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Thread: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

  1. #121
    Member Member Davil92's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Ok, i'll write my sources, but know that i did kind of a collage, and the info is scarse, but here are the sites: http://www.travelitaly24.com/categor...ations/taranto, of course the italian wikipedia is a good source for info and includes even more info than what i found....http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempio_...%28Taranto%29; http://www.tarantoincartolina.com/de...rticolo&art=99 and that should be all, some of them are in italian, so if you need any help in transalting them just ask! =)

  2. #122
    Member Member Davil92's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Was this useful?

  3. #123
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Arjos's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Davil, sono già occupati a fare l'ottimo lavoro che fanno (e lasciamoli fare così finiscono anche prima ^^).
    Hai postato le info, loro vedranno cosa fare, se dovessero aver bisogno d'aiuto ti contatteranno di sicuro ;)

  4. #124
    Member Member Davil92's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Aaah be certamente non vorrei farli rallentare è solo che mi piacerebbe sapere se il mio lavoro è stato utile!

  5. #125
    urk! Member bobbin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Yes, thank you Davil92.


  6. #126
    Member Member Ichon's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I posted this awhile ago in TWC but the Uplistsikhe caves in Georgia could potentially be an interesting wonder as that part of the map is rather empty. I haven't had time to look for more scholarly research aside from learning that there aren't many people working on it and much of the pre-Medieval period is rather undocumented. It appears from excavations already done that the current 150 caves are only a portion of the 700 or more likely present before several earthquakes and a couple millenia of erosion. There are signs of relatively widespread religious activities associated with the worship of Mitra or some other god which shares many common images like Mithras whose underground mithraea would make sense and that Mithras was associated with Persian or Zoroastrian culture is documented.


    The second are the places where Zoroaster received his visions. Near a river probably somewhere to north of present day Afghanistan then at various mountains and natural places around Medea or Bactria. No exact locations are now known but it would not be a huge stretch to include something like Mt Ushia-darena, supposedly the second location Zoroaster received the continuation of his vision by the river. Ancient Greeks seemed to have been fascinated by Zoroaster and some wonders in Bactria despite being undiscovered by modern archeology aside from a few inscriptions or very small places of worship seem justified especially with the lack of current wonders in that area.

  7. #127
    NOBAΛO AYΣE Member Ayce's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I haven't checked this forum out for a long time, and I don't know when I'm gonna get back into playing a Total War game, but I thought I'd pitch in with a suggestion here:

    The Sarmisegetuza Sanctuary:







    As well as the Danube Delta as a natural wonder.

  8. #128
    ###### of the Gladiators Member neo_deus's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Dont't know if this thread is dead/closed or if the team has already decided on a final list, but here goes nothing :)

    My suggestion is the now known as "Cromeleque dos Almendres" situated on a hill near the city of Évora, in Portugal. It's the largest megalithic monument in all the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most important in all of Europe.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    http://www.igespar.pt/pt/patrimonio/.../detail/69690/

    I'm sending this pics along with the link to the IGESPAR (institute for the management of the arquitectonic and archeologic patrimony) where you can find some more info. If you need some help translating from the portuguese, just give me a heads up.

  9. #129
    Member Member NikosMaximilian's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I don't know how far the EBII map will stretch, so may I ask if Lake Issyk Kul will be included?

    If so, these recent discoveries could be considered to give the Sakas a wonder.

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  10. #130
    That other EB guy Member Tanit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Any geographical feature which existed in 272 BC and is present on the EB1 map will be present on the EB2 map.



  11. #131
    Member Member fomalhaut's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    i had a question regarding the Lions Gate at the Mycenean citadel; was there a reason for its exclusion? it seems like a very obvious entry as a wonder and halfway through writing a request i realized there must be a reason for its exclusion, correct? Or am i over emphasizing its importance?

  12. #132
    ειδωλον Senior Member Teleklos Archelaou's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    The Greeks of the classical and hellenistic periods knew about it, but there doesn't seem to be much indication that they did that much about it. There was some tourist trade there near Mycenae (I seem to recall that touristy little axes sold near there that were like the one Agamemnon was killed with), but we don't have any real evidence that substantial numbers of people went out of their way to go there much or that it affected the local economy or would have caused (an imaginary anway) "boost" to morale for soldiers around there. And especially given all the other stuff in that province (Olympic Games, Statue of Zeus, Isthmian Games, Epidauros, Acrocorinth, Temple of Apollo at Bassai, tons of other temples, sanctuaries, etc.). The Lion Gate is very important archaeologically today (only surviving piece of monumtental Bronze Age art in Greece), but the amount if would merit inclusion vs those other things in the region is too weak.

  13. #133
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Arjos's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I don't know if this is already ingame or not, as it's quite famous I believe, and could be two or get coupled together:



    The terrace of the Lions to represent Delos, or to get more accurate Apollo's temple could be ok...
    Place should still wield some political influence...



    This is the other one, the sanctuary to Poseidon and Amphitrites in the near island of Tinos...
    A very good place for the hellenistic period, as it was the most important temple related to the sea, where the Poseidonia were held annually; and most of all it was the seat of the Nesiotic League (or league of the islanders) founded by Monophthalmos...
    People visited first Tinos to get "cleansed" and then moved to Delos...
    Could be cool if the region holding it rewarded with the trait of hegemon of the league, with influence bonuses and such; Philadelphos should already have it at the start date I think...
    Last edited by Arjos; 10-04-2011 at 17:55.

  14. #134
    New Member Member Justin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    First post here-

    I am going to post on topic, but first a quick introduction. I went on a research trip to Morocco a few years back, and I have compiled several natural sites that might be of interest to EB2. Also, I have been following this mod for quite a while so would like to contribute.

    Dadès Gorges



    "The Dades Gorge is a scenically beautiful section of the Dades River valley separating the Atlas Mountains from the Anti Atlas. The Gorge is best known for mesmerizing scenery and the Kasbahs set precariously amongst it overlooking the river below. Gravity defying rock stacks in all shades of red look as though they’ll crumble in front of your eyes and are deeply cut by gullies created by the persistent action of the river and weather. The road north from Boumalne Dades, with its switchbacks and magnificent views is a great way to see the gorge itself, but one that is clearly used by large numbers of tourists as is borne out by the increasingly esoteric mix of road side attractions, ranging from the traditional jewelry and fossil stands, to an elaborate full sized biblical scene in papier-mâché (including high-fiving messiah) on our most recent visit."

    From http://www.naturalhighsafaris.com/ex...rge-and-erfoud

    Erg Chebbi



    "The dunes of Erg Chebbi reach a height of up to 150 meters and altogether spans an area of 22 kilometers from north to south and up to 5-10 kilometers from east to west."

    -from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erg_Chebbi

    I have been to both of these locations and I can tell you that they are wonders. The sand dunes at Erg Chebbi are giant, enormous dunes, and really dwarf you. I had trouble climbing one of these dunes when I stayed at the oasis at Erg Chebbi. I know that EB2 is a historically accurate MOD which is the reason why I love it, so the only criticism I can give these two wonders is that the names supplied are from French (gorge) and Arabic (Chebbi) I don't know what they would have been called in ancient times. Berber tribes would have inhabited these regions as both of these locations lay beyond the Atlas and Anti-Atlas Mountains.

    The city of Volubilis (which is absent from EB1) was the provincial capital of Mauritania for Rome during the Empire period. However, their reach did not extend beyond the mountains (based on my knowledge of the area and site) so these two wonders would have been held by the Berber tribes and like I said I don't know what they would have called these two regions.

  15. #135
    Member Member sakhr's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Wonder
    The Marib dam, i dont know if this have been listed

  16. #136
    Speaker of Truth Moderator Moros's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    It was already in EB I.

  17. #137
    Strategist and Storyteller Moderator Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Suggestion: Thracian Burial Mounds
    Location: the Balkans (modern day Bulgaria and Macedonia)

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    There are approximately 60,000 burial mounds and sacred sites dating from Thracian times on Bulgarian soil, of which only 100 have been researched. Especially interesting is the "Valley of the Thracian Kings" (a modern name), a valley with more than 1000 burial mounds concentrated in a relatively small area. The oldest date from the late Bronze age, and the newest from the early Iron age. They doubled as burial sites and sacred places and are often filled with riches and works of art. If need arises, I can translate this and other articles on the matter.

    Suggested bonus: 5% global law bonus to your settlements if you hold the wonder. Cannot be destroyed. It grants a trait which adds +1 Influence to whomever visits the settlement which holds them (should probably be Serdica).
    Last edited by Myth; 11-19-2012 at 09:01.
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  18. #138
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Arjos's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Been reading about the Diadochoi recently and I think these two would be great additions:

    Oracle and Temple of Apollo in Didyma. The second most famous oracle, after Delphoi. It held panhellenic games and it was here, during the third successors war, that the oracle called Seleukos as "basileus", for the first time. (I think even among all the successors, as they still took the regency or the lordship/generalship of Europe and Asia). Nikator obviously paid for its reconstruction :P

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    And the Tyche of Antiocheia. Very important for the population, during those trouble times. Many cities quickly developed a cult for their icons of fortune. This particular one, would've had its own temple and was a large bronze statue (unfortunately, we have only roman copies today).

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

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  19. #139
    Hope Losted of Humanity&World Member KurdishSpartakus's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Gate Of ISHTAR & Hanging Gardens in Babylon

    Great Persepolis (takhte-Jamshid) In Persia

    Gates of Ctesiphon

    Temple of Mithra in SUSA & Kangawar & Urmiya

    unfortunately i cant bring you models and pics !!

  20. #140
    master of the wierd people Member Ibrahim's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    @ Aram: most of these already exist in game. I know the persopolis and Ishtar are in.


    Ctesiphon wasn't a major center at the time, so I don't know what it has to do with anything. I don't know enough about the cult of Mithra/Mithras to make a judgement.
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  21. #141
    Hope Losted of Humanity&World Member KurdishSpartakus's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibrahim View Post
    @ Aram: most of these already exist in game. I know the persopolis and Ishtar are in.


    Ctesiphon wasn't a major center at the time, so I don't know what it has to do with anything. I don't know enough about the cult of Mithra/Mithras to make a judgement.
    in EB II ?! really ?! and is seeing it on battle map possible?!

    about ctesiphon your right, it was major center in Sassanids !!

    mitha isnt a cult, but an ancient religion more older than even jewish, somehow extremely respect to nature and females, that infuenced greatly into ancient greeks culture and religions, into christianity, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism & many many aspects that require long discussion!

  22. #142
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Arjos's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Aram of Mada View Post
    in EB II ?! really ?! and is seeing it on battle map possible?!
    They are already in EBI and the Hanging Gardens are even on the battle map...

    As for Ctesiphon, it did not exist in 272 BCE, so it is out...

  23. #143
    Arrogant Ashigaru Moderator Ludens's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Aram of Mada View Post
    in EB II ?! really ?! and is seeing it on battle map possible?!
    I am not sure if it's possible to put them on the battle map. In EB1, the team simply reused the wonders from basic R:TW. However, this may not be possible in EB2.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aram of Mada View Post
    mitha isnt a cult, but an ancient religion more older than even jewish
    That's true (at least, if you accept that Judaism originated in the first millenium B.C.), although it's more correct to say that Mithra is a deity. For most of his "career", Mithra was just one god in a pantheon.

    Incidentally, "cult" does not always mean "sect". It can also mean devotion to a specific aspect of a religion - the cult of a saint, for example. In Classical religion, a cult refers to the worship of a specific deity, like Mithra or Isis. Hence, many European texts speak of the Mithra cult, as we are most familiar with Mithra as a Roman mystery cult that competed with early Christianity.
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  24. #144
    master of the wierd people Member Ibrahim's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Aram of Mada View Post
    in EB II ?! really ?! and is seeing it on battle map possible?!
    Persepolis is definitely visible: unless they've changed things around, it should be a provincial capital. As to the Hanging gardens? look, you asked if it would be in the game--to which the answer is obviously a yes. why you assume it has to be on the battle-map is a complete mystery.

    about ctesiphon your right, it was major center in Sassanids !!
    so why bring it up then?

    mitha isnt a cult, but an ancient religion more older than even jewish, somehow extremely respect to nature and females, that infuenced greatly into ancient greeks culture and religions, into christianity, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism & many many aspects that require long discussion!
    See Luden's answer....
    Last edited by Ibrahim; 06-07-2013 at 03:24.
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  25. #145
    Member Member mattgregg87's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Plutonium at Hierapolis, Plutonium in Latin, Ploutonion in Greek, (Pluto’s Gate)

    Plutonium near the Meander at Hierapolis (modern Pamukkale) was a deep cave with narrow opening (stomion), filled with misty poisonous vapors, which killed every animal entering the cave. Only the galli, eunuch priests of Cybele were able to enter the cave, either due to their techniques of holding their breath, or antidotes, or a phenomenon like enthousiasmos. The Plutonium has been identified: it comprises a deep chamber and a hole, 0.9m wide, emitting highly poisonous gases. Even in the courtyard in front of this chamber the smell is very sharp, and the doorway to the inner part of the Pltonium is blocked for security reasons. Thus ancient accounts of gas discharge have been verified by modern scientists and found precise.

    Though the exact age of the site is currently unknown, the nearby city of Hierapolis was founded around the year 190 BC by the King of Pergamum, Eumenes II.[3] The site is built on top of a cave which emits toxic gases, hence its use as a ritual passage to the underworld. Ritual animal sacrifices were common at the site. Animals would be thrown into the cave and pulled back out with ropes that had been tied to them. Archaeologists noted that the fumes emitted from the cavern still maintain their deadly properties as they recorded passing birds, attracted by the warm air, suffocated after breathing the toxic fumes.[3]

    The Ploutonion was described by several ancient writers including Strabo,[4] Cassius Dio and Damascius. It is a small cave, just large enough for one person to enter through a fenced entrance, beyond which stairs go down, and from which emerges suffocating carbon dioxide gas caused by underground geologic activity. Behind the 3 square metres (32 sq ft) roofed chamber is a deep cleft in the rock, through which fast flowing hot water passes releasing a sharp smelling gas.[5][3] Because people died in the gas, people thought that the gas was sent by Pluto, god of the underworld.[citation needed]

    During the early years of the town, the castrated priests of Cybele known as the Galli descended into the Plutonium, crawled over the floor to pockets of oxygen or held their breath. Carbon dioxide is heavier than air and so tends to settle in hollows. They then came up to show that they were immune to the gas. People believed a miracle had happened and that therefore the priests were infused with superior powers and had divine protection.[citation needed][4][6]
    The site was closed off during the Christian times in the 6th century AD but was rediscovered in 2013 by archaeologists.

  26. #146
    Member Member mattgregg87's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Sorry, I couldn't post links or images on my first post. I can't figure out how to do images anyway so here's a couple links.
    Pictures on the first and third link.

    http://www.ritmeyer.com/2013/04/02/the-gate-of-hell/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploutonion_at_Hierapolis

    http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/d...teway-to-hell/

  27. #147
    Member Member mattgregg87's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Sorry, I couldn't post links or pictures on my first post, I can't figure out how to post pictures anyway.
    So here's a couple links. Pictures on the first and third link.

    http://www.ritmeyer.com/2013/04/02/the-gate-of-hell/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploutonion_at_Hierapolis

    http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/d...teway-to-hell/

  28. #148
    Arrogant Ashigaru Moderator Ludens's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Hello mattgregg87,

    Apologies: your second and third post were put in the spam queue. I've put them back in the thread again.

    Thanks for your contribution. For the record: when copying material from another site, use quotation marks to make clear which bit of your post is quoted and which is original.
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    Member Member CanOmer's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Tombs of Lycia - Lycians, 5th century BC




    All pre-Greek people of Anatolia built beautiful monumental tombs associated with some form of ancestor worship. The Lycians developed this form of art to perfection, no doubt facilitated by the soft limestone of the region. The quality of stonemasonry of the Lycian people is noteworthy and is especially significant in the construction of tombs. Today the entire landscape of Lycia is still dotted with their fascinating funerary monuments. The most recent count has revealed one thousand and eighty-five examples still intact, rock-cut tombs being the most common form. Lycia is famous for the sheer number of tombs and their quality.

    One thing that sets Lycian tombs apart from Hellenistic tradition is that whereas in Hellenistic culture the dead were placed outside of liveable areas (often flanking main roads into the cities), Lycian tombs are often integrated right into cities, displaying Lycia's ties with eastern traditions. This is very noticeable, for instance, at Patara, where monumental tombs are proudly placed right alongside the harbor. A monumental temple-tomb is even located beside the huge imperial granary and the main trade center. The Lycians, in effect, were always living with their departed ones.

    The Lycians seem to have held a belief that the souls of their dead would be transported from the tombs to the afterworld by a sort of winged siren-like creature, and so often placed their tombs along the coast or at the top of cliffs when they were not integrated into the liveable areas of the cities.

    Further reading: http://www.lycianturkey.com/lycian_tombs.htm
    Short video about Lycian tombs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hp5BXVb-gQc

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hattush - Ruins of Hattian Capital, 12th century BC

    The first "settling in" around Boğazköy took place in the 6th millennium BC during the Chalcolithic period, when small widely scattered hamlets appeared most particularly on mountain slopes and rocky outcroppings.

    Late in the 3rd millenium BC, towards the end of the Early Bronze Age, a Hattian settlement developed, marking the beginning of continuous occupation at the site. The Hattians, native Anatolians, called their town Hattush.

    During the Middle Bronze Age the Hattian occupation grew into a city of such significance that a Karum was established here in the 19th and 18th centuries BC - a trading post of Assyrian merchants who had come from Assur. With their caravans of donkeys they transported goods to and from Mesopotamia, and along their route they also dealt in local Anatolian products, thus stimulating a certain "globalization". It was these Assyrian traders who first introduced writing to Anatolia.

    The ruins excavated demonstrate that the city of Hattush was burned down in a great conflagration around 1700 BC. Responsible was King Anitta from Kussar, who also put a curse on the site. But already by the second half of the 17th century BC the temptation to settle here again had obviously become overwhelming, for a Hittite king had indeed chosen the site as his residence and capital. The Hattian Hattush was now the Hittite Hattusha, and the king took the name of Hattushili, or "one from Hattusha." This is the beginning of the story of the Hittite capital and the Hittite Royals - until now, 27 kings are known by their names.

    The Old Hittite city comprised an area of almost 1 square kilometer; it was protected by a massive fortification wall. On the high ridge of Büyükkale was the residence of the Great King, and the city lay on the slope below to the northwest, reaching to the valley below. In the course of time great effort was spent on the development of the Upper City. This area south of the Old City was included into the city limits through the erection of a new 3.3-km long defense wall with several monumental gates, thus bringing the size of the city to 182 hectares. Within the wall a great many large structures were built, among them many temples - houses for "the Thousand Gods of the Hatti Land". (Source: http://www.hattuscha.de/English/cityhistory1.htm )

    The End of the Capital City Hattusha (ca. 1200/1180 BC)

    With the decline of its great empire, the capital lost its influence and thereby also its role as a political, economic and religious center. Little by little its residents drifted away and certainly the last known Hittite king, the Great King Shupiluliuma II, son of Tudhaliya IV, did not remain in Hattusha to the bitter end. He may well have moved his court elsewhere, thus sealing the fate of the city.

    Various complexes of the Empire period-the royal palace, certain temples, and stretches of the fortification walls among them-reveal signs of a fiery destruction. At least part of this devastation can only be attributed to the hands of an enemy. When the invaders entered the city, however, they must have found it nearly deserted, for the rooms destroyed by the fire had already been virtually cleared of their contents. Only what was worthless or stationary had been left behind. To the former category belong the records, the documents on file in the clay tablet archives; to the second, furnishings such as the huge storage vessels in the temple magazines.

    Until very recently we were dependent entirely on speculation as to who was responsible for the final desertion of the Hittite city. No trace whatever had been found of invaders who took over the site and settled here. It was assumed that the Kashkans, the restless northern neighbors of the Hittites, had dealt the dying city the fatal blow. Finally in 1996 the small settlement of a foreign population was discovered on the ridge of Büyükkaya. These people, who were by no means Hittites, settled down here after the desertion of the city. With them begins the Iron Age history of the site.

    The Hellenistic/Galatian Period

    The Asian expedition of Alexander the Great marks the beginnings of the Hellenistic period in Asia Minor. Although at first it had little impact on Central Anatolia, in the first half of the 3rd century BC Celtic Galatian emigrants from central Europe settled here. The site of Tavium near the village Büyük Nefesköy some 20 km south of Boğazköy became the seat of the Trokmer clan, who took the land around Hattusha/Boğazköy under their control. Büyükkale once again became a fortified citadel, and a small village occupied part of what had been the Lower City. The painted pottery characteristic of the Galatians was recovered here, as well as vessels imported from the Hellenistic cities along the west coast.

    Further reading: http://www.hattuscha.de/English/cityhistory2.htm

    The Lion Gate


    The Rampart of Yerkapı, Sphinxgate


    Temple 5 with the King's Gate in the background


    The King's Gate


    Chamber 2, The Hieroglyph Chamber


    The Royal Citadel of Büyükkale


    More photos and reconstructions: http://www.hattuscha.de/English/citytour.htm
    Last edited by CanOmer; 01-14-2014 at 21:05.

  30. #150
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    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Travertine Terraces at Phrygia

    Deriving from springs in a cliff almost 200 m high overlooking the plain, calcite-laden waters have created at Pamukkale (Cotton Palace) an unreal landscape, made up of mineral forests, petrified waterfalls and a series of terraced basins. At the end of the 2nd century B.C. the dynasty of the Attalids, the kings of Pergamon, established the thermal spa of Hierapolis. The ruins of the baths, temples and other Greek monuments can be seen at the site.







    Long Description
    This site is exceptional by vurtue of its superlative natural phenomena - warm, heavily mineralized water flowing from springs creating pools and terraces which are visually stunning. It is on this outstanding natural site that Hierapolis, an exceptional example of a Graeco-Roman thermal installation, was established. The Christian monuments of Hierapolis constitute an outstanding example of an early Christian architectural complex.
    Pamukkale, which literally means 'cotton castle', is the name the Turks gave to the extraordinary site of Hierapolis. The name was inspired by the preternatural landscape of bizarre forms created by calcite deposits from the hot springs that surface through a fault: mineral forests, petrified cascades and terraced pools of an immense natural nymphaeum. The ancients attributing healing powers to the hot springs (35 °C) equal to their power to metamorphose the landscape, they founded a thermal station on the site in the late 2nd century. The history of Hierapolis followed the same course as many Hellenistic cities in Asia Minor. The Romans acquired full control of it in 129 BC and it prospered under its new rulers. It was a cosmopolitan city where Anatolians, Graeco-Macedonians, Romans and Jews intermingled. The hot springs which attracted throngs of people 'taking the waters' also served another purpose: scouring and dying wool.
    Further reading: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/485/
    Last edited by CanOmer; 01-14-2014 at 21:06.

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