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Garvanko
11-02-2005, 17:07
A couple of strategic problems for all of you, just to get some opinions on my current Greek campaign.

Two scenario's. Both happening at the same time.

As you can see, I've succeeded in uniting the Greek cities while exterminating most of Macedon. Ive got Alliances with Thrace and Germania, trade rights with everyone else apart from Pontus and the Romans, both of whom I'm currently at war with.

Scenario A:

https://img313.imageshack.us/img313/433/greekcampaign9rd.th.jpg (https://img313.imageshack.us/my.php?image=greekcampaign9rd.jpg)

The Brutii are attacking Corinth. Ive got my Faction Heir behind the second reinforcing Brutii army, but have ran out of movement points. I need to relieve Corinth, but I don't think my forces are strong enough to deal with both stacks head on without heavy losses, especially as Corinth will not be able to offer reinforcements since they will be outside the Battle zone. I believe I found a solution, but I would like to hear your thoughts on this one..

Appollonia is also under attack from the Julii. Its full of peasants, the Julii has Hastati, Principes and Equites. My relief force is mainly Militia hoplites and a couple of Mercs. Should I give up Appollonia and retreat behind the stone walls at Thermon, especially considering there's a second Julii stack coming down from Salona, or should I fight the Julii at my beseiged western frontier?

Senario B:

https://img314.imageshack.us/img314/4052/greek26fq.th.jpg (https://img314.imageshack.us/my.php?image=greek26fq.jpg)

My General has defended this bridge against Pontus for the past ten years. Should I move in on Sardis? Bear in mind Egypt is a growing power in the East, and is Allied with Pontus and Armenia.

Im playing on Vh/H

Dutch_guy
11-02-2005, 18:00
Scenario A :

here is what I would suggest :
Destroy the Brutii with your faction leaders army, your army looks very good , and should be able to destroy the Brutii - with some command skill at least- without losing to much troops, relieving your city in the center of your empire is a must.

a hard one, mainly because their units are better class than yours, both in the field and in the city.
Eventhough ytout units are way ouclasses, you can win - with some luck involved mind you- let them take Appollonia and retreat to Thermon, when they besiege Thermon, put all your hoplites at the town square, so you won't have to deal with the routers.
Head on , you can inflict heavy losses on both Hastati and Principes, that is were your chance lies.

Trying a field battle is a dangerous thing with these low tier troops, since they are prne to rout when loosing, even if it is by the smalles margin.

Scenario B:

Wait untill the full stack located directly east of your bridge attacks.
Defeat them and take Sardis, then try and blitz Sinope and hold the mountain pass leading to Tarsus, against the advancing - neutral-Egyptians.

That;s my advice on the matter

:balloon2:

Seamus Fermanagh
11-02-2005, 19:23
Scenario "A"

Part I:

Don't throw good troops after bad. Allow App' to hold on its own. Its just possible he'll siege rather than assault if you have enough #s on the peasants. Your relief force should -- if a general is present -- build a fort. Garrison it with mercs and a hoplite or two. Take the general and the better troops out and withdraw to Thermon. Hopefully the fort will buy more time/kill more Jollies and let you make Thermon a death trap for them.

Part II:

You're going to have to kill some Brutes -- and blood cost must be paid. If you lose Corinth, your forces are split and the Brutes have interior lines -- most annoying. Perhaps you can get in the red zone and force one of them to attack you? Nothing like spears that he has to come at to win after all. But even if you lose half you force destroying his two, it will be worth it strategically.

Scenario "B"

Option I:

What's between you and Sardis? If you must lose lots of troops killing the Brutes in "A," perhaps a raid on Sardis can help fund your recovery? Then strip it and sell it back to the bridge-boys as a cease-fire offering. From there you can return to your bridge.

Option II:

If a raid is impracticable, stay on your bridge -- you'll defend that against anything short of a full stack of elephants and Cappadocians (and maybe them). Let Asia remain static (your defenses seem well placed) and focus on re-stabilizing home base.

SomeNick
11-02-2005, 20:00
I have been playing GC on normal unit scale and have been having a blast watching the Romans try and take Apollonia.

The Brutii gave up trying to take it after I blockaded them and have kept such a state after 20 years now.

I have a small army at Apollonia with 7 units of Hoplites and some support that have been holding off thousands of Roman troops with occasional reinforcment for the Armoured Hoplites from Thermon.

I know it is a bit of an exploit but hey I am seriously outnumbered and fighting Macedon and the Egyptians and Pontus, well everyone ...lol!

Don't bother defending the city/town walls, let them exhaust themselves a bit coming to you.

Here it is...
H= Hoplite Armoured
G= General
M= Missile (peltasts)
RH= 'Roving Hoplite'
W= Wall
City/Town Square
General direction of enemy

HHH
HMRHH
HMGMMH
wwwwwwwwwwww

I use the roving Hoplite unit to reinforce my line where needed.
I have lost many troops and reinforced from Thermon but the Romans have lost 10x more.

My latest and greatest way of getting Generals too. Have lost one family member to this technique so far but have won every battle.

So, leave a good army at Apollonia and let the Romans come. From your screen shot, I'd use that army nearby to do other things in the area.

Navies are GC's best weapon I think personally.

Navies can blockade in ways other than blockading ports too.

And, as the post above pointed out bridges are the key vs Pontus and Egypt.

Hope this is useful :2cents:

Garvanko
11-02-2005, 23:08
Thanks Dutch Guy, Seamus. Interesting ideas from both.

I have thought about Scenario A, and my initial solution was to build a ship at Athens, transfer my army around the two enemy stacks and place it next to Corinth. This would allow me to attack the main Brutii stack, with reinforcements. Corinth is governed by a four star general, and is full of experienced Hoplites.

Appolonia is difficult. Giving it up puts a lot more pressure on Thermon and opens up Larissa and Thessalonica to western incursions - indeed, its likely the second stack will try to attack Larissa rather than Thermon. The fort idea is interesting, but defending Thermon may have a greater chance of success, considering its stronger fortifications. I take it you both don't favour relieving Appolonia at all.

Scenario B:

Is Sardis really worth it? Strategically it appears weak, and it would need a huge garrison.. Im not sure I can blitz Asia with one major army if, as I fear, Egypt pounces to aid its Ally were Sardis to be taken.

Seamus Fermanagh
11-03-2005, 02:54
Thanks Dutch Guy, Seamus. Interesting ideas from both.

I have thought about Scenario A, and my initial solution was to build a ship at Athens, transfer my army around the two enemy stacks and place it next to Corinth. This would allow me to attack the main Brutii stack, with reinforcements. Corinth is governed by a four star general, and is full of experienced Hoplites.

Appolonia is difficult. Giving it up puts a lot more pressure on Thermon and opens up Larissa and Thessalonica to western incursions - indeed, its likely the second stack will try to attack Larissa rather than Thermon. The fort idea is interesting, but defending Thermon may have a greater chance of success, considering its stronger fortifications. I take it you both don't favour relieving Appolonia at all.

No, not under those conditions. If they are smart enough to attack rather than starve you try bushwhacking in the streets -- don't defend the gate with peasants against equites. Lure 'em in and jump 'em -- take a few with you that way even with peasants. Now, if you had 3-4 decent infantry....
Scenario B:

Is Sardis really worth it? Strategically it appears weak, and it would need a huge garrison.. Im not sure I can blitz Asia with one major army if, as I fear, Egypt pounces to aid its Ally were Sardis to be taken.

I said take it -- not keep it. Raid, Slave, sell buildings and then sell the region back or sell it to Egypt. Your bridge is the bottleneck that will let you keep fewer forces in Asia and sew Greece up. Nice point on the sea-mobile effort, at least hit the one you want first and make it count.

Garvanko
11-03-2005, 10:35
I said take it -- not keep it. Raid, Slave, sell buildings and then sell the region back or sell it to Egypt. Your bridge is the bottleneck that will let you keep fewer forces in Asia and sew Greece up. Nice point on the sea-mobile effort, at least hit the one you want first and make it count.
Scenario A update: As you can see I have destroyed the Brutii army with minimal losses - my reinforcements from Corinth provided excellent covering support in that battle. ~:cheers:

https://img464.imageshack.us/img464/6544/00043kb.th.jpg (https://img464.imageshack.us/my.php?image=00043kb.jpg)

I gave up Appolomia, but have managed to consolidate my forces, and am now launching a counterstrike, first at Appolonia, then hopefully on Salona. My new Faction Leader (other leader died on that last turn) has moved to bolster troops and morale at the front. ~:)

Scenario B update:

Your point was valid Seamus, however I took Sardis and garrisoned, but was promtly seiged on the next turn by Pontus. Nevertheless, Ive got a strong relief force on the bridge from Pergamnum full of Armoured hoplites and Greek Cav ready to relieve, and hopefully cripple the Pontic influence in the area for a few years.

https://img464.imageshack.us/img464/3162/00038fj.th.jpg (https://img464.imageshack.us/my.php?image=00038fj.jpg)

Following that, I hope to consolidate and push my army up to Nicomedia.

So far so good, I think.