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Thread: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

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    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    ΑΝΑΒΑΣΕΙΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ

    Τhe Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia
    by Centurio Nixalsverdrus






    Site of the Makedonian Capital today.


    Χαιρετε! I'm currently one hundred years ahead in my campaign - but you should always watch history from a sufficiently big distance. Since my first report on the same subject was rather shortlived (I knew that and mentioned it right at the beginning), this one will be rather longlived - at least I hope so.

    ~
    Each king in the list of Antigonid dynasts will be mentioned here, starting with the first, Antigonos II. Gonatas. Recent excavations at the site of the palace at Pella have revealed to historians an unprecedented insight into the politics of the Makedonian Empire, starting at 272 BC, the year 46 of the Makedonian calendar. I used my deep insights to present you a short summary of the lives and deeds of the βασιλεις [1] that shaped the world to their liking - the αναβασεις [2].


    Table of Content

    Anabasis Antigonou (283 – 246 BC)
    Introduction – The Pyrrhic Incursion
    Part 1 – The Chremonidean War (272 – 269 BC)
    Part 2 – The First Epeirote War (273 – 265 BC)
    Part 3 – The Kalabrian War (263 – 257 BC)
    Part 4 – Hegemony (256 – 246 BC)


    Anabasis Alkyoneos (246 – 230 BC)
    Introduction – A Momentous Treaty
    Part 1 – The Ptolemaic War: The Campaigns in Mikra Asia (243 – 236 BC)
    Part 2 – The Pontic and Kappadokian War (240 – 232 BC)
    Part 3 – The Ptolemaic War: The Campaigns in Syria (234 – 230 BC)


    Anabasis Perseos (230 – 212 BC)
    Introduction – Reforms and Revolts



    ~
    Note that there will be some Greek expressions like [1] αναβασεις (the Anabaseis) or [2] βασιλεις (the kings) that will show in Greek letters. However, not every Greek word will be written in Greek, only some that would keep their Greek character albeit transscripted into English. This will mostly apply to epithets and unit names. In any case you'll find a footnote for each in the respective chapter. Also note that I will keep the Greek words in minuscules due to their appearance in the text. The contemporaries wrote exclusivly in capital letters.
    Last edited by Centurio Nixalsverdrus; 08-24-2009 at 03:31.

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    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Anabasis Antigonou (283 – 246 BC)


    Introduction – The Pyrrhic Incursion

    In 272 BC, Makedonia was still a young power. In fact, it again had yet to become something resembling a power. For the majority of its history, it had been a poor country. It is situated at the northern edge of the Greek peninsula, basically the land that lies above the Gulf of Thermai, which extends between the northern shores of Thessalia, the Makedonian lowland and the Chalkidike peninsula. The cities on the shores of the gulf were originally free πολεις (poleis, cities) that had been subjugated by the Makedonian kings not very long ago. The lands of Upper Makedonia, regions like Elymaia and Eordaia, Orestis and Lynkestis were more loyal to their respective nobles than to their king who always had to take into consideration the interests of these men.

    Pella, the Makedonian Capital had been founded only 140 years ago at the end of the fifth century by King Archelaos I. The Greeks of the poleis to the south looked down upon the Makedones and called them βαρβαροι (barbaroi, barbarians), setting them on a level with Thracians or Illyrians. Despite their Greek tongue, the Makedones were for a long time denied participation at the Olympic Games in Elis. The motor of Greek culture were the poleis, and not the poor kingdom to the north. Makedonia’s importance was limited to being a producer of timber and pitch for a long time.


    The Kingdom under Philippos II.

    When Philippos II. and Alexandros III. Μεγας (Megas, the Great) reigned over Makedonia, the country saw its greatest extent. Philipp invented the famous phalanx and subjugated the southern Greeks and Thracians alike. Alexander took the stunning work of his father and made it into a masterpiece; his kingdom reached from the Adriatic in the west to the Oxos river in the east, to a country that Greeks had not even heard of before. However, as is well known in history, the empire soon crumbled upon the Great’s death and fell into inner feuding between his former generals. Makedonia itself had to stick to a well known role: that of a minor kingdom at the edge, be it the edge of the world or the edge of the civilisation of Hellas.

    The present King of Makedonia, Antigonos II. Γονατας (Gonatas, "the Knock-Kneed"), was the son of Demetrios Πολιορκητης (Poliorketes, the Besieger), who in turn was the son of Antigonos Μονοφθαλμος (Monophthalmos, the One-Eyed). He claimed the title of Βασιλευς Μακεδονιας (Basileus Makedonias, King of Makedonia) in 283 BC, but it wasn’t until 276 BC that he could really take possession of the throne of the Kingdom. He was held captive by Pyrrhos of Epeiros, Lysimachos, Seleukos and Ptolemaios Κεραυνος (Keraunos, "Lightning") who was killed during the Celtic invasion in 279 BC. Antigonos fought off the Celts and defeated them two years later at Lysimachia, which earned him enough support to be acclaimed King by the Assembly of the Army.

    Due to its geographic position, Makedonia was often subject to incursions from different people: Thracians, Illyrians, Greeks, Persians, recently Celts and, at the moment, Epeirotes. The Epeirote League, consisting of the three chief tribes of the region, the Chaionians, the Thesprotians and the Molossians, was presided by the Molossian King Pyrrhos. With an eventful past as Demetrios Poliorketes' general and hostage at Ptolemaios’ court, the Aiakides had become one of the most talented, admired and feared leaders of the time. He had campaigned against the Romans in Italy, and against the Carthaginians in Sicily. Pyrrhos decided the time was ripe to once again claim the throne of Makedonia for himself and crossed the sea to Hellas with 8000 foot and 500 horse. He defeated Antigonos and took possession of central Makedonia, leaving only the coastal cities to the Makedonian. Gallic mercenaries looted the Royal Tombs of the Argeades at Aigai, leaving the bones scattered about. Such insults were it that brought the Makedones up against Pyrrhos, giving Antigonos a breath to rally fresh troops in Greece.

    Antigonos was soon joined by his brother Krateros. The combined force sailed north along the coast and disembarked in Thessalonike. In the meantime, Antigonos’ son and heir to the throne Alkyoneus had to defend Pella against an Epeirote attack. In the absence of the king, Pyrrhos had thought it wise to divide his forces, dispatching a smaller contingent, counting no more than 11,000 foot and 12 elephants, to attack the Capital of the Makedones. He intended a rush to take Pella by surprise, without wasting time on the construction of siege works, as it fitted the Epeirote’s character. But Alkyoneus proved himself an able leader: with over 3,500 ψιλοι (Psiloi, skirmishers of lower rank) from the Makedonian highland, he managed to kill the elephants from behind the walls, forcing the Epeirotes to retreat.


    The defence-works at Pella were in a bad state at that time.

    Pleased by the good news from his son, Antigonos started to march his army westward. With him were 20,000 foot, including 9,600 φαλαγγιται (Phalangitai), and 2,000 horse. The army of Pyrrhos was outnumbered by 1:2, but Pyrrhos had another 12 elephants, a better trained phalanx, a regiment of υπασπισται (Hypaspistai), Cretan archers and Thracian πελτασται (Peltastai). The armies met on a plain near the city of Edessa in Bottia. Under heavy casualties, the Makedonian cavalry managed to bring down the elephants on the Epeirote right, whereas Pyrrhos wasted his life on the left wing. Stabbed by a σαρισα (Sarissa, an 18ft lance), the Molossian fell from his horse. Soon the morale of his troops sank and the whole army turned to flee the battle, followed and massacred by the victorious Makedones. That day Antigonos lost a third of his army, some 6,000 stayed on the field. The Epeirotes on the other hand lost their whole army, more than 10,000 men. Pyrrhos had made a strategic error which had cost him his and his soldiers’ lives. Towards the end of the year, Pyrrhos’ son Ptolemaios was caught and killed in Tymphaia. But the Aiakides were by no means defeated, and in the south another threat had already surged.


    Antigonos at Edessa 272 BC.
    Last edited by Centurio Nixalsverdrus; 08-24-2009 at 03:35.

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    Member Member the man with no name's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Interesting. Make it less serious, that way more ppl. will like it. Its the same reason i don't like The Book of Kings, NOT ENOUGH HUMOUR.
    Last edited by the man with no name; 02-26-2009 at 03:10.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamegeek2 View Post

    Steppe battles are very long, but the wars are short.

    Infantry battles aren't as long, but the wars are much longer.

    -gamegeek2
    Campaigns completed: Vanilla Julii

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    Strategos Autokrator Member Vasiliyi's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    I personally like it. its almost like reading a good history book. keep it up! ill be reading this one.

    4x
    1x

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    Misanthropos Member I of the Storm's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    I like it that way too. Nothing wrong with seriousness for me. Although I have slight doubts about the greek letters in the narrative text. Might be more of an obstacle for those who can read greek only with difficulty (like me). Anyway - good start. Keep it up.

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    Symbasileus ton Rhomaioktonon Member Maion Maroneios's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Excellent! Finally, the greatness of Makedonia shall shine again! ALL HAIL MAKEDONIA!

    Maion

    P.S.: Romaioi, tremble...
    ~Maion

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    Satalextos Basileus Seron Member satalexton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    I second that, ALL HAIL MAKEDONIA!!!! =D
    And... DEATH TO THE ROMAIOI!!!




    "ΜΗΔΕΝ ΕΩΡΑΚΕΝΑΙ ΦΟΒΕΡΩΤΕΡΟΝ ΚΑΙ ΔΕΙΝΟΤΕΡΟΝ ΦΑΛΑΓΓΟΣ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΙΚΗΣ" -Lucius Aemilius Paullus

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    Rampant psychopath Member Olaf Blackeyes's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by the man with no name View Post
    Interesting. Make it less serious, that way more ppl. will like it. Its the same reason i don't like The Book of Kings, NOT ENOUGH HUMOUR.
    You know that there are ppl in this world that simply aren't funny right?

    My own personal SLAVE BAND (insert super evil laugh here)
    My balloons:
    My AAR The Story of Souls: A Sweboz AAR
    https://forums.totalwar.org/vb/showthread.php?t=109013


    Quote Originally Posted by Dayve View Post
    You're fighting against the AI... how do you NOT win?

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    Satalextos Basileus Seron Member satalexton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    it's called trolling, and they're -almost- as bad as being a romaioi, especially when they're trolling an AAR of Makedonia. ALL HAIL MAKEDONIA!!!




    "ΜΗΔΕΝ ΕΩΡΑΚΕΝΑΙ ΦΟΒΕΡΩΤΕΡΟΝ ΚΑΙ ΔΕΙΝΟΤΕΡΟΝ ΦΑΛΑΓΓΟΣ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΙΚΗΣ" -Lucius Aemilius Paullus

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    Member Member zooeyglass's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    very good start - excellent attention to the greek and a confident style that i approve of. i look forward to more maps and tales of makedonian derring-do.
    inde consilivm mihi pavca de Avgvsto et extrema tradere, mox Tiberii principatum et cetera, sine ira et stvdio, qvorvm cavsas procvl habeo.

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    EB TRIBVNVS PLEBIS Member MarcusAureliusAntoninus's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Nice start, Centurio!


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    Member Member Dutchhoplite's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Looks interesting :)
    I love the smell of bronze in the morning!

    Campaigns completed: Vanilla Seleucid, EB 1.2. Carthaginian, RSII Pergamon

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    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Thank you very much for your support!! I'm really glad you like it.

    There will be irony in the next update, in a few days problably, I promise. Also, wishes and constructive criticism are always welcome (praises of course too).

    Big thanks to Maion, who provides me with Greek words and their exact spelling! Feel free to comment if you spot an error.
    Last edited by Centurio Nixalsverdrus; 02-26-2009 at 22:02.

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    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    This looks really great!(Added to my favourites)

    I like your style and the screenshots. Hope you will have an epic fight and some occasional setbacks to spice things up
    I am looking forward for the next chapter

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    Symbasileus ton Rhomaioktonon Member Maion Maroneios's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by satalexton View Post
    DEATH TO THE ROMAIOI!!!
    Of course, how could I forget! Btw, all readers of this AAR as well should join our Social Group, the Romaioiktonoi. We lack the necessary manpower to make any legal (*cough*) moves against the filthy barbaroi.

    EDIT: Btw, I believe we should make this our moto. And I mean it's Greek form, so: THANATOS EIS ROMAIOYS!

    Maion
    Last edited by Maion Maroneios; 03-01-2009 at 15:16.
    ~Maion

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    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Part 1 – The Chremonidean War (272 – 269 BC)

    Philippos had once defeated the southern Greeks at Chaironeia and forced them into a thinly disguised subjugation which was denominated “Corinthian League” by later historians. In 335 BC, as Alexander had followed his father on the throne of Makedonia, Thebai revolted and as a consequence was razed to the ground within 12 days. Since then, Greece was dominated by the northern kingdom, but it caused discontent within its leading class that dreamed of the old days of glorious poleis. The most prominent among these men was a man called Chremonides, an experienced and ambitious politician. Observing Makedonia being invaded by the armies of Pyrrhos and barely capable of defending itself, he thought his time had arrived.

    To reach his aims, Chremonides knew he had to find allies who would share his cause. Sparte was a proud city, never having bowed to the northerners. Its military tradition was old, and although the Spartan forces did not resemble their glory of Thermopylai and Plataiai, Chremonides appreciated their worth very much. Rhodos on the other hand was rich, self-confident and, most importantly, its coffers were boasting with silver. Being located in an advantageous and trade-benefiting position, supported by a strong fleet, the Rhodians wanted to extend their power alike. Last, but surely not least, Ptolemaios II. Φιλαδελφος (Philadelphos, “who takes after his brother”) of Alexandria sought to weaken the Antigonids as well, seeing the Seleukid allies as rivals to his increasing power in the Aegean. He gladly donated the funds necessary to build up the needed forces.

    Watching Antigonos sailing north, Chremonides signalled his Spartan allies the moment had come to execute his plan. Eudamidas Eurypontidos of Lakedaimonia assaulted the city of Korinthos with a vastly superior force of hoplites, including the famous Spartans. More than 12,000 were brought to attack the city, which was defended by only 6,000 poorly equipped militia hoplites. Alexandros, the governor of Korinthos, made a sally and managed to kill a good deal of the more lightly equipped enemies, but at the city centre, the defenders stood no chance against the Lakonian Úlite. When Alexandros arrived back at the αγορα (agora, an open place in the centre), it was too late: the defenders had fallen, and the Spartans brought Alexandros down, taking the city and the Peloponnesos.


    Alexandros sallies.


    At the agora.

    Upon hearing the news that Makedonia now had lost all its southern holdings except for the cities of Euboia, Antigonos and Krateros were frozen. Not only had they lost Korinthos, but Krateros had lost his son. For the Greeks of the poleis the war might have been an act of self-defence, but for the Makedones it was rebellion. As news reached Makedonia that an Athenian force had put Demetrias, the city of Antigonos’ father under siege, it was decided that the threat had to be confronted immediately. Having raised new levies of Phalangitai, twenty-five thousand Makedones headed south. The small Athenian force lifted the siege and retreated to Attike. Antigonos rested the winter in Demetrias, and as soon as the roads permitted marching, he continued to Korinthos, taking the city by force. The defenders were few, not more than a thousand, but fought bravely until the end. Eudamidas himself was hit by a roof tile that a pro-Makedonian citizen had thrown onto the combatants from the top of his house.


    Street combat in Korinthos.

    While action was taking place on the Peloponnesos, Areus, the King of Sparte, was campaigning on Kreta where he tried to hire mercenaries for his cause. His success was modest, and upon hearing the news of Eudamidas’ death, he set sail to Attike, disembarked and marched unto Korinthos. Antigonos and Krateros were not idle either and, having large numbers, not quality under their command, decided it would be best to search battle on the open field. The best option for this was a place near Aigosthena, on the isthmus between mainland Greece and the Pelopponesos.


    Makedonian campaigns in 271 BC.

    The Makedones set up camp at the shoreline towards the Gulf of Korinthos. Areus, who was already credited with dementia due to his old age, decided it would be best to attack straight on. 12,000 Athenian troops were on their way to reinforce him, but Areus did not give in to his advisors, instead pointing out that “the glory had to belong to the Spartans,” and so his 12,000 mostly lighter troops, including Cretan archers, had to take on the Makedones on their own. The phalanx held the line as expected, but the Greek citizen militia hoplites on the right, towards the shore, were quickly brought into great danger. Seeing this, Krateros, “
    ο Παλαιμαχος” (o Palaimachos, “the Old Warhorse”) as he was called, lined up his εταιροι (Hetairoi) and λονχοφοροι (Lonchophoroi) on the beach and charged in thunderously, routing not only the Spartan left but the whole body of troops. The enemy inevitably ran for the hills, but very few could flee the unforgiving slashes of the Makedonian κοπεις (Kopeis, slashing swords). To Krateros’ great disappointment, Areus could not be found among the bodies. Only two days later, the Athenians arrived, but the account they gave of themselves was so poor that it suffices to say here that the battle was won, the Greek losses were overwhelming and the King of the Spartans remained missing. History would never reveal anything of him again.


    Krateros charges the Greek left flank.


    At the Gulf of Korinthos.

    The day after, the weakened state of Chremonides’ alliance became obvious. Makedonian scouts reported no Greek forces for the whole of the Peloponnesos, and only few for Attike. Krateros wanted to march south to take revenge for his son, whereas Antigonos wanted to march east to take on Chremonides himself. In a bold decision, the King ordered the army to be divided: for himself, 5,500 Phalangitai, 2,400 Greek militia and the same number of Psiloi, plus an additional 850 Celtic mercenaries. Krateros would lead 6,100 Phalangitai, 1,200
    σφενδωνεται (Sphendonetai), and 950 cavalry.


    Krateros immediately left for the south, and was ambushed near the small city of Lyrkaia by ten thousand lightly armed Lakonians. Krateros ordered his more heavily armed soldiers into the woods, thus avoiding the deadly bullets of the slingers, where they managed to whittle the enemy down in melee. A few weeks later, Krateros found Sparte defended only by Peltastai and a detachment of not more than 120 of the famous σπαρτιαται οπλιται (Spartiatai Hoplitai). Without any further problems, he entered the little, ill-fortified city and easily dealt with its few defenders. Driven by his thirst for revenge and his hatred of everything Spartan, Krateros ordered the population to be massacred. Nevertheless he took advantage of the Spartan society and ordered only the ομοιοι (Homoioi, Spartans by blood) to be slaughtered – a wise move that granted the overwhelming support of the Lakonian populace.

    To the north, as his brother was slaughtering the Lakedaimonians, Antigonos had reached the region of Acharnai in Attike, as he was suddenly confronted by a light Greek force, numbering some 8,000 foot, of whom no more than 2,500 were hoplites. The terrain was favourable and the attack of the Hellenes easily repelled. Antigonos though gave chase to catch Chremonides, but he was protected by his bodyguards, and so the Athenian managed to save his life and flee. Antigonos laid siege to the city. After a year of war in the south, the army spent the winter in front of the famous polis.


    At Acharnai.


    Antigonos and Chremonides.

    When spring hit, the King was soon informed of a new Epeirote incursion into Makedonia. Antigonos left for the north, and the siege of Athenai was continued by the troops of Krateros under General Hesperos. Krateros himself was busy setting up Makedonian order for Lakonia. However, as soon as the King had left the theatre, a noble called Chaireias of Thasos landed with 3,200 hoplites and 3,000 light horse on the shores of Attike to relieve Chremonides. Hesperos had only 7,200 levied Makedones at his disposal against the Úlite of Chaireias’ and Chremonides’ hand-picked guards and decided to position his phalanx on a steep hillside near the city. His Sphendonetai took care of the enemy’s
    ιππακοντισται (Hippakontistai); the superior force of Makedonian and Thessalian heavy cavalry reigned the field unchallenged, slaughtering the enemy skirmishers. Under great losses, the phalanx could fight off the attack of the Greek επικλετοι οπλιται (Epikletoi Hoplitai, the “Chosen Hoplites”). Eventually their morale broke and the northerners chased them back to the city. This time neither Chremonides nor Chaireias could be protected by their bodyguards: both stayed on the field.


    At Athenai.

    Although their leader had fallen, the polis resisted further and levied new troops in the Iphikratean style. The city continued under siege, but the league that Chremonides had formed had ceased to exist. Almost two years later, in the winter of 269 BC, the Athenians made their last sally. Those among the rich citizens that had supported the league and survived where sold into slavery. Euchrous of Mytilene, at the time commander of the Makedonian forces in Attike, did not dare to touch the
    ακροπολις (Akropolis, the hill-city) though and left the city intact. Five years later, Alkyoneus captured Rhodos and destroyed the κολοσσος (Kolossos), visible sign of Makedonian humiliation. The resistance that Chremonides had formed ended all dreams of Greek independence for fifty years to come.

    Last edited by Centurio Nixalsverdrus; 04-02-2009 at 02:37.

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    Member Member the man with no name's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by Olaf Blackeyes View Post
    You know that there are ppl in this world that simply aren't funny right?
    I guess your right. i'm just used to funny AAR's
    My balloons:

    Quote Originally Posted by gamegeek2 View Post

    Steppe battles are very long, but the wars are short.

    Infantry battles aren't as long, but the wars are much longer.

    -gamegeek2
    Campaigns completed: Vanilla Julii

  18. #18
    Rampant psychopath Member Olaf Blackeyes's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Dammit!!
    Why is it that the little guys NEVER win?

    My own personal SLAVE BAND (insert super evil laugh here)
    My balloons:
    My AAR The Story of Souls: A Sweboz AAR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dayve View Post
    You're fighting against the AI... how do you NOT win?

  19. #19
    Member Member the man with no name's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by Olaf Blackeyes View Post
    Dammit!!
    Why is it that the little guys NEVER win?
    Exactly.
    My balloons:

    Quote Originally Posted by gamegeek2 View Post

    Steppe battles are very long, but the wars are short.

    Infantry battles aren't as long, but the wars are much longer.

    -gamegeek2
    Campaigns completed: Vanilla Julii

  20. #20
    Dux and Strategos Member Potocello's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Oh how dare you kill the KH! They are the only real Greeks, Makedonian barbaroi get out of Greece

    Sorry Maion, it needed to be said

    Anyway, nice AAR it's a good read
    "Go and tell the Spartans, stranger passing by, that here obedient to their laws we lie"
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    Satalextos Basileus Seron Member satalexton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    *impales Potocello with a plasma sarrisa*

    ALL HAIL MAKEDONIA!!!!!




    "ΜΗΔΕΝ ΕΩΡΑΚΕΝΑΙ ΦΟΒΕΡΩΤΕΡΟΝ ΚΑΙ ΔΕΙΝΟΤΕΡΟΝ ΦΑΛΑΓΓΟΣ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΙΚΗΣ" -Lucius Aemilius Paullus

  22. #22
    EB TRIBVNVS PLEBIS Member MarcusAureliusAntoninus's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Good chapter. Good to see united under strong leadership.

    I was sad Alexandros died. He was important in my game/AAR.


  23. #23
    Symbasileus ton Rhomaioktonon Member Maion Maroneios's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by Potocello View Post
    Oh how dare you kill the KH! They are the only real Greeks, Makedonian barbaroi get out of Greece

    Sorry Maion, it needed to be said

    Anyway, nice AAR it's a good read
    You are a filthy barbaros blasphemer! Us, Makedones, sons of the Dorieis of which the Lakedaimonioi hail from, being called barbaroi?

    Btw, excellent update Centurio

    Maion
    Last edited by Maion Maroneios; 03-05-2009 at 16:17.
    ~Maion

  24. #24
    Dux and Strategos Member Potocello's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Quote Originally Posted by Maion Maroneios View Post
    You are a filthy barbaros blasphemer! Us, Makedones, sons of the Dorieis of which the Lakedaimonioi hail from, being called barbaroi?

    Btw, excellent update Centurio

    Maion
    heh heh heh
    "Go and tell the Spartans, stranger passing by, that here obedient to their laws we lie"
    - from Tiberius Claudius Marcellus

    Look out for the upcoming PBM! Get ready to defend your tribe from both external and internal rivals!

  25. #25
    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Thanks everyone!

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusAureliusAntoninus View Post
    Good chapter. Good to see united under strong leadership.

    I was sad Alexandros died. He was important in my game/AAR.
    I was sad too since his name was Alexandros. I fear that this won't be the last disappointment about characters that played an important role in the parallel universe of the Antigonids.

  26. #26

    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    i agree with maion and saxalton macedon the truely greatest kingdom and nice aar

  27. #27
    Member Member Africanvs's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Nice AAR, keep it up! :)
    "Insipientis est dicere, Non putarvm."

    "It is the part of a fool to say, I should not have thought."
    -Pvblivs Cornelivs Scipio Africanvs


    Lives: Pvblivs Cornelivs Scipio (A Romani AAR)
    Lives: Alkyoneus Argeades (A Makedonian AAR)


  28. #28
    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Thanks for your comments, the next chapter is underway.

  29. #29
    Βασιλευς και Αυτοκρατωρ Αρχης Member Centurio Nixalsverdrus's Avatar
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    Default AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Part 2 – The First Epeirote War (273 – 265 BC)

    When word reached Antigonos that the Epeirotes had invaded Makedonia once more, he left the siege of Athenai to his loyal officer Hesperos, again opting for the route via the Gulf of Thermai. That would have narrowly proved fatal: opposite of Pydna the fleet was attacked by pirates far superior to the Makedones, albeit only in numbers. Antigonos’ sailors were almost at the point of ignoring all order and fleeing when they saw them, but the King gave an encouraging speech and managed to turn the tide. Some vessels and soldiers were lost, but the bulk of the troops reached Thessalonike in safety. Rumours circulated that the pirates were sent by Ptolemaios of Alexandria; but, like always when the Ptolemaioi were involved, nothing could be proved.

    In Makedonia, Alkyoneus had already assembled another two regiments of Phalangitai. Antigonos and the heir to the throne joined and marched westward, past Edessa into Eordaia. Near the town of Bokeria, the army met the forces of Kyniskos Kartonos, a general of the Aiakides from Taras. He had 16,000 under his command, of whom were 1,800 προδρομοι (Prodromoi), and another thousand of the feared Illyrian cavalry. The Makedones had only 150 loyal retainers on horseback, but 18,000 infantry. At first the Epeirotes were greeted by the Makedonian Sphendonetai with a hail of lead. Kartonos started a diversionary attack on the phalanx when the Illyrians attacked the weak Makedonian left. Antigonos and Alkyoneus charged them and, although outnumbered, managed to chase them off the field. The whole Epeirote army lost the faith in victory and routed. The Makedones gave chase and managed to kill Kyniskos.


    Kyniskos Kartonos at Bokeria.



    Antigonos charges the Illyrian Cavalry.

    In winter camp, Antigonos decided that, after two decisive victories, the time was right to offer the Epeirotes a peace treaty. Ambassadors were sent over the mountainside, but returned with a rejection. Having still forces at his disposal, Helenos Aiakides, Pyrrhos’ son and new leader of the Epeirote League, aimed to revenge his brother and father. Alkyoneus returned to Pella and sent his father new recruits to replenish his ranks.

    When spring arrived, the Makedones continued their march through the wilderness when they were suddenly ambushed by an enemy force near Argos Orestikon. On a steep slope, covered with thick wood, the Makedones ran into Gallic mercenaries and Greek ιππεις (Hippeis), but mostly skirmishers, perfectly fitted for combat in rugged terrain, more than 7,000 ακοντισται (Akontistai) on foot and 2,000 mounted. Especially the phalanx, that couldn’t act cohesively, and the militia hoplites suffered horrible casualties. In the end though, the Makedones managed to slaughter the foe in the forests. Many of the Psiloi fled into the thicket and were never seen again.


    Epeirote levy in the wilderness of Orestis.



    The phalanx sustained heavy casualties.

    Now aware of the tactics that the new king of the Molossians preferred to employ, Antigonos ordered extreme caution during the march through the Balkans. After a month in the wilderness, the Makedones rejoiced when they arrived on an open plain near the shores of the Ionian Sea. To their north lay the town of Epidamnos, from where the Epeirotes used to control the southern part of Illyria. Outside the city was Helenos with more than 6,000 levied Illyrians. Antigonos immidiately attacked and routed the small force, but Helenos managed to escape to Epidamnos. When the citizens saw Antigonos’ army, they promptly surrendered the city to him. In the modest palace, the young king was found dead. Disappointed by the cowardice of his underlings, he had ended his life with his own sword.

    While King Antigonos campaigned in Illyria Hellenike to get rid of a smaller army loyal to the Molossians, Prince Alkyoneus in Makedonia managed to obtain a peace treaty with the Getic Confederacy to the north. The Getai lived north of the Istros River (the Danube), even north of the Traikians with whom they were closely related by culture and language. It was in Makedonias best interest. The Getai were a rising power, their King had only recently subjugated the tribes to the west, and within the next 15 years, the relations between Makedonia and the Getic Confederation would grow into a strong alliance. So content upon hearing the good news, Antigonos congratulated his son to his success and sent another diplomatic envoy to the Epeirote League, thinking he could take advantage of the uncertainty that reigned with regards to the leadership of the League.


    A map of Antigonos' campaigns during the First Epeirote War.

    As the Epeirotes did not answer, Antigonos' officers wanted the King to exert more pressure on the enemy and march south, to Ambrakia. But the King was reluctant. He was totally content with the direction the things had taken. Athenai had fallen, the Greeks were garrisoned and ruled by loyal puppets, and he had just conquered an access to the Ionian Sea for his kingdom. Why wasting more efforts on the Epeirotes? When word reached Antigonos that they were assembling an army though, he regretfully gave in and ordered the invasion of Epeiros proper.

    After having been reinforced by Alkyoneus, Antigonos met his enemies in 267 BC, the 17th year of his reign. A Tarantine called Antinous Kestrideus had been appointed Στρατηγος Αυτοκρατωρ (Strategos Autokrator, Commander-in-Chief) by the representatives of the Epeirote tribes. In the summer heat, the armies met only a short distance west of Dodona, the site of the famous Oracle of Zeus. The two armies numbered both roughly 20,000. On the Makedonian side, 13,000 Phalangitai, 3,600 militia hoplites and 3,200 Psiloi. The only cavalry of the Makedones consisted of the 150 Hetairoi of Antigonos and Alkyoneus. On the Epeirote side, only a small phalanx, almost 5,000 poorly equipped hoplites, 2,000 Gallic mercenaries and 1,600 Θορακιται (Thorakitai). The cavalry was the pride of their army, 1,000 Prodromoi and even 1,000 of the Úlite εταιροι ασπιδοφοροι (Hetairoi Aspidophoroi), completed by numerous Psiloi, both on foot and horse.

    The terrain at Dodona was uneven, a lot of wood covered the ground. Antigonos arrayed his troops in a long line on a gently rising open slope. The Makedones could not see the enemy, which terrified them greatly. Then suddenly, the Epeirote cavalry broke through. The light Hetairoi started to pelt the left flank with javelins, thus making the Makedones suffer great casualties before their own cavalry managed to drive them off the field. As Antigonos was chasing the Aspidophoroi, the heavy Epeirote Thorakitai made use of his absence and attacked the weakened left, whereas the Gallic mercenaries threw themselves against the Sarissai of the Phalanx. Soon the Epeirote commander and his own Molossian retainers entered the clearing and routed the Makedonian left, bringing the entire Phalanx into great danger. At this moment, Antigonos arrived back from his chase. Although already greatly tired, he charged the enemy in the back. Now under pressure himself, Antinous gave signal for retreat. The Makedones wanted to follow them, but their king wisely made them hold their ground instead, rightfully fearing the dangers of uncontrolled combat in the wood.


    Hetairoi Aspidophoroi at Dodona.



    The main battle line.

    The next day, the Epeirotes would have regained their order and made a second attack. They did not change their tactics though, and the fight developed in the same manner as seen before. The Thorakitai attacked the Makedonian left flank, and the Molossian retainers charged in. The Makedonian cavalry attacked the enemy force from behind, managing to kill the Epeirote Strategos. The whole army broke, and this time Antigonos could not prevent his troops from giving chase. The bulk of the Epeirote troops were slaughtered in the wood, the rest deserted and was never seen again. The day cost 4,000 Makedones their lives, but on the enemy’s side the casualties numbered over 20,000.


    Antinous Kestrideus leads his men into battle.



    The Epeirote infantry routs.

    One week later, Antigonos and Alkyoneus entered the city of Ambrakia without any further resistance. The remainder of the Epeirote leading class, mainly the rest of the Aiakid dynasty and their most influential generals, had hastily left Greece for Italy or had already been there, occupied with their other war against the rising city of Roma. From their stronghold in Taras, the Aiakides managed to continue the war against the Antigonids at sea. Their fleet even managed to beat the Makedonian one before it was finally beaten in 265 BC near the mouth of the Ambrakian Gulf.

    This marked the final end of the First Epeirote war. It had lasted for eight years of bitter fighting. It was started by Pyrrhos when the height of his power had already passed, and its outcome decided the fate of Epeiros. It was now under Makedonian control; Antigonos installed the same type of administration in the west as he did in the south, an indirect rule via loyal local rulers, backed up by a strong Makedonian garrison. Even with the Ptolemaioi, who were occupied with their own war against the Seleukidai, a peace treaty could be achieved. All of a sudden, the Makedonian Kingdom was the hegemonial power in Greece once more, a position lost since the days of Demetrios Poliorketes.
    Last edited by Centurio Nixalsverdrus; 04-02-2009 at 02:29.

  30. #30
    Symbasileus ton Rhomaioktonon Member Maion Maroneios's Avatar
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    Default Re: AW: The Anabaseis of the Kings of Makedonia

    Excellent, as always. By the way, the little "treat" for the viewers we've discussed is underway. It took me a lot longer to finish, since RL (University, mostly) is costing me WAY too much time...

    Maion
    ~Maion

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