their warriors and nobility in friendship against any who challenge them. These Caledonians are equipped somewhat well off, compared to others in their lands. They have a helmet made of copper of northern British variety, and a well made sword for battle. Their small roundshield is a symbol of their region's military culture. Like other warriors that inhabit this isle, they are accustomed to the the blue dye that protects them when they fight, signifying their allegiance to their chosen gods or goddesses, and their own bravery.

    The name Caledonian is thought to mean, "Men of the Woods." They were a fierce nation, forming a type of confederacy of tribes and clans. The Roman governor of the south, Gnaeus Julius Agricola, launched a campaign to the north sometime around 80 A.D. In describing the land of the Caledonians, one Roman commander stated that it was where "the world and all created things come to an end." Eventually the Caledonians, under Calgacus, faced the Roman general Agricola in 84 A.D. at Mons Graupius. This site has never been identified with certainty. Tacitus writes the Romans were fielding around 20,000 soldiers to the Caledonian's 30,000 warriors and chariots. The Romans had to march uphill and through a "dense shower of darts," and the battle reportedly lasted most of the day. The casualties were 10,000 Caledonians having fallen while an exact figure of 360 Romans perished, though this does not specify if these numbers were only among the legions, the auxilia, or both. Regardless of how many Romans perished, this battle must have hurt the Roman capacity to sustain a military occupation more than what was written. No sooner had they won at Mons Graupius, the Romans withdraw to the south and do not settle or occupy their newly won territory. The Romans fought for around 4 years without completely defeating the native confederacy. Despite the Roman domination of the southern half of the island, the northern regions were walled off by not just one wall, but two. Hadrian's Wall was constructed in 120 A.D. to keep the boundary between the two halves of the island. Later, the Antonie Wall was established further north in around 138 A.D. by Antoninus Pius, only to be later abandoned with Hadrian's Wall again forming the northern frontier for Rome in 164 A.D. During the campaign of Septimus Severus, the Caledonians tribes avoided pitched battle against such a superior force. However, the historian Dio Cassius mentions the Romans lost 50,000 soldiers during this time. This extremely high number is probably an exaggeration as well of the real casualties the Romans actually sustained, but should reflect the overall situation and difficulties the Romans faced in Caledonian lands at the "edge of the world."






    Brythonic Skirmishers





    The Britons are an island full of ready warriors, and many of them are found swelling the ranks of skirmishers. They appear together in ever increasing numbers, bearing witness to the perfect aim and tactics that help make up theses skirmishers fighting for the Belgae. Besides their javelins, they bring a shortsword to the battle and their shield giving them additional fighting chance when their javelins have been spent piercing the bodies of their foes. Virtually any lightly armored opponent will feel the bite of these quick warriors in hand to hand combat, and they are quick enough to continually surprise attentive opponents with their lust for battle!

    This band is considered true veterans from all over the Isles of Britain in the act of whittling away at the opponents numbers before battle is joined in earnest. As with the unique personalities of all warriors, the successful warrior did not always view the sword or axe, or even training with a cavalry wing, as the true manifestation of his abilities. The skirmisher role was open to all, and only the swiftest, cunning skirmishers in Britain would be invited into this rank of esteem and prestige. As long time participators in skirmishing, they help to train inexperienced youth eager for battle, as well as improve the overall technique of all combatants, keeping them all on par with each other in their chosen art form.









    Brythonic Spearmen






    The shield shape is based on a reconstruction of the wooden shield with bronze boss and fittings, which belonged to a Cantiaci warrior, priest, tribal leader, or king, from the Mill Hill cemetery, Deal, Kent and it dated around 200 B.C. The boss is an actual one found in the River Thames at Wandsworth, Middlesex dated between the 1st & 2nd century B.C. The shield boss was originally decorated in repousse ornament while depicting two La Tene style birds with outstretched wings


    The British Isles are, like any other Celtic enclave, ready to send spearmen out by the thousands at the call of their chieftains. The spearmen of Britain are on said to be on par with their continental brothers who also field armies full of spearmen themselves. The Belgae have arrived on their island and settled there, creating a small, yet strong extension of their homelands on the continent. These British warriors have thrown aside their differences and have allied themselves with their newly arrived brothers and fighting alongside them as equals, not enemies. Clinging to the old ways is a standard among their warrior dress, or lack of it. Fighting naked proves to themselves and to others that they are not afraid to die and that body armor from their armor smiths is certainly not needed to be able to kill you. As old as their tradition is, so is their assurance upon their strong weapons and agility to overcome the enemy in battle.

    Warbands are bound to the service of a strongman or petty village head. They are a common infantry type to be found in many British warbands. They care little for discipline and less for restraint, but they can be relied on to fight, and fight hard. It is up to each man to prove his own bravery and worth, and this is measured by their performance in battle. As with other lightly armed warriors, they are ideal men to have hide in forests preparing an ambush.

    These warriors consist of the experienced British tribesmen who have the money, wealth, and ambition to go on campaign with the warbands and armies of the Belgae, even going far into the continent to raid and plunder the riches found there. Though they do not pay for nor use expensive body armors of leather, metal, or chain, they always rely on their unarmored nature to remain hidden and silent in ambushes. They can also appear across the field of battle quickly due to their speed and surprise an unsuspecting enemy. When fighting against lightly armored horsemen, their sharp spears and sturdy shields offer an excellent offense and a strong defense against them. Against light and medium armored cavalry, they do very well, and when defending against horsemen, they do even better. Their definite quickness enables them, once the battle is won, to overtake fleeing enemies or to pin them down until stronger units and cavalry can arrive on the scene. Use caution if you command these warriors to combat heavily armored enemies. They obviously do not have the protective armor to last in a protracted battle against them.

    The shield shape is based on a reconstruction of the wooden shield with bronze boss and fittings, which belonged to a Cantiaci warrior, priest, tribal leader, or king, from the Mill Hill cemetery, Deal, Kent and it dated around 200 B.C. The boss is an actual one found in the River Thames at Wandsworth, Middlesex dated between the 1st & 2nd century B.C. The shield boss was originally decorated in repousse ornament while depicting two La Tene style birds with outstretched wings.








    Brythonic Slingers





    Almost an elite unit in itself, the Brythonic slinger is notably the best slinger in northern Europe. The Britons have a strong emphasis on slinging as a warriors art form, though many Celtic tribes, on the mainland particularly, place little emphasis on the art of slinging overall. The Brythonic slingers carry a traditional shield for protection while they manage the sling on their other hand. Their small square shield is commonly found in parts of the island and is a distinctly British style.

    Slingers are a low cost, but very effective unit to have around. They wear no armor and carry a short sword and a small leather bag full of these stones. Of all Belgic troops that are sent to battle, the slinger ranks among those that should never engage in melee unless absolutely needed. They can successfully melee with other slingers and archers, but little else. Their low equipment costs and ready availability of their favorite weapon, a smooth stone, provides the tribes with low cost troops that can kill enemies from a much greater distance than skirmishers and are found in all British settlements. They are twice as deadly if they can quickly each positions behind the lines of their enemies where the protection of armor, bones, and skulls are all much easier to breech.

    The art of slinging is very old, and is considered one of the first missile weapons to be invented by ancient man. Sling stones can be found in every land imaginable. The equipment of a slinger is not at all impressive, and it does not need to be. They carry on them a combination of items that will kill a person as quick as a lethal sword, axe, or spear strike from a veteran warrior, only this time, the mortal wound can come from a simple commoner or poor tribal member. The impact of a well released stone at high speeds would not always bounce off of armor, but would dent and smash it. If the bullet found an unprotected part of a target, then the stone would fracture and shatter bones, skulls, teeth, and cause deep impact bruises and even internal bleeding in some cases.

    When a slinger's bullet is launched correctly, it's with a quite hiss, and then they vanish, speeding towards their target. They are almost invisible at this point, and its hard to detect their precise trajectory. Too many times has a group of soldiers had no idea they are targeted until its too late, and several members of their regiment are dead on the ground and another volley of bullets already flying their way.

    -Trait/Ancillary/Building Editor

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity;
    and I'm not sure about the universe." -----Albert Einstein

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    Default Re: Roma Surrectum's Belgae Preview!

    CHARIOTS



    Long a misused, weak, and neglected aspect of Celtic warfare in RTW's many representations, the chariots return to the forefront of Celtic warfare in RS2. As all the Celtic factions will have access to chariots, these will cause many players to reconsider their tactics when these appear on the battlefield and adjust them accordingly. These will not be chariots that many players are use to using or fighting against (you know, the ones that crumble, rout, and fall apart just by looking at the enemy line :disgust:). The RS team will balance these chariots to be worth using, and exploiting, by the Celtic player on the battlefields as they were historically.



    Belgic Light Chariot







    The fastest, swiftest chariots to be found in British lands, the light charioteers do their skirmishing job as well as anyone can. With all chariots, once close enough to enemy infantry, and even some cavarly, they can cause a panic which would possibly help friendly forces nearby attain victory much sooner. This chariot is best used for skirmishing and scouting duties. Its as fast as light cavalry and can dart about the battlefield just as easy. If it is needed to engage anyone, it can successfully handle light infantry and skirmishers rather well, scattering them and breaking their formation. Once this happens, allied warriors or cavalry can head into this breech and take advantage of the chaos and fear these war machines have caused. Caution must be used if there are medium or heavily armed infantry, especially those with spears, and cavarly, as these chariots would be hard pressed and most likely loose in melee against them.

    Celtic chariots are very light and very fast, being made almost entirely of wood. The main metal components that a chariots would have been bolts fastening certain areas together, as well as metal plates to hold them. Metal sheeting sometimes covered the part of the wheel that contacts the ground, but many others have been discovered with only wood. In comparison to eastern chariots, such as early Egyptian and Syrian chariots, whose carriage could be light enough to be carried by one man, the Celtic chariots were a bit heavier and sturdier. However, in comparison to the heavily armored types of Pontus and the Seleucids, the Celtic chariots would likely be much faster initially and much more maneuverable due to it's lightweight and lack of metal in it's overall construction. Celtic chariots were open in the front of the chariot behind the horses, as well as behind, thus having only two sides. Eastern chariots would usually have had only the rear of the chariot open. The construction of the Celtic chariots would have allowed the crew to perform acrobatic feats while it was moving at high speed, something even Caesar noted their riders as doing.

    Chariots would be the possession of the more important figures of Celtic society in Britain, Ireland, as well as the continental tribes. Caesar wrote that many Celts used the chariot to travel to the battle. Against cavarly they would remain inside the chariot to fight them, but against infantry the warrior would dismount and fight on foot with their tribe other warriors on foot. While the fighting raged at a distance, the chariot's driver would usually remain at the side of the chariot and rush to the aid of the warrior if he was hurt and deliver him from further injury. Caesar noted that British chariot tactics involved speeding all over the battlefield throwing javelins at the enemy. The horses and the sounds the wheels and chariot made was often sufficient to throw the enemies ranks into disarray and disorder. By daily training the charioteers can maintain complete control, even on steep hills, to turn at a moment and control to horses at full speed.

    At the battle of Telamon in 225 B.C., the Insubres, gaesatae, Boii, and Taurisci brought 20,000 cavarly and chariots to the battle. Here, the chariots were featured as being stationed on the wings of the Celtic lines. Athenaeus mentioned the great Arverni king, Louernius, as riding over the land distributing gold and silver to all those that followed him. Another Arverni king, Bituitus, was displayed in Rome in a silver chariot, just as he had fought in during the battle of Vindalium in 121 B.C., which happened to be the last account of chariots used in continental Europe. Caesar's invasion of Britain is 54 B.C. was met after a time by the British chief, Cassivellaunus, and his 4,000 war chariots, which delayed the Roman's ability to freely maneuver through the region. The last mention of the war chariot in Britain was sometimes during Septimus Severus and his campaign into Caledonia, according to Dio Cassius, around 207 A.D.








    Belgic Heavy Chariot







    The Belgae and the Britons have formed a great military base within Britain, providing deadly infantry, great champions, quick horses, and skillful cavalrymen. Something that the great nobles and tribal warriors in the British Isles commonly employ in warfare is the chariot. These can be designated into light and heavy roles. Unlike the light chariots, the heavy chariot crew does not hesitate to engage in melee if need commanded to as it carries the most reckless and dangerous warriors into battle, flinging javelins all over the battlefield and bringing their swords down on any that are too near. Their tenacity provides excellent offensive ability against slow moving enemies as they can hit and run with ease, while their target cannot hope to out run nor out maneuver them. The well known sound of chariots and horses driving across the battlefield scaring the soldiers of the enemy, and affecting their morale, is well attested by Caesar, but these charioteers consist of Britons, wearing the woad paint which further increase their fanatical devotion to their cause. The crew of the heavy chariots possess the woad markings to further shock the enemy, as this practice is usually seen only in the British Isles. An exception is with the warriors of the Pictones tribes who are beside the great ocean in Gaul. They are also known to use their painted bodies in battle alongside the Arverni, in the same manner as the Britons do with the Belgae.

    Celtic chariots are very light and very fast, being made almost entirely of wood. The main metal components that a chariots would have been bolts fastening certain areas together, as well as metal plates to hold them. Metal sheeting sometimes covered the part of the wheel that contacts the ground, but many others have been discovered with only wood. In comparison to eastern chariots, such as early Egyptian and Syrian chariots, whose carriage could be light enough to be carried by one man, the Celtic chariots were a bit heavier and sturdier. However, in comparison to the heavily armored types of Pontus and the Seleucids, the Celtic chariots would likely be much faster initially and much more maneuverable due to it's lightweight and lack of metal in it's overall construction. Celtic chariots were open in the front of the chariot behind the horses, as well as behind, thus having only two sides. Eastern chariots would usually have had only the rear of the chariot open. The construction of the Celtic chariots would have allowed the crew to perform acrobatic feats while it was moving at high speed, something even Caesar noted their riders as doing.

    Chariots would be the possession of the more important figures of Celtic society in Britain, Ireland, as well as the continental tribes. Caesar wrote that many Celts used the chariot to travel to the battle. Against cavarly, the warriors would remain inside the chariot to fight, but against infantry, the warrior would dismount and fight with their fellow warriors on foot. While the fighting raged at a distance, the chariot's driver would usually remain at the side of the chariot and rush to the aid of the warrior if he was hurt and deliver him from further injury. Caesar noted that Britain chariot tactics involved speeding all over the battlefield throwing javelins at the enemy. The horses and the sounds the wheels and chariot made was often sufficient to throw the enemies ranks into disarray and disorder. By daily training the charioteers can maintain complete control, even on steep hills, to turn at a moment and control to horses at full speed.

    In Celtic chariot burials, it would typically be the greatest warriors, nobles, kings, queens, princes and princess that would be buried with a chariot. The crew of the heavy charioteer wear the famous Battersea helmet, which found in the river Thames, however. The horned horse mask was found in Northern Britain and dates to the 2nd century B.C. It is made out of bronze and could have been parade armor of some kind for the horse or pony that would have worn it. Celtic chariot burials have been found all over Europe where the Celts settled. In addition to finding burials in the traditional homelands of the Celts, some have been found in the Carpathian Basin and also in Tylis, between Macedonia and Thrace.









    BELGAE EXTRAS


    Here, the Arverni and the Belgae square off in the many battles and conflicts that rage across Gaul


    The gaesatae of the Arverni are always the first to seek out combat. They are hard pressed as they face a wave of Belgae and Brythonic warriors led by Caledonian infantry, who, in turn, are supported by the light and heavy spearmen




































    THANK YOUS & CREDITS


    The RS fans first and foremost! All of you give us the added encouragement and support to keep coding, skinning, typing, researching, and modeling away at this (so does DVK's whip ). The RS fans are the best in the entire RTW community! No doubt about that! This preview is definitely dedicated to all of y'all that support us!





    Screenshots: Brusilov & Tone
    Belgae models & skinning: Tone
    (Prometheus: Nervii infantry and Brythonic spearmen model and skin elements)
    Belgae Historical info: Mulattothrasher, Cherryfunk, Tone, and the entire RS team
    Unit Descriptions: Mulattothrasher
    Extra thanks: To DVK for making this mod. None of this would have happened otherwise.




    So, who does what on the RS team anyway?
    Many folks on the RS team are long time familiar faces, and most already know who is doing what (Dvk= creator & team leader, Tone = models and skins, etc...), but theres many newcomers to the team who provide much needed help, historical info, tips, and other things. Heres a little peek at the members in RS and what they do. Check it out!
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    In no particular order:
    - DVK? Is always coding and working on the DMB, EDU, and 3-D graphics.
    - Rantantan & Artax? 2D Art, faction icons, symbols.
    - SquidSK? Adding the traits and ancillaries with Nellup, and helping DVK with some of his work.
    - Tone, Hobo, leif_erikson, Burninator, & Bebbe? Always cranking out the awesome unit skins giving RS2 the visual edge in RTW.
    - Cherryfunk? He has his hands in a little bit of everything.
    - pseudocaesar and Keravnos? Just started working to unveil the Ptolemaic faction.
    - aja5191? RS1 & 2 publicity.
    - swhunter & Keravnos? Working on ideas and units for the Free Greeks faction that will be present all over the RS2 map.
    - Mulattothrasher? Unit descriptions and preliminary AOR/Barracks/Recruitment planning.
    - Pacco? Cranking out wonderful unit cards and helping with skinning shields and other things.
    - MarcusTullius? Doing the handy unit manuals with MacLiamLeah and assisting on the Ptolemaic preview.
    - Gotthard? Is working on an economic system for RS2.
    - Northern Ranger? The RS2 map guy.
    - Historians/beta testing/Extra help? traxx91, Drtad, The Fuzz, rominet, Jingle_Bombs, Daus Maximus Jade, Lost In Transition, Skandranon Rakshae, Brusilov, icydawgfish, HMonk, & Roman Man #3.
    - Lets no forget the hardcore Roman historians (DVK, pseudocaesar, rory o'kane, Horton III, Faridus, etc...) who are helping to shape up the most spectacular Roman faction yet in RTW (you can learn plenty just watching them argue )




    The RS team hopes everyone enjoyed the Belgae preview!

    -Trait/Ancillary/Building Editor

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity;
    and I'm not sure about the universe." -----Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    EB Concept Artist Member fenix3279's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roma Surrectum's Belgae Preview!

    I'll never grow tired of staring at these bea-u-ti-ful units. How is it that the RS2 team is able to achieve such a clarity and depth to their unit skins, unheard of in other mods? And I though RS2 was going to be a mod for RTW. Units that look as good as these could easily pass off as something out of M2TW. What's their secret? Added polygons? Professional skinners? There must be something. Keep up the fantastic work
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