Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 153

Thread: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

  1. #31
    iudex thervingiorum Member athanaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Lusitania
    Posts
    1,085

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Mount Ślęża is already in EB I, as "Ślęża-Radunia-Complex".

    Kogaionon is in Dacia, and already in, too.




    Swêboz guide for EB 1.2
    Tips and Tricks for New Players
    from Hannibal Khan the Great, Brennus, Tellos Athenaios, and Winsington III.

  2. #32
    Legatvs Member SwissBarbar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Helvetia
    Posts
    1,904

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbin View Post


    The Ribemont-Sur-Ancre Battle Shrine
    Built between 280-260bc this shrine marks the site of a truely monumental battle between the Belgic Ambiani and the Gallic Armoricani where around eight hundred people are believed to have died. The victorious Ambiani erected this shrine to celebrate the great battle, they decapitated the bodies of the defeated Armoricani warriors taking the heads home with them as trophies, the headless corpses and thousands of weapons collected from the battle feild were hung from a large wooden platform as a clear symbol for all too see of the might of the victors and the power of thier gods.
    As for their own dead the Ambiani collected their bones and arranged them into neat cubic structures containing pits into which crushed and burnt bones were cast.
    The site continued in this way until it was torn down by the romans around 30bc when a roman temple was erected, this was later expanded in the 1st and 2nd centuries CE becoming a major Gallo-Roman Temple complex of some fifty hectares in size complete with a theater and baths. The last evidence of activity on the site occured around 380bc, it is unknown why the site was abandoned but a combination of Germanic incursions (some of the site had previously been burned at the end of the third century CE) and the rise of Christianinty (Theodosious's prescriptions against paganism started around this time too) are seen as the most likely reasons.
    800 dead is a truly monumental battle? Alexander would have laughed at that.

    The monument still is a great example.
    Balloon-Count: x 15


    Many thanks to Hooahguy for this great sig.

  3. #33
    The Count of Bohemia Senior Member Cecil XIX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Neo-Richmond
    Posts
    2,429

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by SwissBarbar View Post
    800 dead is a truly monumental battle? Alexander would have laughed at that.
    "Every battle is momentous to someone."

  4. #34
    urk! Member bobbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tin Isles
    Posts
    3,666

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by SwissBarbar View Post
    800 dead is a truly monumental battle? Alexander would have laughed at that.
    Yes but he was the leader of a large army fighting battles againts the biggest empire in the world, its not really comparable to two small tribes fighting over territory.

    800 dead is actually quite high by the way, going by the average ratio of deaths in a battle you could expect to see 10 times that number wounded so the number of participants would certainly have been well over 10000.


  5. #35
    Member Member Cartaphilus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Baliar Maior
    Posts
    268

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    What about the "Toros de Guisando" (bulls of Guisando) in Avila?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulls_of_Guisando

    "Iustitia procurat pacem et iniuria bellum, humilia verba sunt nuntii pacis et superba, belli." (Ramon Llull)

  6. #36
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Cartaphilus, I like that. Do you have any information besides wikipedia?
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  7. #37
    EB on ALX player Member ziegenpeter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    COLONIA CLAVDIA ARA AGRIPPINENSIVM
    Posts
    737

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    What about the Externsteine in Germany?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externsteine

    "A wise man once said: Never buy a game full price!"
    - Another wise man

  8. #38
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Can you do better than a wikipedia link? Mock up a little descriptive paragraph?
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  9. #39
    Member Member burn_again's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by ziegenpeter View Post
    What about the Externsteine in Germany?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externsteine
    ...

    Quote Originally Posted by burn_again View Post
    I was going to propose the Externsteine when I saw they were not on the list, but after some research I have doubts if they should be included at all.
    It seems that the idea of the Externsteine being a germanic sanctuary was brought up by national-romantic historians in the 19. century and then widely popularized in the 1920s and 1930s. Especially the Nazis tried to see a "germanic Stonehenge" in the Externsteine. Archaeological evidence however does not support this point of view. Apart from some paleolithic and mesolithic findings, the first evidence for a human presence there comes from the early middle ages. There is no evidence to suggest that the Externsteine were of any religious importance to the locals in the Neolithicum, the Bronze Age, the Iron Age and EBs time frame. While people could have known them as a landmark, nothing implies that they were religious center of the germanic people.

    Here is a link to a review (in english) of a book by archaeologist Uta Halle, who has examined the excavations done at the Externsteine in the 1930s and has come to the conclusion that the still popular view of the Externsteine as a germanic sanctuary is just a nationalist fantasy:
    http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=11176

  10. #40
    Member Member Hax's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    5,245

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    There are numerous Buddhist stupas and temples in the area of Gandhara dating from before 200 BC. Let's see what I can find out and I'll post them here.

    All in all, Gandhara was a major region in Buddhism; it migrated to China and Tibet from there, and Kukai, a Japanese Buddhist monk was educated by a Gandharan, if I recall correctly (although that was way after the EB timeframe ;))
    Last edited by Hax; 12-11-2009 at 13:05.
    This space intentionally left blank.

  11. #41
    Member Member Hax's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    5,245

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Proposal: The Mohenjo Daro
    Region: Sind
    Description:

    Mohenjo Daro literally means "Mound of the Dead", in Sanskrit. Apparently, it was one of the largest cities of the Indus Valley Civilisation, having over more than 35,000 inhabitants at some point. The greatness of the city was also shown by the fact that most houses contained bathrooms, and the upper class houses had interior courtyards. As opposed to the later Mauryan Emperors, the inhabitants of Mohenjo Daro used very little stone in its construction; most houses were created with timber and mud brick, as was also common in Mesapotamia. There have also been excavations of a huge bathhouse, 12 by 7 metres, which was later found out to be a heated bath. Apart from that, there was also found a "granary"(though it's unknown whether it truly was a granary), an assembly hall, a college building or university. There is also evidence to support that people had been engaged in crafting ivory and copper tools, terracotta pottery, glazed ornaments and steatite beads.

    The city of Mohenjo Daro was abandoned around 1900 BC, but interestingly enough, there is some evidence to suggest there were later repopulations; as suggested by the evidence of Buddhist monasteries and a stupa within the citadel. This Buddhist stupa actually dates from the second century AD, I've found, which is past EB's timeframe. However, it is interesting to note that the construction of a stupa, which is an important building in Buddhism, was created, and it suggests that by the second century AD, there had been a sizeable Buddhist population.

    All in all, Mohenjo Daro is a great example of Iron Age life in the Indus Valley; the presence of jewelry, divided classes, specialized crafts, criminality and a huge population clearly shows that the area of Gandara knows an ancient urban history.

    Map of the citadel
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Bath and granary area
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Lower Town area, Kushan Stupa in background
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    The great bath
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Well
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    The skeleton room; 14 skeletons were found here, believed to be the remnants of a mass murder.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Sources:
    Wikipedia.org
    Mohenjo Daro.com (created by Dr. John M. Kenoyer, a professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin, 2005)
    Mohenjo Daro (created by the University of Minnesota, 1999)

    ================================================== ========================
    This space intentionally left blank.

  12. #42
    Member Member penguinking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I propose The Necropolises of Tarquinia as a potential wonder. These tombs, built by the Etruscans from the 6th to the 5th centuries BC, are the largest ancient necropolis in the Mediterranean. Over 6,000 tombs are located in Tarquinia, some of which boast beautiful wall paintings. Over 1,000 more tombs are located in Cerveti, a city very close to Tarquinia.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    One of the most famous tombs is the Tomb of Hunting and Fishing, made around 520 BC.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Completed campaigns:
    Vanilla Carthage
    BI Sassanids
    EB 1.1 Casse

    "I don't intend for this to take on a political tone. I'm just here for the drugs."
    -Nancy Reagan at an anti-drug rally.

  13. #43
    Member Member HFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Carnac

    Damn them frenchies!!

    It sent shivers up me spine when I saw it fifteen years ago and I still remember it.....and at my age that's saying something! :)

    some reference stuff here

    http://www.megalithia.com/brittany/carnac/index.html

    with other megalithia source stuff that may/may not be of use.

    This looks good for Ireland

    http://www.megalithia.com/newgrange/index.html

    and this map may be of interest

    http://www.megalithia.com/introgmap.html

    but its only the UK but there may be other wider examples of this.


    My vote still goes for the Great Dam of the Saba'a.....which is already listed.


    All the best....and looking forward to the fruits of your labours.

  14. #44
    Member Member SolAurum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Maybe these were mentioned... but as I haven't seen them...

    Ireland seems sorely neglected by the suggestions here. I propose Knowth or Meath as a possible wonder. Just wikipedia it :)

  15. #45
    EB on ALX player Member ziegenpeter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    COLONIA CLAVDIA ARA AGRIPPINENSIVM
    Posts
    737

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Hello fellow EB-fans!
    I got a suggestion for germania:
    Opfermoor von Niederdorla (lit: Marches of sacrifice, Niederdorla)
    Unfortunatly, I don't have the time/skills to translate the textes, so I provide the links I got, hoping someone could help out:
    http://www.opfermoor.de/
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opfermoor_Niederdorla

    "A wise man once said: Never buy a game full price!"
    - Another wise man

  16. #46
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by SolAurum View Post
    Maybe these were mentioned... but as I haven't seen them...

    Ireland seems sorely neglected by the suggestions here. I propose Knowth or Meath as a possible wonder. Just wikipedia it :)
    Uh, can't do any better than that?

    This is not the kind of suggestion that I was hoping for. Not only did SolAurum not bother to develop the idea or make a short presentation, he also didn't specify much: Meath is a large county in Ireland and contains many sites of historical interest. If by 'Knowth', he really means the Brú na Bóinne complex, which includes the passage graves of Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth, then we'd have to look at some evidence for what the state of these sites was in 3rd to 1st centuries BCE: in case you didn't know it, SolAurum, these sites were already at least 3,000 years old by the time of EB. Newgrange, as it stands today (only an hours drive from my family's farm, by the way), is a reconstruction: in EBs time all the graves were likely just grassy mounds.

    Having said that, the Boyne Valley area as well as the soi-disant "Royal" sites of Ireland are all excellent material for wonders, if anyone would care to do a little real research.


    Mohenjo Daro, the Etruscan Necropolises, and the Ziggurat of Ur (from the TWC thread) are all good suggestions and will be considered.
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  17. #47
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Ziegenpeter, ich glaube das das Opfermoor ist schon drin, aber ich schaue nach.
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  18. #48
    EB on ALX player Member ziegenpeter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    COLONIA CLAVDIA ARA AGRIPPINENSIVM
    Posts
    737

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Ah nice! Didn't know you are german too.
    I don't know how many wonders you are going to implement per region...
    One major problem of germania is that there are some sites wich were surely central in cultural life, but we don't have findings (AFAIK) and few sources and/or sources only for later times. Druidenstein of Altenkrichen(supposed to be a Thingplace of the Chatti),Struckberg, maybe Blocksberg and Heligoland(holy place of the Frisians to the god Foseti in later times) e.g.

    "A wise man once said: Never buy a game full price!"
    - Another wise man

  19. #49
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    First off, ich bin gar nicht Deutsch. Mann braucht nicht Deutsch sein um Deutschsprachig zu werden.

    Second, there's no real limit as such, either in how many total wonders or how many per province: of course, the amount of work required is always a limiting factor. But with the Province Buildings new to EB2, there is opportunity to highlight much more of the unique character of each region.
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  20. #50
    Member Member NikosMaximilian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Proposed Wonder: The Incense Route



    "The Incense trade route or the Incense Road of Antiquity comprised a network of major ancient trading routes linking the Mediterranean world with Eastern sources of incense (and spices), stretching from Mediterranean ports across the Levant and Egypt through Arabia to India. The incense trade flourished from South Arabia to the Mediterranean between roughly the 3rd century BCE to the 2nd century CE.[1] The Incense Route served as a channel for trading of goods such as Arabian frankincense and myrrh;[1] Indian spices, ebony, silk and fine textiles;[2] and East African rare woods, feathers, animal skins and gold.[2]"
    I think it would be good to add some extra lure to those regions in Africa. Even with all the current wonders and fertilty, I believe it doesn't truly represent the amount of trade the region had, specially the naval trading routes to India.

    Proposed Wonder: Curonian Spit (Kuršių Nerija)





    "Human habitation of this elongated sand dune peninsula, 98 km long and 0.4-4 km wide, dates back to prehistoric times. Throughout this period it has been threatened by the natural forces of wind and waves. Its survival to the present day has been made possible only as a result of ceaseless human efforts to combat the erosion of the Spit, dramatically illustrated by continuing stabilisation and reforestation projects.

    According to Baltic mythology, the Curonian Spit was formed by a giantess, Neringa, who was playing on the seashore. This child also appears in other myths (in some of which she is shown as a young strong woman, similar to a female version of the Greek Heracles).

    The Curonian Spit was formed about 5,000 years ago. From ca. 800 to 1016, it was the location of Kaup, a major pagan trading centre which has not been excavated yet
    Increase in tradable goods? A bit more of luring players towards the Baltic.
    5% happiness bonus?

    Proposed Wonder: Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak







    "The tomb is part of a large Thracian necropolis. It comprises a narrow corridor and a round burial chamber, both decorated with murals representing a Thracian couple at a ritual funeral feast. The monument dates back to the 4th century BC and has been on the UNESCO protected World Heritage Site list since 1979. The murals are memorable for the splendid horses and especially for the gesture of farewell, in which the seated couple grasp each other's wrists in a moment of tenderness and equality. The paintings are Bulgaria's best-preserved artistic masterpieces from the Hellenistic period.

    Discovered in 1944, it is located near Seutopolis, the capital city of the Thracian king Seutes III. The tholos has a narrow corridor and a round burial chamber, both decorated with murals representing Thracian burial rituals and culture. These paintings are Bulgaria’s best-preserved artistic masterpieces from the Hellenistic period.
    Hapiness bonus?

    In the same mould, it could be used the Thracian Tomb of Sveshtari
    Last edited by Ludens; 12-15-2009 at 20:21. Reason: merged posts

    Completed campaigns:


    Ongoing campaigns:

  21. #51
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Nikos, that's an excellent start. Any more information about any of those would be great!


    Just a note to myself- Oenach Tailten. Info to come.
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  22. #52
    Member Member moonburn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    963

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    the palace of knossos seems a great wonder

    maybe someone in crete after visiting the palace could get some quality as a "spacial organiser" since after visiting the "labirinth" they would compreend how to better use space ? plus 1+ influence for being the "guardian" of the athenian/greek superiority against the animalities of the minoans ? or descendent of theseus

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knossos

    The site has had a very long history of human habitation, beginning with the founding of the first Neolithic settlement circa 7000 BC. Over time and during several different phases that had their own social dynamic, Knossos grew until, by the 19th to 16th centuries BC (during the 'Old Palace' and the succeeding 'Neo-palatial' periods), the settlement possessed not only a monumental administrative and religious center (i.e., the Palace), but also a surrounding population of 5000-8000 people.

    The palace is about 130 meters on a side and since the Roman period has been suggested as the source of the myth of the Labyrinth, an elaborate mazelike structure constructed for King Minos of Crete and designed by the legendary artificer Daedalus to hold the Minotaur, a creature that was half man and half bull and was eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus.

    The 6 acres (24,000 m2) of the palace included a theatre, a main entrance on each of its four cardinal faces, and extensive storerooms (also called magazines). The storerooms contained pithoi (large clay vases) that held oil, grains, dried fish, beans, and olives. Many of the items were created at the palace itself, which had grain mills, oil presses, and wine presses. Beneath the pithoi were stone holes used to store more valuable objects, such as gold. The palace used advanced architectural techniques: for example, part of it was built up to five stories high.

    Liquid management
    The palace had at least three separate liquid management systems, one for supply, one for drainage of runoff, and one for drainage of waste water.

    Aqueducts brought fresh water to Kephala hill from springs at Archanes, about 10 km away. Springs there are the source of the Kairatos river, in the valley of which Kephala is located. The aqueduct branched to the palace and to the town. Water was distributed at the palace by gravity feed through terracotta pipes to fountains and spigots. The pipes were tapered at one end to make a pressure fit, with rope for sealing. The water supply system would have been manifestly easy to attack.[citation needed] No hidden springs have been discovered as at Mycenae.

    Sanitation drainage was through a closed system leading to a sewer apart from the hill. The Queen's Megaron contained an example of the first water flushing system toilet adjoining the bathroom. This toilet was a seat over a drain flushed by pouring water from a jug. The bathtub located in the adjoining bathroom similarly had to be filled by someone heating, carrying, and pouring water, and must have been drained by overturning into a floor drain or by bailing. This toilet and bathtub were exceptional structures within the 1300-room complex.

    just my 2 cents and hope this helps

  23. #53
    The Rhetorician Member Demetrius Scholarius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Antioch
    Posts
    2,258

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I've got one, for the province that includes nowadays Netherlands, it's called Terpen or Artificial dwelling hill
    An artificial dwelling hill (known as Terp, Wierde, Woerd, Warf, Warft, Werf, Wurt and Værft) is a mound, created to provide safe ground during high tide and river floods. These hills occur in the coastal parts of the Netherlands (in the provinces of Zeeland, Friesland and Groningen), in southern part of Denmark and in Germany where, before dikes were made, tides interfered with daily life. They also occur in the Rhine and Meuse river plains in the central part of the Netherlands.
    In the Dutch province of Friesland, an artificial dwelling hill is called terp (plural terpen). Terp means "village" in Old Frisian and is cognate with English thorp, Danish torp, German Dorf and Dutch dorp. The better word for these mounds would therefore be wierde or Wurt, but terp has become the predominant term.
    Historical Frisian settlements were built on artificial terpen up to 15 m height to be safe from the floods in periods of rising sea levels. The first terp-building period dates from 500 BC, the second from 200 BC to 50 BC. In the mid 3rd century, the rise of sea level was so dramatic that the clay district was deserted, and settlers returned only around AD 400. A third terp-building period dates from AD 700 (Old Frisian times). This ended with the coming of the dike somewhere around 1200. During the 18th and 19th centuries, many terps were destroyed to use the fertile soil they contained to fertilize farm fields. Terpen were usually well fertilized by the decay of the rubbish and personal waste deposited by their inhabitants during centuries.
    A certain Roman history writer wrote about it in awe, but I forgot his name, it was build not to drown, but a 'wonder' nonetheless.
    Picture isn't really good, I know
    Last edited by Demetrius Scholarius; 12-18-2009 at 10:55.
    "When the candles are out all women are fair."
    -Plutarch, Coniugia Praecepta 46

  24. #54
    Member Member Vulgaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Being a Belgian (and still hoping that there will be some solid Belgae action in EB II), I’d thought I’d help by searching for some ancient ‘wonders’ in and around present day Belgium. I didn’t find any great monuments (yet), just the odd megalith or prehistoric settlement. So I decided to try another approach: looking for interesting natural features.


    Arduenna Silva
    Arduenna Silva, the “wooded heights” (Arduenna derives from the Gaulish arduo- meaning height) a vast forest in Roman times, that stretched from the Sambre river in Belgium to the Rhine in Germany. The forest was named after a pagan goddess Arduinna. The modern Ardennes covers a much smaller area.
    In Celtic mythology, Arduinna (also Arduina, Arduinnae or Arduinne) was the eponymous goddess of the Ardennes Forest and region, represented as a huntress riding a boar (primarily in the present-day regions of Belgium and Luxembourg). Her cult originated in what is today known as Ardennes, a region of Belgium, Luxembourg and France. She was later assimilated into the Gallo-Roman mythology of goddess Diana. Some depictions of Arduinna show her riding a boar.

    (Perhaps a ‘cult of Diana’ could give either an economical bonus because of the hunting of animals; or a bonus to ranged troops trained in the region?)


    Silva Carbonaria
    Silva Carbonaria, the "charcoal forest", was the dense old-growth forest of beech and oak that formed a natural boundary during the Late Iron Age through Roman times into the Early Middle Ages across what is now Belgium. The forest naturally thinned out in the open sandy stretches to the north and formed a barrier—trackless to the outsider—on the heavier soils to the south. Yet further to the south, the higher elevation and deep river valleys were covered by the even less penetrable ancient Arduenna Silva, the deeply folded Ardennes, which are still forested to this day. The Silva Carbonaria was a vast forest that stretched from the rivers Senne and the Dijle in the north to the Sambre in the south. To the east Silva Carbonaria extended to the Rhine.
    The charcoal—which gave the forest its name and into which the once seeming inexhaustible woods were slowly converted—was required to fuel the scattered smelting furnaces that forged the plentiful iron found in outcroppings laid bare by riverside erosion. Even before the Romans arrived, iron weapons forged in the Silva Carbonaria were traded by the Belgae to their cousins in the southeast of Britain.

    (Perhaps this forest could give an economical bonus?)


    Pierre de Brunehaut
    The Pierre de Brunehaut (Stone of Brunhilda) is the largest menhir of Belgium. It is situated in Hollain, a village in the province of Hainaut. It measures 3 metres by 4.4 metres in height.

    It is supposed to be erected around 2500 BC (according to wikipedia). It had started to topple in the 18th century, but the locals re-erected it.
    I know there are many more spectacular Stone age monuments to be found, but this one quite struck me because of it’s strange shape.

    I'm sorry, but since it's my first post, I'm apparently not allowed to post links to images and other sites containing information about these sites yet, but if someone's interested, I would gladly help by gathering pictures or information.
    ==>Information is gathered from wikipedia

    Hope this helps :)

  25. #55
    Speaker of Truth Moderator Moros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    12,531

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Quote Originally Posted by NikosMaximilian View Post
    Proposed Wonder: The Incense Route





    I think it would be good to add some extra lure to those regions in Africa. Even with all the current wonders and fertilty, I believe it doesn't truly represent the amount of trade the region had, specially the naval trading routes to India.
    Don't worry as this one is already planned to be more than just a wonder.

  26. #56
    EB Nitpicker Member oudysseos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    3,187

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Good to see some action here over the hols. I will update the suggestions post and I have a couple of my own I have been working on.
    οἵη περ φύλλων γενεὴ τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν.
    Even as are the generations of leaves, such are the lives of men.
    Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, Illiad, 6.146



  27. #57
    Member Member Vulgaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project



    Dunno if this helps; but I was bored today, and so put the locations of the wonders of the EB I-list on this map. Not all of them are in their exact locations, but I thought it would give a nice view over which regions already have their wonders documented, and for which regions there aren't any (yet).

    Couldn’t locate:
    -Limios Alsos (The Sacred Grove)
    -Mōristaigōnez (Marshland Footbridges)
    -Garamante Royal Cemetry
    -HaHar HaQados (The Sacred Mountain)
    -Heliopolis (in Asia?)
    -Dharmaraja Thupa (Stupa of the King of the Dharma)
    -Siva Mandir (Indian Temple of Siva)
    -Sauromatae I Khashaya Nygad Kuybyrtae (Sarmatian Royal Tombs)
    -Skuda I Khashaya Nygad Kuybyrtae (Skythian Royal Tombs)

    -NOTE: Wikipedia names Callanish with 2 l’s, don’t know if you wrote it with just one on purpose or not
    -NOTE: I didn’t draw Lines for important trade routes, because I think it would make the map a bit messy
    -NOTE: For the Kogaionon, I (I did the best I could) took the location of Sarmigetuza
    -NOTE: For the Nerthouz Agwijōn Wīhā I took the island of Zealand

    P.S.: Sorry if the map is way too big, it just was one of the first maps I found, and it seemed ok :)

  28. #58
    Member Member Macilrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Aarhus, Denmark
    Posts
    1,591

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Yes I was a bit puzzled at the Sjælland location. It may be apt though there are a few anceint power centres and holy places there we know off from Iron Age. Tissø (Tyr's Lake) springs to mind.

    It has votive offerings from all Iron Age and into the Viking Age, as Christianity takes over, the offerings disappear. However, the manor from the Viking Age next to it still continue to develop up to the 13th century in various forms, and I cannot recall, but am almost certain that it is a continuation of one from the Iron Age nearby.

    However, Denmark does not have any wonders as such from EB time frame that we know of with certainty. Some of the Stone Age mounds/cairns might qualify, but in my best estimation does not.
    'For months Augustus let hair and beard grow and occasionally banged his head against the walls whilst shouting; "Quinctillius Varus, give me my legions back"' -Sueton, Augustus.

    "Deliver us oh God, from the fury of the Norsemen", French prayer, 9th century.
    Ask gi'r klask! ask-vikingekampgruppe.dk

    Balloon count: 13

  29. #59
    Member Member Genava's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Geneva
    Posts
    89

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    I have a suggestion, I choice the Thermopylae because in EB1 the battlefield is too large.

    The Thermopylae:


    More than a simple strategic pass, the Thermopylae are a sanctuary. The most important amphictyony was based in the Thermopylae, near the temple of Demeter.


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    In the Archaic period of ancient Greece, an amphictyony (Ancient Greek: ἀμφικτυονία), a "league of neighbors", or Amphictyonic League was an ancient association of Greek tribes formed in the dim past, before the rise of the Greek polis.

    Based on legend, the Great Amphictyonic League was founded somewhat after the Trojan War, for the protection and administration of the temple of Apollo in Delphi and temple of Demeter in Anthele (Ἀνθήλη), near Thermopylae. The founding myth claimed that it had been founded in the most distant past by an eponymous founder Amphictyon, brother of Hellen, the common ancestor of all Hellenes. Representatives of the twelve members met in Thermopylae in spring and in Delphi in autumn.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amphictyonic_League


    The Thermopylae today:


    A modification (found on the web) to show the pass during classical age:

  30. #60
    iudex thervingiorum Member athanaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Lusitania
    Posts
    1,085

    Default Re: The Europa Barbarorum Wonders Project

    Good idea, Vulgaris
    Quote Originally Posted by Vulgaris View Post
    -NOTE: For the Nerthouz Agwijōn Wīhā I took the island of Zealand
    AFAIK it should be on Rügen (in modern Germany), which is southeast of Zealand.



    Some of the Stone Age mounds/cairns might qualify, but in my best estimation does not.
    Yeah, all those I've come across seem to have been dug up only fairly recently.
    Last edited by athanaric; 12-28-2009 at 14:39.




    Swêboz guide for EB 1.2
    Tips and Tricks for New Players
    from Hannibal Khan the Great, Brennus, Tellos Athenaios, and Winsington III.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •