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Thread: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

  1. #31
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    One finally point is the traveller's log, for the sake of consistency, should be written in the third person.



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  2. #32

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Edit
    Last edited by I Am Herenow; 08-06-2017 at 17:35.

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  3. #33
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Flatout Minigame Champion Arjos's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Both parts should be fixed now, I restructured most phrases for a smoother read :P

    As for the British vs US conventions, I probably don't know them all and might've missed some...

  4. #34

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Hello, I've never participated in any discussions here although I lurk often in these forums. Since you asked for the public's help I think I could make a meaningful contribution in this sector. I'm not a professional historian but I have a keen interest in history.
    So, to get to the point, is Aitolia taken? If not, I'd be glad to write a description for the province.
    Last edited by spade; 05-06-2013 at 20:52.
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  5. #35
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Feel free to give it a shot.



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  6. #36

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Brennus View Post
    Feel free to give it a shot.
    Alright, should I post a description here or send it over by PM?

    Edit:

    According to the map of the first page the border between Attike and Aitolia runs on the west side of what seems to be Parnassus mountain. As this is where the ancient region of Phocis was located does it mean that Phocis, along with Delphi etc, passes to Attike rather than Aitolia?
    Last edited by spade; 05-06-2013 at 21:36.
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  7. #37
    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Good catch! Anyway, Delphi has their own description - a dedicated unique building - which is written already, so need not to worry too much about it.

    In any case, many thanks for your help!

  8. #38

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Greetings from another long time lurker. I'd be willing to give Lakonike a shot, if it is still available. I'm not sure I will find enough sources, but if I do not, I will let you know. On a side note, do we have to cite our sources?

    Greetings,

    Adalingum

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  9. #39
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Lakonike seems to be still available.

    With regard to sources, as a general rule, for the traveller's log section: no; for the rest: cite the ancient sources that are relevant, but not anything modern that you may use.
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
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    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  10. #40
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius Scribonius Curio View Post
    Lakonike seems to be still available.

    With regard to sources, as a general rule, for the traveller's log section: no; for the rest: cite the ancient sources that are relevant, but not anything modern that you may use.
    Fortunately my fellow team members, as a result of above general rule, have yet to realise that almost all the research I have provided on the Celts comes from the work of Goscinny and Uderzo.



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  11. #41
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    For clarity: if we take issue with something that you claim we may ask you for your source, but in the description itself there is no need...
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
    perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna:
    quale per incertam lunam sub luce maligna
    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  12. #42

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius Scribonius Curio View Post
    For clarity: if we take issue with something that you claim we may ask you for your source, but in the description itself there is no need...
    Thanks for explaining @Gaius Scribonius Curio, just found a pdf of 'Sparta And Lakonia, A Regional History 1300 - 362 BC'. So if you'll excuse me, gentlemen and gentlewomen, I've got research to do.

    Have a good day,

    Adalingum
    Last edited by Adalingum; 05-07-2013 at 10:28. Reason: trying not to be sexist

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  13. #43
    Member Member Friendly Sword's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Hi there!

    I am another lurker who was looking for a fun way to pass time this summer and discovered that EB II is still under construction! Being an amateur historian with a smattering of knowledge about Berber history, I'd love to help as well.

    I'd love to take a crack at writing something up for Gaetulia and perhaps Phazania as well.

    Two questions though. First, to what extent should be we try to emulate the example that has been provided? Is it acceptable to structure each section differently than Brennus? For example, I'm not sure that focusing on archaeological evidence will be as fruitful for Gaetulia as it was for Combrogon. Additionally, given that the Gaetuli don't get written about much at all under rather late in the establishment of the Roman Empire, my history of the region may focus on later events slightly more.

    Second, I am just curious about the selection of Aghlan as the settlement, given that it is even less certain there was anything of that name prior to the early middle ages. Additionally, apart from a small cave there is no evidence for earlier in-habitation. As I understand it, the Zenata/Mozabites didn't even migrate to the area from the northwest until the ninth century AD, and the name Aghlan comes from them. The name Dimmidi would seem a better candidate, given the high possibility of the Roman name coming from a Berber origin. Another alternative might also be Gemellae/Millae/M'Li/M'Lili (though it would be on the extreme eastern edge of the borders you've given Gaetulia in the mainmap).

    I could be wrong (I have no access to any Latin or Arabic sources directly), but that's what it seems to me. This is an awesome project and I just want to help to make it right. :)
    "Right, as the world goes, is only in question between equals in power, while the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must."

  14. #44

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Sorry to post again.

    Should the strategy part include only the advantages and/or assets of the region in general or also related to the faction they start assigned to? 'Cuz I was wondering about what would have happened if the Chremonidean War would have ended in a victory for the Chremonidean league: I suppose the Spartans would have either quit the league (with its primary target out of the way) or would have tried to begin dominating it á la Peloponnesian league... I suppose I should add ´beware the Spartan loyalty´ in the strategy part as a warning to the player , but only if it has to be so faction-specific.

    Oh stop daydreaming Adalingum and get back to reading that PDF!

    Greetings

    Adalingum

  15. #45
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Adalingum View Post
    Sorry to post again.

    Should the strategy part include only the advantages and/or assets of the region in general or also related to the faction they start assigned to? 'Cuz I was wondering about what would have happened if the Chremonidean War would have ended in a victory for the Chremonidean league: I suppose the Spartans would have either quit the league (with its primary target out of the way) or would have tried to begin dominating it á la Peloponnesian league... I suppose I should add ´beware the Spartan loyalty´ in the strategy part as a warning to the player , but only if it has to be so faction-specific.

    Oh stop daydreaming Adalingum and get back to reading that PDF!

    Greetings

    Adalingum
    I'd keep the strategical information mostly in general, unless it is a rather important gameplay consideration for a specific faction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Friendly Sword View Post
    Hi there!

    I am another lurker who was looking for a fun way to pass time this summer and discovered that EB II is still under construction! Being an amateur historian with a smattering of knowledge about Berber history, I'd love to help as well.

    I'd love to take a crack at writing something up for Gaetulia and perhaps Phazania as well.

    Two questions though. First, to what extent should be we try to emulate the example that has been provided? Is it acceptable to structure each section differently than Brennus? For example, I'm not sure that focusing on archaeological evidence will be as fruitful for Gaetulia as it was for Combrogon. Additionally, given that the Gaetuli don't get written about much at all under rather late in the establishment of the Roman Empire, my history of the region may focus on later events slightly more.

    Second, I am just curious about the selection of Aghlan as the settlement, given that it is even less certain there was anything of that name prior to the early middle ages. Additionally, apart from a small cave there is no evidence for earlier in-habitation. As I understand it, the Zenata/Mozabites didn't even migrate to the area from the northwest until the ninth century AD, and the name Aghlan comes from them. The name Dimmidi would seem a better candidate, given the high possibility of the Roman name coming from a Berber origin. Another alternative might also be Gemellae/Millae/M'Li/M'Lili (though it would be on the extreme eastern edge of the borders you've given Gaetulia in the mainmap).

    I could be wrong (I have no access to any Latin or Arabic sources directly), but that's what it seems to me. This is an awesome project and I just want to help to make it right. :)
    Great we could always use help with Western Africa, as our historians of that specific region are mostly inactive. If you feel after writing the description that you want to contribute more than with just description reading let us know. Also much of the texts of classical historians can be found online for free, if you want to use them.
    I can't answer your question on Aghlan though, sorry.

  16. #46
    Member Member Friendly Sword's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    OK, I've done a bit of research and come up with a rough draft for Gaetulia. Any thoughts?

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Traveller's Log:

    A desolate but spectacular vista awaits the hardy traveller who chooses to head south and cross the mighty Atlas Mountains to the land of Gaetulia. As they crest the rocky height, a land of striking limestone plateaus and windy grasslands opens before them, with hints of the enormous desert that lies beyond glinting in the distance. If the traveller wanders east, they would come across a land of rock and salt, with glittering lakes. To the very south lies the mightiest desert the world has ever known, its vast dunes rising to the height of mountain-tops. Along the hilly hinterland that drifts to the southwest lie valleys home to pastures from which spring thousands of beautiful equine specimens. Riding atop these horses are the rough and capable people of this land, who must wisely migrate and manage their resources to stay alive in these steppes they call home. Proud of their freedom and mobility, these people known as the Gaetuli will fiercely defend the land they call home, even as they eagerly peer beyond its wild boundaries.

    Geography

    Gaetulia is a vast territory that extends across the southern slopes of the Atlas Mountains and into the steppes and desert that lie in the northwest corner of the Sahara. Gaetulia roughly occupies the central third of modern Algeria and includes slices of southeastern Morrocco and southwestern Tunisia. The northern reaches encompass the hills and valleys of the southern Atlas slopes while rock and sand deserts with scarce vegetation and scattered oases lie to the south and east. In the far east of the territory, many salt lakes punctuate the landscape, though they are smaller in size than some of the fabled lakes that extend even further east. Seasonal rivers criss-cross the landscape, most originating in the Saharan Atlas and coming to life only during the winter.
    The vegetation of Gaetulia, where it exists at all, predominately consists of grasses such Aristida pungens and Panicum turgidum and browse shrubs such as several acacias. The grazing decreases rapidly in quality the farther one gets from the Atlas foothills, with Saharan dunes dominating the southernmost portion of Gaetulia. The oases and wadi valleys provide an exception to that rule however, with rather luxurious vegetation shielding them from the desert. In addition, many oases are now home to bountiful date palms, providing both a source of trade and luxury.
    The climate of Gaetulia is typical of desert regions. With the seasons split between hot summers and mild winters the daily climate of the region is marked by very high temperature differences between day and night. Precipitation is low and has been slowly decreasing for centuries, but the area is nonetheless subject to occasional flash floods and rainy winters in the northern steppe. Sandstorms are relatively rare phenomenon in the south and only typically occur between March and June.
    The livestock of Gaetulia is rather limited with goats, cattle, and sheep existing in small numbers in the northern steppes. Horses however exist in great quantities, and the Gaetuli have a well-deserved reputation for breeding some of the finest quality horses in the North African subregion. Camels exist in small quantities, brought by the occasional Gamantine trader all the way from Arabia, but have yet to be utilized in any meaningful ways by the Gaetuli tribes.
    The wildlife of Gaetulia consists of many grazing animals including gazelles, antelopes, and the occasional deer in the northern hills. The predators that exist here are typically small mammals such as hyenas, jackals and the fennec fox. Desert mice and lizards also flourish in the rocks and sands of the southwest.

    The People, Society and Government

    Gaetulia is named for the Gaetuli people, which rather than meaning a specific tribe is instead a term encompassing the confederation of Berber-speaking tribes that lived to the immediate southeast of the Atlas Mountains. Though there existed little in the way of a common political and cultural identity prior to the rise of the northern Numidian kingdoms in the late third century, the existence of pastoral families who had to regulate grazing areas and seasonal movements led to distinct groups that would form the basis of later Gaetuli identity. These groupings formed federative entities, or tribes, with groups of elders. Pliny reports that they were often led by a chief called Aguellid and multiple sources suggest they were united by a common language group called Libyan that they shared with other Numidians.
    Physically the Gaetuli likely resembled the other Numidian groups, though many historical sources make note of the darkness of Gaetuli skin colouration. Ptolemy and Strabo both imply a common origin of the Nubians, Garamantines, and Gaetuli, indicating there is some cause to believe that Gaetuli were ethnically distinct from the northern contemporary and future Berber populations.
    Though the Gaetuli were almost uniformly nomadic when they began to heavily interact with the Carthaginian and Roman conflicts, it is clear that limit cereal agriculture was practiced in many of the valleys and oases that dotted the landscape. In addition, many accounts suggest that seasonal harvests of dates occurred in the eastern oases. The vast majority of Gaetuli however were nomadic pastoralists, specializing in horse breeding and consisting on a diet of milk and flesh from the handful of domesticated animals that were able to subsist on the thin grassy steppes they called home.
    No evidence for urbanization or any type of industry exists, and exports of resources from the area were small in nature prior to contact with Rome. Gaetulia did later become notable for purple dye that was famous in the time of Augustus, purportedly made from the purple shellfish Murex brandaris found in the coastal areas that existed in the western and eastern hinterlands of Gaetuli territory.
    Like other Numidian groups, the Gaetuli religious beliefs centred around perceived sacred presence in elements or places. Stones, trees, mountains were all thought to have special essences. Some animals like the ram, the lion and the snake were also seen as sacred. Several personal divinities are made reference to in historical sources, such as the seven gods inscribed on a relief in Beja, southern Tunisia. Outside influences also exist. The worship of Amun and Athena intermittently occurred among the Gaetuli, though it was far more common in the coastal regions to their east.
    The Gaetuli nomadism prevented the need for large settlements, but many semi-permanent pastured occupied the northern valleys, and permanent camps existed in oases. Fortified palisades were reported to exist in the north and eastern margins of the territory, likely to facilitate the protection of the date-producing oasis agriculture, the only fixed aspect of the Gaetuli economy. The first permanent habitation we have evidence of dates to the Roman occupation of the northern reaches of Gaetulia that accompanied the construction of the Tripolitanian Limes, but it is highly likely that the Roman forts were already places known to the native Gaetuli, perhaps as inhabited locations.

    History

    The history of the Gaetuli and the region to which they gave their name prior to contact with Mediterranean civilization is debatable and unclear, but many broad strokes are evidenced by oral and archaeological clues. The prehistory of Gaetulia begins with a small original population of Nilo-Saharan origin joined by a larger westward migratory group of Afro-Asiatic–speaking pastoralists from the Middle East who brought with them the beginnings of the Neolithic transition to dairying and basic agriculture. These pastoralists were essentially nomadic, living in camps which permitted them to make seasonal moves with their animals. The small numbers of farmers who lived in the desert oases were typically less numerous and subservient to their more mobile neighbors. This was especially the case after the adoption of the horse by pastoralist populations which aided more effective pastoralist techniques. These northwest African pastoralists, like their nomadic counterparts in other parts of the world, developed social organizations characterized by ancient patrilineages. These patrilineages slowly developed into over-arching units which we commonly refer to as tribes.
    By the early third century BC, the tribes of Gaetulia had undergone varying degrees of coalescence and were described by later Hellenistic writers as forming large regional groups with little distinguishing characteristics. Pliny asserts that the Gaetuli were formed into three tribes, the Autotoles in the west, the Baniurae in the east, and the Nesimi in the southern desert. While his summary likely understates the political complexity of the region, it is clear that there were at least several dominant tribes that directed and guided Gaetuli movements and expansion. Ptolemy corroborates Pliny, and adds that the Darrae were subservient to some sort of Gaetuli confederacy.
    Towards the fourth and third centuries, the neighbours of Gaetulia described them in a multiplicity of often contradictory ways. Virgil and some scattered Greek references suggest that the Gaetuli were more savage than their neighbours, but also more loyal. The Aeneid in particular remarks that the Gaetuli were unconquerable by war and implies that they had migrated northwest across the steppe.
    It was the development of centralized Numidian kingdoms by the Massylii & Masaesyli that led to the first seeds of a common Gaetuli identity that pitted independent pastoralism against the more settled and entangled nature of their northern neighbours. In particular, the Gaetuli lacked any deep or institutional links with the burgeoning Punic settlements that dotted the North African coast. Gaetuli contact with Carthage was limited to indirect trade and the occasional mercenary force, and it was likely this lack of contact or shared lifestyle that prohibited lasting occupation of Gaetulia by the Roman Empire in the following century. Virgil’s Aenid involves a purported king Iarbas of Gaetulia as the rival to Aeneas for Queen Dido of Carthage’s affection, but any historical king was more likely to have been of the northern Numidian kingdoms than Gaetulia.
    The first definitive entry of the Gaetuli into written history first appears in during the Jugurthine War towards the end of the second century BC. The historian Sallust claims that prior to this they did not even know the name of Rome and only a handful had existed as part of the Carthaginian mercenaries that had been previously deployed across the Mediterranean. They are said to have joined with Jugurtha in his rebellion against Rome but later appear to have joined in an alliance with Caesar against Juba I. In 25 BC, Augustus reportedly gifted the north of Gaetulia to Juba II together with Mauretania but the Gaetuli responded by rising with arms and massacring the Roman residents. It would not be until a severe defeat had been inflicted on them by Cornelius Lentulus that they submitted to the Numidian king.
    After Mauritania became a Roman province in 40 AD, the Roman governors made frequent expeditions into the Gaetuli territory to the south, and the official view seems to be expressed by Pliny when he says that all Gaetulia as far as the Niger River and the Aethiopian frontier was reckoned as subject to the Empire. Though this claim is considered dubious by many historians, Roman inscriptions prove that Gaetuli served in the auxiliary troops of the empire, and it may be assumed that the country passed within the sphere of Roman influence to some degree, though any direct control was peripherally present at best.
    The headache posed by Gaetuli to Roman authorities and their reputation for violent raids was a contributory cause for the construction of the Limes Tripolitanus, a frontier zone of defensive forts. Any sense of a common Gaetuli identity by either the tribes themselves or outsiders had dissipated by the end of the Roman governorship of North Africa and the Vandal invasion. Much evidence suggests however that of the Berber tribes encountered by the Muslim Arabs in the seventh century, several were direct descendants of the Gaetuli, including the Mussumili and the Zenata.

    Strategy

    With its settlement located far away from any other, and the small nomadic camps unlikely to yield much in the way of resources or benefits to a conquering power, Gaetulia is difficult and unpalatable to capture. Should one wish to securely hold the territories of Numidia to its north however, the wise general would be prudent to take care of a territory liable to be the source of many a pesky and dangerous raiding party. As long as Gaetulia remains free, no ruler of North Africa will remain untroubled.
    "Right, as the world goes, is only in question between equals in power, while the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must."

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  17. #47
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Brilliant!



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  18. #48
    Member Member Friendly Sword's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Do you think the conjecture about the fate of the Gaetuli strays too far away from the time period? It felt nice to include it for a sense of finality, but I could also end the history section at either at close of the Gaetuli revolts or the construction of the Tripolitanian limes.
    "Right, as the world goes, is only in question between equals in power, while the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must."

  19. #49
    RABO! Member Brave Brave Sir Robin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Geez, you got all that together in only a few hours. Very nice! Great job Friendly Sword!
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  20. #50
    Member Member Friendly Sword's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Post-exam unemployment will do that to you. ;)
    "Right, as the world goes, is only in question between equals in power, while the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must."

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  21. #51

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    So, I started writing the traveller's log but I think it might be getting too far and some feedback would be great. I will post what I have written so far below. I still have to add travelling info for Akarnania and the islands of the Ionian Sea (if the latter are included in the province of Aitolia, are they?). I have used a bit of a helleno-centric approach, I was having in mind a person from Athenai, Rhodos or some other place of similar culture who has been to Aitolia and is now summing up his experiences.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Province: Aitolia


    Traveller’s Log:

    Shall the traveller leave the fertile plain of Boiotia and continue towards the direction of the setting sun, that person should find oneself in the land of Aitolia. Aitolia is home to the Phokaeis, the Ozolioi Lokroi, the Aitoloi, the Akarnanes and the Dolopes. Any person travelling from Attike, Rhodos, Sikelia or some other place inhabited by proper Hellenes should be warned. Do not be fooled by the similarity of their language to that of the Spartiates or the Korinthioi. They are semi-barbarous people and although some of them live in small poleis, the majority is not accustomed to the civilised life of the polis preferring instead a life similar to that of the barbarous ethne of the north. It has to be stressed however that although the people of this land live a simple and unassuming life, they are fearsome warriors and hard as the land they inhabit. So, these people have recently shown great potential and perseverance. The inhabitants of Aitolia, together with the Malians of southern Thessalia, have formed the now mighty Aitolikon Koinon which rules this rugged land of high mountains, fabled caves and sacred springs.

    The first region under the Aitolikon Koinon one shall encounter on his travels is that of Phokis. Here, on the slopes of Parnassos mountain the Python guarded the Navel of the Earth until Apollo slew him and established his most sacred precinct, that of Delphoi. It is doubtful that the visitor of this place knows nothing of the great Sanctuary, famous around the Kosmos for its Oracle. If this is the case however, it is advised that the traveller visit the Sanctuary himself to learn its history and pray to Apollo for the difficult journey awaiting ahead, deeper into Aitolia. Before departing from Phokis, the traveller should know of the Korykion cave. It is a place sacred to Apollo, among others which however are of lesser beauty and importance, located on the upland pastures of Parnassos, north of Delphoi. It is here that the nymphs Korykia, Kleodora and Melaina, the Muses as well as Pan are worshiped.

    Leaving Delphoi and continuing west across the plain of Krissa, the traveller will reach the land of Ozolia Lokris also known as Esperia Lokris for the region of Phokis separates the land of the Lokroi in two parts. The eastern part belongs to the Opountioi Lokroi, facing the sea of Evrippos and the island of Euboia. The western part is the aforementioned land of the Ozolioi Lokroi and its people are members of the Aitolikon Koinon. At this point, the traveller should make a decision. He can cross the plain of Krissa in the southern direction and then board a ship from the port of Kirra so that he can reach Naupaktos, the the main port of the Ozolioi Lokroi, with speed and safety. However, the traveller might want follow the example of Herakles and prefer the most dangerous route instead. As the latter choice is not as straightforward as the first it will be described in some detail.

    On the western edge of the plain of Krissa the traveller will have to ascend the mighty Aselenon mountain. At its feet the traveller can visit the main polis of the Ozolioi Lokroi which is called Amphissa. This is a good time for rest and resupply if possible. Beyond Amphissa lies the imposing Aselenon Oros. It is a place of high cliffs, deep canyons and upland pastures where herders graze their flocks during the summer. One should take great care if he decides to cross this range during the winter as frost and snow render the passage of this mountain extremely hazardous to anyone not accustomed to this kind of terrain. Continuing on a western or south-western course, the daring traveller would come upon the mountain range of Korax. It is of great height and similar to Aselenon. It is recommended that the traveller should prefer a south-western course that will lead him to Naupaktos rather than continue on a western course aiming straight for Thermon. If the latter is decided then great care is advised due to the hazardous terrain. Again, what applies for Aselenon should apply for Korax, especially during the winter.

    Should the traveller reach Naupaktos, either by land or by sea, there are a few points of interest. Naupaktos lies very close to the border with Aitolia proper. In fact, one should consider the promontory of Antirrhion the westernmost point of Ozolia Lokris by the sea. From Antirrhion, if the traveller looks to the west would notice a rather steep mountain rising next to the water. This is called Taphiassus and according to some, the western part of Lokris took the name Ozolia from the smell of the springs located at the feet of this mountain.

    After Ozolia Lokris, the traveller will enter the region of Aitolia proper, home of the Aitoloi who are the founders of the Aitolikon Koinon. Aitolia is divided in two parts. The first is Archaia Aitolia, the original home of the Aitoloi. The second is called Aitolia Epiktetos, which signifies that this part was acquired in a later time by the Aitoloi. Archaia Aitolia is bounded by Akarnania on the west with the boundary between the two regions running along the river Acheloos. The eastern boundary runs along the river Euenos. The river Euenos is rightly famous across Hellas for it is here that Herakles killed Nessos, the centaur who shamelessly tried to steal the heroe’s wife. To the north it is bounded by Thermon, one of the most important meeting places of the Aitolikon Koinon and a centre of Aitolia. It should be noted that Thermon is more of an administrative and religious centre rather than a polis similar to those of Athenai or Korinthos. However it has been recently fortified signifying its ever increasing importance. If the passer-by wishes so, he can stop to rest in this place for a while. Moreover, it would be prudent to offer a sacrifice to Apollo for the safe continuation of the journey. Aitolia Epiktetos consists of the rest of the mountains to the north as well as the coast between Euenos and Ozolia Locris.

    Apart from Thermon, there is not much of significance to see in Aitolia proper. The Aitoloi are a rather backwards people and of dubious reputation but they are hardy and competent warriors as well. One should not forget, now or ever, that it was the fighting prowess of the Aitoloi that put an end to the destruction brought upon Hellas by the fearsome host of the Keltoi not so long ago. What the general Thukidides correctly remarked in his histories regarding the unassuming polis of Sparte compared to the fame of its citizens, the same holds truth for the Aitoloi. For the region they inhabit is mostly poor, mountainous and unproductive. Its people in their lives resemble the northern barbarians rather than the rest of the Hellenes. However, the Aitolikon Koinon which they formed is only second to the power of the Makedones, should they not faulter before the basileus of Epeiros.

    To the north of Aitolia Epiktetos, if the traveller wishes to travel, there are the mountains inhabited by the Dolopes. They are members of the Aitolikon Koinon and their land is no different to the mountains of Aitolia or Ozolia Lokris. Thus, it is not advised to travel there unless there is a reason of utmost importance. The Dolopes themselves are mainly pastoral people and not great in number. Thus, their loyalties could shift in favour of the Thessaloi or Epeirotes in case the Koinon is found under great threat from those people.

    [To be continued]
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  22. #52
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spade View Post
    So, I started writing the traveller's log but I think it might be getting too far and some feedback would be great. I will post what I have written so far below. I still have to add travelling info for Akarnania and the islands of the Ionian Sea (if the latter are included in the province of Aitolia, are they?). I have used a bit of a helleno-centric approach, I was having in mind a person from Athenai, Rhodos or some other place of similar culture who has been to Aitolia and is now summing up his experiences.
    In my opinion your tone is excellent, and the information you provide fits the brief well. A helleno-centric approach is perfect for a description of a Hellenic place.

    As you yourself highlight, however, it is a bit lengthy. The idea of the traveller's log section is really to provide a brief overview in the style of an ancient author, to provide character, but more importantly, to introduce the geography and history sections. So while, as far as I am concerned, your start is wonderful, it does need to be cut back. See Brennus, Arjos and Friendly Sword's examples above for an idea of the correct length.

    What I would suggest is retaining the first paragraph as is and try to reduce your descriptions of individual cities to a single paragraph - omit some, cut others to one or a few sentences - exactly how is up to you. This is not to say that you cannot discuss the individual cities in your historical section, but what you do need to bear in mind is that the introductory material is an overview of the region at large.
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
    perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna:
    quale per incertam lunam sub luce maligna
    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  23. #53
    EBII Hod Carrier Member QuintusSertorius's Avatar
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    Here's my first draft of Kyrenaia, comments welcome:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Province: Kyrenaia

    Traveller’s Log

    The traveller arrives from the sea, leaving Egypt and therefore Asia in the east, thus arriving in Libya (Africa) and making landfall in the heavily forested uplands of the eastern Libyan coast, at Apollonia. Nestled in this mountainous plateau in a fertile valley to the southwest of the port town is the principal settlement and seat of power, the Greek polis of Kyrene. It leads the five mighty Greek cities of the Pentapolis, which dominate the western side of Kyrenaia, and besides the capital include Taucheira, Euesperides, Balagrae and Barca. They are clustered in a region called Irasa. To the east is Marmarica, a much drier region of a sparsely populated villages where the desert reaches almost to the coast. Salt collection and sponge fishing are more important sources of income than agriculture here. This extends as far south as the oasis of Ammonium, a sanctuary to Ammon and home of a famed oracle.


    Geography

    Libya was the Greek term for the entire continent of Africa, consisting of all the landmass that was not Egypt (which itself was considered part of Asia). According to Herodotus, it was first circumnavigated by the Phoenicians at the behest of the Egyptian king Necos. Kyrenaia equates to the eastern half of the modern state of Libya, rising steeply from the Mediterranean sea in the north and falling gradually inland. The landmass is divided into two main blocks.

    First is the Jebel Akhdar (called Irasa by the colonists), a plateau which extends along the coast from the Gulf of Sirte in the west to the Gulf of Timimi in the east, has no continuous coastal plain. Further eastwards along this strip, the land is almost entirely mountainous, and turns to desert. The Jebel Akhdar experiences a great deal of rainfall and has a climate comparable to other forested regions bordering the southern Mediterranean - hot, dry summers are moderated by mild, wet and rainy winters. An escarpment separates the coastal region from the interior plateau, which is level and covered with forest and shrub. Wheat and barley grow in abundance in patches of red soil on this plain and there is plenty of water issuing from highland springs.

    The southward slopes of the plateau are a transitional region, the climate becoming hotter and drier as you approach the great desert to the south. To the south and east is the lower Jebel el-Akabah, two highlands separated by a depression. This eastern region is much drier than the Jebel Akhdar, the Sahara extending to the coast. South of the coastal highlands of Cyrenaica is a large east-west running depression, extending eastward from the Gulf of Sirte into Egypt.


    The People, Society and Government

    The native peoples of Africa were referred to by the Greeks as “Libyans”, after the tribes of the Libu, a Berber people who inhabited north Africa. The Berber tribes of Kyrenaia, running from east to west are recorded as the Adyrmachidae, in the eastern area bordering with Egypt; the Gilligammae in the bulk of Marmarica; the Asbystae and Auschisae share Irasa with the Greeks of the Pentapolis, along with the smaller tribe of the Cabalians. To the immediate south and west of the Pentapolis are the numerous Nasamonians, bordering on the southern desert and lands of the Garamantians (whom Herodotus claims were not warlike and avoided contact). Further west still along the coast are others, the Macae, the Gindae, the Lotophagi, the Machlyans and the Auseans.

    While the Asbystae and Auschisae were largely settled and Hellenised, the other tribes were primarily nomadic hunter gatherers, living off their goats, camels and other livestock while hunting and gathering at the same time. Milk, meat, hides and wool were gathered from their livestock for food, tents and clothing. Ancient Egyptian sources describe Libyan men with long hair, braided and beaded, neatly parted from different sides and decorated with feathers attached to leather bands around the crown of the head while wearing thin robes of antelope hide, dyed and printed, crossing the shoulder and coming down until mid calf length to make a robe. Older men kept long braided beards. Women wore the same robes as men, plaited, decorated hair and both genders wore heavy jewelry. Weapons included, hatchets, spears and daggers. Herodotus says polygamy was common, oaths were sworn upon tombs of the revered dead, and divination was undertaken by dreaming while lying upon those same graves. Oaths were pledged between men by drinking out of each others’ hand. Sacrifices were made to the sun and moon, by breaking an animal’s neck, rather than cutting its throat.

    Agriculture was a major source of income for the region, producing barley, wheat, olive oil, wine, figs, apples, wool, sheep, cattle, and silphium. The last was a herb with medicinal values, which has since been farmed to extinction. Cyrene became one of the greatest intellectual and artistic centers of the Greek world, famous for its medical school, learned academies, and architecture, which included some of the finest examples of the Hellenistic style. The Cyrenaics, a school of thinkers who expounded a doctrine of moral cheerfulness that defined happiness as the sum of human pleasures, were founded by Aristippus of Cyrene. Other notable natives of Cyrene were the poet Callimachus, the philosopher Hegesias and the mathematicians Theodorus and Eratosthenes.

    Many Greeks settled in the Pentapolis. Each of the cities was ruled by its own king, with the basileus of Kyrene ruling over the whole. When their independence ended, they were ruled from Egypt, first by the Persians, then the Ptolemaic empire.


    History

    The founding of Kyrene is described in Herodotus’ Histories (part IV), when in 7th century BC, Greek immigrants from the island of Thera landed in the Gulf of Timimi. They stayed for several years in a place called Aziris, but their leader Aristoteles, on the advice of the god which inspired the original migration, moved the settlement westwards and founded Kyrene. He took the Libyan name Battos when he became king of Kyrenaia, founding the Battaid dynasty which ruled over Kyrenaia. Initially conflict with the native Libyans led to their sending an embassy to Egypt to request aid against the colonists, but the Egyptian army was defeated forcing conciliation.

    Later dynastic strife led to the founding of the city of Barca by dissidents against the second Battaid ruler, and later a war between Kyrene and Barca. Eventually an arbitrator was sought from Hellas, one Demonax of Arcadia, who reduced the power of the king. The heir, Arcesilaus, and his mother tried to seize power and when their coup failed, they fled to Samos and Cyprus. In Samos Arcesilaus gathered an army to retake Kyrene, and the sending to the oracle at Delphi was told that his family would hold power only for eight generations. He was warned not to attempt to extend their reign beyond this time, nor to punish those currently in power. He ignored the oracle, persecuted his enemies; some escaped but others fled into exile. He moved his court to Barca, but was assassinated in the forum by exiles.

    In the strife that followed, Kyrenaia was conquered by the Persians, who had recently taken Egypt in around 525BC. Alexander the Great received tribute from Kyrenaia in 332BC after his conquest of Egypt, with the region formally being annexed by Ptolemy shortly after securing his satrapy in 323BC. Kyrenaia briefly regained independence in 276BC under Ptolemy’s stepson, Magas of Kyrene. He attempted to seize all of Egypt, but was diverted by a Libyan rebellion at home. Eventually his daughter married Ptolemy III and Kyrenaia was reabsorbed into the Ptolemaic empire on his death in 250BC.

    In 163BC, in order to settle a disputed partition of the Ptolemaic holdings, Kyrenaia was separated from the kingdom and given to Ptolemy VIII. He passed it on to his son, Ptolemy Apion, who died without heirs in 96BC and bequeathed his kingdom to the Roman Republic. The exact territory Rome inherited was somewhat confused, but by 78BC it was organised into a province with Krete (Creta et Cyrenaica) and administered from Gortyn on Krete. It became a senatorial province, like Africa, in 20BC.


    Strategy

    Kyrenaia is sandwiched in between two powerful empires, Karthadast to the west and Ptolemaic Egypt to the east. It commands both the trade routes across the Sahara and rival sea lanes into the Mediterranean, making it a valuable prize. At the start of the game the province is nominally independent, under the rule of Ptolemy’s stepson. This makes it an obvious candidate for either of the two empires to seize, and is often the battleground between them. A third possibility is for a Greek faction to launch a naval expedition to take Kyrene (especially from Krete or Sicily), but while profitable it would earn the emnity of two powerful factions. If you were to take this gamble, you’d have to be prepared to content with powerful pikemen, heavy infantry, heavy cavalry and elephants of both.


    If that one is alright, I might provisionally look to do Krete next, though that's potentially massive given its long history.
    Last edited by QuintusSertorius; 05-08-2013 at 17:58.
    It began on seven hills - an EB 1.1 Romani AAR with historical house-rules (now ceased)
    Heirs to Lysimachos - an EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR with semi-historical houserules (now ceased)
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  24. #54
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I like it QuintusSertorius! Please also try your hand at Krete.

  25. #55
    EBII Hod Carrier Member QuintusSertorius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moros View Post
    I like it QuintusSertorius! Please also try your hand at Krete.
    I've started, hitting a strange issue with a paucity of information about Classical and Hellenistic Krete. I think it seems to be assumed as just part and parcel of wider Hellas.
    It began on seven hills - an EB 1.1 Romani AAR with historical house-rules (now ceased)
    Heirs to Lysimachos - an EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR with semi-historical houserules (now ceased)
    Philetairos' Gift - a second EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR


  26. #56

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    There's a rather old book by R.F. Willetts called "Ancient Crete: a social history from early times until the Roman occupation" (1965).
    "From Minoan Farmers to Roman Traders: Sidelights on the Economy of Ancient Crete" by Ángelos Chaniótis (1999) (http://books.google.be/books?id=wnI_...page&q&f=false). Overall, Chaniótis seems to be an expert on hellenistic Crete atm. If you know German you could check out "Das antike Kreta" by him (2004).
    Alternatively try Cavanagh, W. & Curtis, M. (eds.), "Post-Minoan Crete", 1998.
    Also, if you have access to JSTOR, you might try an article I found in a quick search by P. de Souza: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40960151.

    BTW this is going very fast, good work all of you. I wish I had more time to write one myself...

    BTW about the province 'Creta et Cyrenaica', there are indications that they were not organised as a single province (as contrary to Pontus et Bithynia or Cilicia et Cyprus) until quite late. See G. Perl, “Die römischen Provinzbeamten in Cyrenae und Creta zur Zeit der Republik”, Klio 52 (1970), 319-154 & 53 (1971), 369-379.
    Last edited by Ailfertes; 05-10-2013 at 09:39.

  27. #57
    ΤΑΞΙΑΡΧΟΣ Member kdrakak's Avatar
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    Attike is progressing fairly well but I am having trouble keeping it to a certain size. I was thinking about posting it as WIP get pointers and see where it goes from there. What do you guys think?
    -Silentium... mandata captate; non vos turbatis; ordinem servate; bando sequute; memo demittat bandum et inimicos seque;
    Parati!
    -Adiuta...
    -...DEUS!!!

    Completed EB Campaigns on VH/M: ALL... now working for EBII!

  28. #58
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Sure, we are happy to provide some direction/feedback where needed...
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
    perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna:
    quale per incertam lunam sub luce maligna
    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  29. #59
    EBII Hod Carrier Member QuintusSertorius's Avatar
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    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Ailfertes View Post
    There's a rather old book by R.F. Willetts called "Ancient Crete: a social history from early times until the Roman occupation" (1965).
    "From Minoan Farmers to Roman Traders: Sidelights on the Economy of Ancient Crete" by Ángelos Chaniótis (1999) (http://books.google.be/books?id=wnI_...page&q&f=false). Overall, Chaniótis seems to be an expert on hellenistic Crete atm. If you know German you could check out "Das antike Kreta" by him (2004).
    Alternatively try Cavanagh, W. & Curtis, M. (eds.), "Post-Minoan Crete", 1998.
    Also, if you have access to JSTOR, you might try an article I found in a quick search by P. de Souza: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40960151.

    BTW this is going very fast, good work all of you. I wish I had more time to write one myself...

    BTW about the province 'Creta et Cyrenaica', there are indications that they were not organised as a single province (as contrary to Pontus et Bithynia or Cilicia et Cyprus) until quite late. See G. Perl, “Die römischen Provinzbeamten in Cyrenae und Creta zur Zeit der Republik”, Klio 52 (1970), 319-154 & 53 (1971), 369-379.
    Thanks for those, I'll register on Jstor (no free access otherwise) and have a read. Can't get any of the others in my library's network.

    I'll try to finish Krete when I'm at work next week, as I did Kyrenaia.

    Considering a third once that's done, has the Bosporous been done? Or maybe Karia (perhaps I can only do provinces beginning with K!)?
    It began on seven hills - an EB 1.1 Romani AAR with historical house-rules (now ceased)
    Heirs to Lysimachos - an EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR with semi-historical houserules (now ceased)
    Philetairos' Gift - a second EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR


  30. #60

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Edit
    Last edited by I Am Herenow; 07-08-2017 at 12:41.

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