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gamegeek2
02-20-2012, 22:28
Greetings, Europa Barbarorum fans.

Today, we of the Novus Ordo Mundi team are proud to present to you the seventh preview of our late game mod.

The Lugiones and West Balts

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--- Introduction ---

The lands east of the Rhine and north of the Danube, known to the Romans simply as Germania, have a lot more to them than simple, fairly homogenous 'barbarians' as many would often like to think. The variance among these peoples goes a lot deeper than simple dialectal and cultural differences, and while true they do have much in common, there is much more to them than we are often led to think.

Today's preview takes us to the lands east of the Oder/Widura, but west of the lands now known to us as Russia. During the late pRIA (pre-Roman Iron Age) and RIA (Roman Iron Age) these lands were dominated by people who spoke languages known to linguists as West Baltic tongues.


The People and their History

During the 3rd century BC, the Pomeranian culture had given way to the Przeworsk and Oksywie cultures, which were distinguished by extensive adoption of La Tene ironworking techniques. Given their geographic coincidence, the Lugiones are associated with the Przeworsk, and their rise and fall can be correlated with that of the Przeworsk as well.

The Celtic features of the Lugiones seem to have come from contact with Noric/Eastern Celts, such as the Boii. In particular, there was a great deal of overlap between the Przeworsk and the Cotini, a prosperous Celtic group who occupied the area around what is today Slovakia, including several iron-rich mines. These in turn were in extensive contact with the Dacians during the later years of the pRIA, and there was a good deal of overlap between the three. This can be particlarly seen by the spread of the single-edged straightsword, which from its origins along the Oder came into use among the Eastern Celts and Dacians.

The Lugiones were a confederacy of largely West Baltic tribes (some Eastern Celts were likely among them), located in the historical district of Silesia, as well as around the upper Vistula. Among their member-tribes were the Naharvali, Diduni, Arii, Omani, Buri, and Calisii (likely the inhabitants of the settlement of Kalisia).

Up until the Cimbric migrations, the Lugiones were the most powerful non-Celtic group present in Greater Germania. The Cimbric migration event rocked the established order in the region by devastating the Eastern Celtic oppida-culture that had been dominant in the region for centuries. In particular, the Boii were hard hit, and while they survived the migration intact, their area had been severely depopulated and many of their oppida were destroyed. Seizing upon this, the Suebian confederacy (particularly the Marcomanni) expanded to the south, into the area now known as Saxony, and even into parts of modern Bavaria (former lands of the Boii). The Lugiones would ally with Rome against them, but it was to little avail.

Hence, around 80 BC the Lugiones were at something of an inflection point - still powerful, and not as weakened as many of the Eastern Celts, but threatened by their powerful West Germanic neighbors and the migrating East Germanics in Pomerania. By the 1st century AD, the Lugians were of an increasingly East Germanic character, with the people who would eventually be known as the Vandals being incorporated into their confederacy. Despite this, they were still the master ironworkers of Germania, and produced fine long swords and even fielded heavy cavalry (as indicated by the fine, long cavalry swords they produced, and perhaps by the importance of horse-gear in warrior burials). It would be from this ethnos that the fearsome East Germanic horsemen of the migration period emerged.


Warriors of the Lugiones, West Balts, and East Germanics

Infantry


Jugunşiz (Germanic Skirmishers) - "Youth"

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Not yet "proven" in battle, these young men, aspiring to be full members of the tribe, seek glory and recognition from their kin in the thick of battle. As of yet untested by the hell of close combat, they are screening and picketing duties, and are equipped appropriately for the job. They would be the first ones to initiate the fight, by letting fly the first missiles to probe the enemy line for weaknesses and create a gap where the war-band might punch through.

In addition to their battlefield roles, such light infantry are invaluable raiders, their light equipment making it easy to raid the herds and farms of their enemies. No doubt this would be something that would prove their worth just as well, as bringing home an enemy's sheep would be infinitely more valuable to the tribe than an enemy's head.

NOTE: Given the almost identical function and equipment of the West Baltic and Germanic skirmishers, we have decided to incorporate them into the same unit.


Karai (West Baltic Common Levy) - "Warriors"

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Among the West Balts, a strong tradition exists of constant warfare, one that has thrived for some time in among the Lugians and has only grown more since the Cimbric migration. Every able-bodied, fully fledged member of the tribe is expected to stand in the battle-line. Lacking in any protection besides the shield-wall they form into, these men rely on those standing beside them to see them through the day, as all fight so that they may preserve their kith, kin, and kine.

As the West Baltic lands are at this time the leading production centers of iron, most men in the levy have a few iron-tipped frameae, but fashioned with the wide La Tene spearheads that would spell certain doom for anyone unlucky enough to receive a wound from them. They unleash a storm of such weapons before closing in for the bloody melee with heavy spears and a fierce charge.

Unlike the retainers, the Common Levy was not bound by ritual oath to stand and fight to the death, and might thus take to their heels should the gods' favor not be with them that day. Yet with the increasingly warlike climate following the Cimbric migration and subsequent Germanic expansionism, the contests such troops took part in became less and less like the ritualized warfare of tradition and more a brutal struggle for survival. Such men became more resolute and proficient warriors, who would put up a bitter fight to the last.


Werpanez (Germanic Slingers)

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Those not deemed full-fledged members of a tribe in Germania are typically not allowed to carry a spear or similar armament. That said, they are still made to serve in the defense of the tribe, an opportunity for such men to prove themselves worthy. Hence, these men go to war as slingers and archers, with nothing but a hunting knife for self-defense should the enemy manage to close with these men.

These particular men head to battle with a sling and a good number of stones. While not regarded very highly by their comrades, they do what they do well, and can pick off a number of men at a good distance. Their attacks ignore armor, making them highly valuable again well-armored troops of the Celts and Romans, but they are not as accurate nor as damaging as archers.

NOTE: Given the almost identical function and equipment of the West Baltic and Germanic slingers, we have decided to incorporate them into the same unit.


Skeutjonez (Germanic Archers)

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Those not deemed full-fledged members of a tribe in Germania are typically not allowed to carry a spear or similar armament. That said, they are still made to serve in the defense of the tribe, an opportunity for such men to prove themselves worthy. Hence, these men go to war as slingers and archers, with nothing but a hunting knife for self-defense should the enemy manage to close with these men.

These particular men head to battle with a long bow and a good number of arrows. While not regarded very highly by their comrades, they do what they do well, and can pick off a number of men at a good distance, though their arrows aren't quite as damaging as javelins. That said, they are not very effective against well-armored units, and shouldn't waste their ammunition against such troops.

NOTE: Given the almost identical function and equipment of the West Baltic and Germanic archers, we have decided to incorporate them into the same unit.


Tautāginai (West Baltic Retainer Infantry) - "Defenders of the Tribe"

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In the dark forests of Germania, a man's worth is measured not by the size of his war-chest, but the size of his war-band, the group of loyal followers sworn to protect him, in return for ale, plunder, and fame. Fierce and hardy men, they live by the fruits of their weapons, the javelin and the spear. With these they unleash a terrible hail of death and close in for a brutal contest at close quarters.

For these fine fighters, there is little to look forward to but the song and glory of war, though they may yet rise along with their chief. They eagerly follow their headman into the breach, for it is a dishonor to not match his valor in battle, as much as it is for him to not be the most valorous of them all. Lest their lord-friend be taken, spear-tip and iron, they fight to the last, and will fall in the line gladly should the same happen to him, for there is no greater disgrace than to survive the chief in battle.


Xeruneutōz (Germanic Retainer Swordsmen)

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In the dark forests of Germania, a man's worth is measured not by the size of his war-chest, but the size of his war-band, the group of loyal followers sworn to protect him, in return for ale, plunder, and fame. The more successful and/or wealthier warbands typically have a good number of swordsmen among their ranks. While not as valuable against cavalry or as effective in a shieldwall, swordsmen have an advantage in the swirling melee that many battles devolve into, and as such are a valuable asset for any army.

For these fine fighters, there is little to look forward to but the song and glory of war, though they may yet rise along with their chief. They eagerly follow their headman into the breach, for it is a dishonor to not match his valor in battle, as much as it is for him to not be the most valorous of them all. Lest their lord-friend be taken, spear-tip and iron, they fight to the last, and will fall in the line gladly should the same happen to him, for there is no greater disgrace than to survive the chief in battle.

NOTE: Given the almost identical function and equipment of the West Baltic and Germanic swordsmen, we have decided to incorporate them into the same unit.


Xağuberanez (Germanic Clubmen) - "Battle-Bears"

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Among the many weapons wielded by the warriors of Germania, none are more primitive or simply brutal as the club. While one might now laugh at the choice to wield such a weapon in an age when iron tools of war are becoming increasingly common, the speed, strength, and technique with which these men wield their weapons makes one forget how simple they truly are!

The choice to wield a club goes beyond practical reasons - it's also an expression of the religious affiliation of these men. The great thunder-gods of contemporary Germanic and Baltic peoples - Şunraz and Perkwūnas - both wielded clubs as their weapons of choice. Hence, these clubmen may have been part of the cult of the thunder-god, and sought to imitate their deity in battle.

Typically, they form in a wedge formation, designed to break a hole in the enemy line with a powerful charge. This is aided by the fact that their heavy clubs give momentum to their charge, and they are naturally powerful and strong men - a good strike would break an enemy's shield, break several bones, or crush his skull. This and their bearskin cloaks give them a fierce reputation and appearance, which helps carry the enemy before them.

NOTE: Since the club troops of the Lugiones and Sweboz equipped themselves in a similar manner with identical weapons, we have decided to combine them into one unit.


Kirsninkai (Harii "Blackened" Warriors)

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Darkness falls. The camp is made, dinner has been had, and the men begin to snuff out their candles so that they might go to sleep. You hear the faintest rustle of leaves, but assure yourself that it is nothing more than a deer. Suddenly, you hear a gasp, and a body slumps to the ground. You rush outside, to see what has happened, fearing the guard has choked on a piece of the meat. But no - he is lying on the ground, blood spilling from his throat. As if this were a living nightmare, two demonic beings stalk the ground in front of you, their shields the color of their painted bodies, a hungry look in their eyes. You draw your sword, but it is too late - a spear thrust has found its mark. As you fall to the ground, you look into his eyes, the only thing you can see against the night around you. "Labanaktis" he says, as he thrusts downward into your neck.

These are the Harii, the most feared among all warriors in Germania. They fight with shield and body painted black, but aside from this their equipment does not differ much from typical Germanic warriors. They forgo the use of the javelin in favor of a single-edged shortsword, an ideal weapon with which to finish an enemy at close quarters in the night. With this and their skill with the spear, they make sure that few, if any, live to tell of the time they lived out their nightmares.


Isernabanğō (Germanic Elite Infantry)

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Few are the Germanic and Baltic warlords who can claim the sort of wealth or success required to equip their retainers with mail, or attract men with such equipment into the heireğaz. Such men would very likely be among the leaders of large tribes such as the Mergomannez, Heruskōz, or Burai. Because if anything is true about the world of the West Germanics and Balts, it is that might is right - regardless of the cunning of the man, he must have a loyal band of armed followers if he is to achieve great power and status in a world marked by continuous conflict.

These are the finest footmen to be found in the North. Like the vast majority of their comrades, the fight in the shield-wall as elite line troops, but carry swords as a weapon should their spear break, or the fight degenerate into an unorganized frenzy. It is in such a situation that they truly excel, able to carry the day against great odds with superior panoply and determination.

NOTE: Since the elite troops of the Lugiones and Sweboz equipped themselves in a similar manner with identical weapons, we have decided to combine them into one unit.


Cavalry

Kamnitninkai (West Baltic Retainer Cavalry)

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Since times long forgotten, the West Balts have kept small herds of horses on the plains of the Vistula, Narew, and Bug, as aids in herding, but also as steeds for battle. Since times long forgotten, horsemen have played but a secondary role in the warfare of the region - serving as scouts and clearing out enemy pickets, but not playing a decisive role in battle.

Since the Scythian incursion of the 5th century BC, however, the quality of the regions' steeds has steadily improved, as well-bred mounts from the steppes have been acquired over time as part of the amber trade and contact with nomadic groups to the east. Archaeology also indicates an increase in the importance of cavalry during the Przeworsk period, as equestrian equipment, including long swords, shows up increasingly in burials.

These men, however, do not wield long Celtic-influenced swords, but rather the single-edged swords more common in the region. Such weapons are cheaper to make, and nearly as effective in combat, very capable of carving a nasty gash in any opponent. And though their sword and horse are their marks of pride, it is their fearsome spears that make these men highly effective horsemen. The broad head showing clear Celtic influence, a successful hit from such a weapon is nearly a guaranteed kill. For protection, these men wear leather helmets and cuirasses and carry large bossed shields - more clear signs of La Tene culture.

While far from heavy cavalry, they pack a far more fearsome charge and follow-up than the light horse characteristic of their West Germanic neighbors. These lesser nobles and their retainers are not the heavy horsemen that the wealthier nobles and their companions are, and should not be used as such. Their task is not to break the enemy line, but to sweep aside light troops, put those to flight, and turn on the weakest points of an enemy's line - the flanks and rear.


Bruninkai (Lugian Heavy Cavalry)

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Born out of the ashes of the Pomeranian culture, the Przeworsk culture was one of two Baltic cultures that flourished during Roman Iron Age. With the introduction of Celtic ironworking techniques, metallurgy flourished, to the extent that the Przeworsk area could be called the "Armamentarium Europae Barbarorum."

Since the Scythian incursion of the 5th century BC, the quality of the regions' steeds had steadily improved, as well-bred mounts from the steppes were acquired over time through contact with the nomadic east. Archaeology also indicates an increase in the importance of cavalry during the Przeworsk period, as equestrian equipment, including long swords, shows up increasingly in burials. The wealth required to field such heavy horsemen can be attributed to the amber trade which passed through Lugian lands.

Despite advances in metallurgy, metal armour was still rare, reserved for those who imported it or won it in battle from Celts and Romans. With a long lance in one hand and a heavy shield in the other, these men bravely charge into battle, and slash their opponents to pieces with a long cavalry sword. It was from these men that the East Germanic cavalry tradition of later times would be born.


We hope you have enjoyed this preview of the Lugiones. Happy Easter to all!


https://i841.photobucket.com/albums/zz332/Jegwettnorskbaralit/artworksigBig2.jpg

Courtesy of Finn MacCumhaill. Though this guy isn't actually a Lugian :oops:

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Finn MacCumhail
03-14-2012, 14:17
A new look at Xağuberanez

https://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/cc518/ebnomfinn/modding/bearskin.png

Brave Brave Sir Robin
03-14-2012, 14:42
Wow the new clubman unit looks awesome!

Can't wait to play around with these units sometime soon:smash: