Page 1 of 18 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 514

Thread: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

  1. #1
    RABO! Member Brave Brave Sir Robin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Assaulting your flanks
    Posts
    1,475

    Default Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    As VT Marvin mentioned in the EB 2 Progress and the Community thread, help is needed on province descriptions, a task any amateur historian/writer can reasonably assume, with of course a slight bit of motivation. Therefore, I feel like it would be a good idea to devote a thread to this job and divvy out some work so we don't end up with duplicate work and move through the provinces quicker.

    These are the provinces that apparently need work:
    North Africa - basically all of them
    Persia - today's Iran, Pakistan
    Asia Minor and Caucasus - today's Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan
    Balkans - Thraikia Hypertera, Scorcouw, Dalmatia, Illyria Hellenike, Epeiros, Aitolia, Dardanoia, Makedonia, Thessalia, Attike, Lakonike, Krete

    Here is the map for specific region names and locations:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	eb22mapbig9lowres.jpg 
Views:	4648 
Size:	899.5 KB 
ID:	9126


    Here is Brennus' example of a province description, something that we should strive to emulate in form if possible.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Province: Combrogon

    Traveller's Log:
    North and west goes the traveller, towards the setting sun and into Combrogon. Combrogon is a land which differs in form as much as the flowers which burst from the soils in spring. In the south is a realm of mountains and forest, of terrain rugged as men who inhabit it, where winter snows land upon the hills like flocks of ice born birds, where magic haunts the hollows of trees and the gods smirk at men from within their watery realms. A land where one island, Mona, is known far and wide, where blood drips from the leaves and women, clad in shawls of night black cloth, scream up to the heavens in rage. This is the dark Combrogon, the Combrogon of the Ganganoi, the Dekeangloi and hammer wielding Ordouikes. To the north, in light Combrogen, among fields which roll like gentle waves, where ivy clad oaks stand guard against with the passing of the seasons, where ancient rivers roll into the ocean and their waters sail on to Iuverion, live others; the quiet Kornovoioi and, bowing their heads to their Brigantes overlords who rule this area, the recluse Karuetoioi and Setantoioi. In Combrogon the traveller will find no great towns, no great works to amaze the eyes. Dark Combrogon boasts no imperious state, although the Ordouikes are without doubt the dominant peoples, and even in light Combrogon, where the Brigantes dominate, it is hard to identify the trappings of power. Instead, Combrogon is home to one of the great sanctuaries of the gods. On Mona they assemble, the brooding, vapid, blessed, victory bringing, vengeful, benign gods, and gaze with pleasure at the sights they see before them.

    Geography

    Combrogon roughly equates to the modern regions of north Wales and Anglesey, Cheshire, Manchester, Merseyside, Lancashire and Cumbria. It is a land of varied geography. The core of Wales is composed of mountainous and upland terrain, which although rich in mineral deposits, is ill suited to arable farming. Along the coast and borders of Wales are lowland regions which can be used to grow crops. The regions of Combrogon which correspond to what is today Cheshire, Manchester, Merseyside and Lancashire are less dramatic; with fewer uplands and more spaces suitable for arable agriculture, especially around the Mersey valley. In the east the land rises to form the Pennine hills. In the north of Combrogon exists the mountainous Lake District, a region with very few low lying areas and almost totally unsuitable for arable farming. By virtue of being on the Atlantic coast, Combrogon enjoys warmer climates than its neighbouring region, Lagambrion, in the east; the warming Gulf Stream which flows in from the Atlantic providing a welcome source of heat. As with any region of northern Albion, Combrogon also enjoys a reliable rain supply, although there is increased rainfall in the mountainous regions. Within the low lying regions of Combrogon it is likely that much of the ancient forests had been cleared by the time of the Iron Age, however in the upland regions of Wales and Cumbria large forests no doubt existed, as they do today. The clearance of forests would also have affected the fauna of this region. In those regions with forests and less accessible terrain, populations of wolves, deer, boar and possibly even bear would have continued to exist. The lowland regions, with their open landscape, would have supported a greater population of smaller animals, in particular rodents and birds, and the small and medium sized carnivores which prey upon them. The coastline, lakes of Cumbria and River Mersey would also have provided the inhabitants of Combrogon with the opportunity to catch a variety of marine species.

    The People, Society and Government

    The people who inhabited Combrogon lived in societies which, based on the archaeological record, were not subject to the sort of radical change which occurred in the south east of the island. Within north Wales many of the settlements appear to have been first occupied in the middle Iron Age, although some were occupied in the early Iron Age, and continued to be occupied after the Roman conquest. Settlements in this region typically took on the form of a defended homestead. Some, such as examples from Castell Odo and Dinas Emrys, resembled the raths of southern Wales; a family sized settlement with enclosing earthwork and, occasionally, palisade. Others, such as an example from Bryn Eryr and many others from Anglesey, were enclosed by a rectilinear bank and ditch and have been interpreted as elite residences. Furthermore some, such as Bryn Y Castell, employed surrounding stone walls around a single hut, whilst another type of settlement tended to involve two houses which were associated with a nearby field system. In addition to this hilltop enclosures also existed in north Wales. Examples from Garn Boduan, Tre'r Ceiri and the Conwy Mountains have been found to contain sufficient numbers of stone walled huts to house 100 to 400 individuals. Typically these hill top enclosures were surrounded by stone walls although they occasionally made use of cliff faces instead.

    The thin lowland strip which exists between the mountains and sea in north Wales was heavily settled during the Iron Age. Spindle whorls, excavations such as those at the site of Dinorben, and a lack of mulivallate enclosures (multivallation typically occurs in areas where cattle dominate the economy) in northern Wales indicate that sheep were the preferred livestock. Grain was also grown in the region, as evidenced by saddle querns from Dinorben and the Conwy Mountains. On the isle of Anglesey, known as Mona to the Romans, emmer and spelt were grown, and extensive pasture existed. Although the settlements described above fit well within this model of mixed agriculture, it is unclear (due to a lack of excavation) what role the hill top enclosures played; they may have served as permanent residences, as seasonal gathering points or, less likely, as refuges in times of strife. An additional mystery is at what point the druidic sanctuary on Mona developed. As with so many aspects of Iron Age religion it is hard to detect in the archaeological record. However the sanctuary appears to have been important across much of Britain and, from inferences by Caesar, on the continent as well.

    In northern Combrogon there has been only limited study of the archaeological record. One of the reasons for this is that the region was heavily industrialised in the 18th and 19th centuries, thus destroying much of the evidence. What little has been studied shows that hillforts were occupied from the early Iron Age until about the 4th century BC, after which time they fell out of use; a pattern mirrored in the lands to the east of the Pennines. Enclosures also existed across the lowlands, although our knowledge of these is still limited. Across the whole of Combrogon neither iron currency bars nor coinage were adopted and what limited pottery was produced is usually crude and of limited use in establishing chronologies.

    History

    At the point at which Combrogon entered history, in Tacitus' Agricola and Ptolemy's Geographica, the region was inhabited by a number of tribes. In what is today Wales there existed the Dekeangloi, Ganganoi and, most powerful among them, the Ordouikes. To the north, in modern day Cheshire and the Mersey valley, lived the Kornouoioi, whilst in Cumbria were the Setantoioi and Caruetoio, clients of the Brigantes. Having been little exposed to the urbanising or social changes which the south eastern tribes had experienced, as a result of their proximity to Roman Gaul, the tribes of Combrogon lacked the centralised society and desire for Mediterranean goods which would have made them easy to incorporate into the empire. Instead, the Romans initially intended to leave this region and its tribes outside of their new British province.

    This all changed, however, when the leader of the British resistance to Roman rule, Karatakos, having fled from his own people, the Katuuellanoi, rallied first the Silures, in Belerion, and then the Ordouikes. Having waged a successful guerrilla campaign against the Roman governor, Publius Ostorius Scapula, Karatakos decided to gamble his success on a set piece battle at Caer Caradoc in AD 50, enlisting the assistance of the Ordouikes. Although the forces of Karatakos enjoyed an advantageous position, atop a hillfort which had recently been refortified, the Romans succeeded in routing the Britons after fierce fighting and moderate losses. Despite the defeat, and later capture of Karatakos, the Ordouikes remained openly opposed to Rome, no doubt encouraged by the successes enjoyed by the Silures against legions in the south of Wales.

    The continued aggression of the Ordouikes and Silures caused the Romans to launch a new campaign in AD 58 under the command of Quintus Veranius. By AD 59 the Romans had fought their way into the lands of the Ordouikes, this time under the command of the brutal and determined Suetonius Paullinus. Having overcome the resistance of the Ordouikes, Paullinus attacked the sacred isle of Mona, arguably the most important druidic centre in all of Alba. Confronting the Romans as they prepared their assault on the island was a terrifying site as "The enemy lined the shore in a dense armed mass. Among them were black robed women with dishevelled hair like the Furies, brandishing torches. Nearby stood the Druids, raising their hands to heaven and screaming dreadful curses." as Tacitus described it. Despite this blood chilling sight, the Romans stormed the sanctuary and, as Tacitus puts it, destroyed "the groves devoted to Mona's barbarous superstitions". The campaign of Paullinus, however, did not destroy the ability of the Ordouikes to defy Roman rule and in c.AD 70 they rebelled against Roman occupation and destroyed a Roman cavalry squadron. Between AD 74 and 77 Julius Frontinus campaigned against both the Ordouikes and Silures and, despite many setbacks, enjoyed enough success that the following year Julius Agricola was able to decisively defeat the Ordouikes. Tacitus reports that Agricola exterminated the Ordouikes, although this seems unlikely considering the rugged terrain of northern Wales and the decentralised nature of Ordouikes settlement.

    By contrast, throughout this period, there is no mention of the other tribes of Combrogon opposing Rome. The Dekeangloi and Ganganoi may have been clients of the Ordouikes, and thus served alongside them, or they may have been like the Demetae to the south and offered no resistance to the Romans. Likewise the Kornouoioi appear to have offered no resistance and the Romans adapted their tribal capital into the new settlement of Virconium whilst stationing a legion at Deva (modern day Chester). Further north the history of Setantoioi and Caruetoio is bound up with that of the Brigantes, and it is impossible to know if they were one of the pro-Roman or anti-Roman factions which existed in the great northern kingdom.

    Strategy
    Although this province is not the most profitable it's rugged landscape makes it easy to defend (and hard conquer). The main virtue of this region, however, is the existence of the druidic sanctuary on Mona, possession of which provides a player will some powerful benefits...

    * * * * * province description ends here * * * * *


    And here is the formatting the team would like you to use when you submit your description:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    <h>Traveller's Log</h>
    <p>
    </p>
    <h>Geography</h>
    <p>
    </p>
    <h>People, Society, and Government</h>
    <p>
    </p>
    <h>History</h>
    <p>
    </p>
    <h>Strategy</h>
    <p>
    </p>

    Please no "\n"s. The reason being we use an XML format rather than the standard TXT format. Please break each paragraph up using the <p></p> tags (just like in HTML).


    Now come on, keep them coming!

    Basically, name a province and I'll assign your name to it. Please don't select one if you don't plan on following up. If, for whatever reason, you start and cannot finish for whatever reason, please post here and I can remove your name. I'll start off by selecting a province:

    Hyrkania, Parthyaia: Brave Sir Robin
    Mysia, Lydia, Ionia, Bithynia: Arjos
    Attike, Makedonia: Kdrakak
    Kyrenaia, Krete: Quintus Sertorius
    Rus Lixus, Mauretania: Lowenklee
    Paphlagonia: Ptolemaios
    Epeiros: Ca Putt
    Di'amat: Tuuvi
    Aitolia: Spade
    Gaetulia: Friendly Sword
    Thessaly: Evocata
    Kilikia: The Irate Pirate
    Gedrosia: Zastrow
    Persis: Rex Somnorum

    Note to everyone (but especially those who need to review the work done so far): I've hyperlinked those provinces that have been at least drafted, if not completed, to their corresponding post. That should help tidy this up a bit.

    *****************************************************
    Updated Province Descriptions status list:

    Last update: 04/30/2014.

    To Do = No evidence that work has begun: 94/198 (49%)
    WIP = Being developed in a thread, but not complete: 13/198 (6%)
    waiting grammatical check: 9/198 (5%)
    Done = Finished but not put into the game: 0/198 (0%)
    Inserted = Put into the game, but may still need work: 82/198 (40%)


    Provinces Descriptions Status:


    Britain

    01. Iuerion: Inserted. Here
    02. Kaledonon: Inserted. Here
    03. Combrogon: Inserted. Here
    04. Legāmbrion: Inserted. Here
    05. Belerion: Inserted. Here
    06. Arduon: Inserted. Here
    07. Albion: Inserted. Here
    08. Kantion: Inserted. Here


    Iberia

    09. Callaecia: Inserted
    10. Lusitania: Inserted (Description calls it Lusitania-Vettonia)
    11. Turdulia: Inserted
    12. Turdetania: To Do
    13. Bastetania: To Do
    14. Carpetania: Inserted
    15. Celtiberia: Inserted
    16. Asturia-Kantabria: Inserted (Description calls it Asturia)
    17. Ilergetia: Inserted
    18. Edetania: Inserted
    19. Lacetania: Inserted
    50. Baleares: Inserted Here


    Gaul

    20. Armorikos: To Do
    21. Ikoranda Piktonis: To Do
    22. Akuitanon: To Do
    23. Ikoranda Uolkias: To Do
    24. Aruernselua: To Do
    25. Uidobiturigeis: To Do
    26. Brogi Aulerikoi: To Do
    27. Eturomina: Done Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    28. Akitosekuanoi: To Do
    29. Etusegusauoi: To Do
    30. Uidi Saluuioi: To Do
    31. Insubrabrog: Inserted Here
    32. Raition: Done Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    33. Nikron: To Do (Description calls it Vindelicos)
    34. Landa Pelignoi: To Do (Description calls it Nervaea Belgae)
    35. Liguria: To Do
    36. Venetia: To Do
    37. Landadexsiuo Bouiroi: Done Here
    71. Talaallobrogis: To Do
    71. Uidu Teuto Ikoranda: To Do (Description calls it Noricae)
    111. Talaeduoi: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)


    Italia

    38. Etruria: To Do
    39. Umbria: To Do
    40. Latium: Inserted. Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    41. Apulia: Inserted ("Description", "Geography", "History", and "Strategy" sections empty)
    42. Campania: To Do
    43. Brettia: To Do
    44. Kalabria: Inserted. Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    45. Elimya: To Do (Sicily)
    46. Sicilia: To Do (Sicily)
    47. Trinakrie: To Do (Sicily)
    48. Korsim: WIP (Corsica) Here
    49. Sardin: WIP (Sardinia) Here


    Great Germania

    Note that for Great Germania supplementary information is in the original thread Here

    51. Herkunion: Inserted Here
    52. Raurikon: WIP Here (Description calls it Heruskolandam)
    53. Moenon: WIP Here (Description calls it Mrog Arctagone)
    54. Boiotergion: Inserted Here
    55. Ālfheaim: Inserted Here (Description calls it Albihoimoz) ("Description", "Geography", "History", and "Strategy" sections empty)
    56. Ingaevon: Inserted Here ("Description", "Geography", "History", and "Strategy" sections empty)
    57. Skanelendo: Inserted Here ("Description", "Geography", "History", and "Strategy" sections empty)
    59. Duron: WIP Here (Description calls it Rugolandam)
    60. Widura: waiting grammatical check. Here (Description calls it Silengolandam)
    61. Pomera: Inserted Here
    62. Luguwa: Inserted Here
    63. Kottinon: waiting grammatical check. Here


    Central/East Europe

    64. Alazonea: Inserted Here
    65. Budinja: Inserted Here
    66. Ăstuwa: Inserted Here
    67. Neurja: Inserted Here
    69. Gelonja: Inserted Here
    73. Pannonia Illyrica: To Do
    74. Etunorikoi: To Do
    75. Eravacouw: To Do
    76. Getia Koile: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    77. Getia: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    78. Mikra Skythia: Inserted Here (Description calls it Mykra Scythia) ("Strategy" section empty)
    79. Thraikia Hypertera: To Do
    80. Landa Skordiskoi: To Do (Description calls it Scorcouw)
    81. Dalmatia: To Do
    92. Wenetwa: Inserted Here


    Greece

    82. Illyria Hellenike: To Do
    83. Epeiros: To Do
    84. Aitolia: Inserted Here
    85. Dardanoia: To Do
    86. Makedonia: Inserted Here
    87. Thessalia: Inserted Here ("History" & "Strategy" sections empty)
    88. Attike: Inserted Here
    89. Peloponnesos: Inserted ("Description", "Geography", "History", and "Strategy" sections empty)
    90. Lakonike: WIP Here
    91. Krete: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    93. Rhodos: Inserted Here
    94. Odrysai: To Do
    95. Chersonesos Thraikia: To Do


    Anatolia

    96. Bithynia: Inserted Here
    97. Mysia: Inserted Here
    98. Ionia: Inserted Here
    99. Lydia: Inserted Here
    100. Karia: Inserted Here
    101. Pamphylia: Inserted Here
    102. Phrygia: Inserted Here
    103. Galatia: Inserted Here
    104. Kappadokia Pontika: Inserted Here
    105. Paphlagonia: WIP Here
    106. Pontos Paralios: Inserted Here
    107. Kappadokia: Inserted Here
    108. Kilikia: To Do
    109. Pokr Hayk: Inserted Here
    117. Kypros: Inserted Here


    Caucasus

    112. Kartli: Inserted Here
    113. Aghvank: To Do
    114. Hayasdan: Inserted Here
    115. Adurbadegan: To Do
    116. Sophene: Inserted Here


    Black Sea Provinces

    70. Skythia Borysthenes : To Do
    110. Egrisi: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    161. Taurike Chersonesos: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    162. Bosporion Tyrannesis: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    177. Skythia: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)


    Near East & Mesopotamia:

    118. Syria: Inserted Here
    119. Syria Koile: WIP Here
    120. Assyrie: To Do
    121. Adiabene: To Do
    122. Mesopotamia: waiting grammatical check. Here
    123. Babylonia: waiting grammatical check. Here
    124. Media: To Do
    125. Elymais: WIP Here
    126. Characene: To Do
    188. Syria kai Phoinike: Inserted Here


    Persia & India:

    58. Trinakarta: To Do (Description calls it Auwjogotanoz - must have been a German province originally)
    127. Persis: Inserted Here
    128. Gabiene: To Do
    129. Khoarene: To Do
    130. Hyrkania: Inserted
    131. Astauene: To Do
    132. Parthyaia: To Do
    134. Areia: waiting grammatical check. Here
    135. Drangiane: To Do
    136. Karmania: Inserted Here
    137. Gedrosia: To Do
    138. Hauravatish: To Do
    139. Paropamisadai: To Do
    144. Gandhara: To Do
    145. Saptasindavah: To Do
    146. Sauvira: To Do
    156. Saurashtra: To Do
    187. Media Rhagiana: To Do


    Central Asia Provinces

    68. Oxeiana: waiting grammatical check. Here
    133. Margiane: To Do
    140. Baktria: waiting grammatical check Here
    141. Sogdiana: waiting grammatical check. Here
    142. Dayuan: To Do
    143. Dahyu Haomavarga: To Do


    Steppe Provinces

    147. Xiyu: To Do
    148. Sai Yavuga: To Do
    149. Kangha: To Do
    150. Saka Yabgu: To Do
    151. Dahyu Alanna: To Do
    152. Dahyu Mazsakata: WIP Here
    153. Huwarazmish: To Do
    154. Dahyu Daha: To Do
    155. Dahyu Aursa: To Do
    158. Dahyu Roxsalanna: To Do
    159. Dahyu Yazyga: To Do
    160. Maeotis: To Do
    181. Dahyu Siraca: To Do


    Africa

    163. Mauretania Tingitania: To Do
    164. Mauretania: Inserted ("Strategy" section empty)
    165. Mauretania Massaesili: To Do
    166. Mashiliem: To Do
    167. Numidia: To Do
    168. Gaetulia: Inserted Here
    169. Atiqa: WIP Here
    170. Zeugitana: Inserted Here (Description calls it Zeugei)
    171. Byzacena: To Do
    172. Phasania: To Do
    173. Syrthim: To Do
    174. Kyreneia: Inserted Here
    175. Numidia Massylii: To Do
    176. Libye: To Do
    178. Delta Neilou: Inserted Here
    179. Heptanomis: Inserted Here
    180. Theba´s: Inserted Here
    182. Oasis Megale: To Do
    183. Triakontaschoinos: To Do
    184. Kush: Inserted Here
    185. Erythraia: To Do
    186. Di'amat: To Do (Has a very short "trade resources" description in-game)
    199. Eremos: No building


    Arabia

    157. Lihyan: Inserted
    189. Edum: Inserted
    190. Aram: To Do
    191. Hawran: WIP Here
    192. Ma'in: Province will be changed, do not write
    193. Saba: To Do
    194. Qataban: To Do
    195. Hadramawt: To Do
    196. Shisur: Province will be removed, do note write
    197. Maka: Inserted Here ("Strategy" section empty)
    198. Gerrhaia Arabia: To Do
    Last edited by joshmahurin; 05-15-2015 at 20:56. Reason: Added prefered formatting
    From Frontline for fixing siege towers of death
    x30 From mikepettytw for showing how to edit in game text.
    From Brennus for wit.

    Members thankful for this post (9):

    + Show/Hide List



  2. #2
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,419

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    If you have some questions or something let us know.

  3. #3
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Flatout Minigame Champion Arjos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Prisoners upon this rock, flying without wings...
    Posts
    8,909

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I already started writing Mysia, but I do have a question: are we to follow strictly EBII's boundaries? Or the historical ones? For example Lydia has a strip of land, with a port (should be Phokaia, although with the limited space it could be Smyrne, which is even further south) that supposedly was the boundary between Ionia and Aiolis (by extention Mysia). So in such cases, what would you prefer us to do?

    On the same line, what about islands like Tenedos, Lesbos and Imbros? Are they to be included in other provinces? (I think Lesbos in-game is part of Ionia) Or should I add them to Mysia?
    Last edited by Arjos; 05-02-2013 at 06:47.

    Member thankful for this post:



  4. #4
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Korieltauuon.
    Posts
    7,178

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Good point Arjos. I have had a similar problem when writing for the Pritanoi descriptions, for example the souther provinces of Albion and Kornouoi split the historical tribe, the Dumnonoii, between them, thus making it a little tricky to write about this tribes history.

    My advice is to write for the EBII region, however, as you will no doubt go outside of the province boundaries make a note of this. For example, in discussing Iueroi (the north Irish province) I have made a note in my description that the culture and history sections pertain to the island of Ireland as a whole, even though the southern part is Eremos.



    donated by ARCHIPPOS for being friendly to new people.
    donated by Macilrille for wit.
    donated by stratigos vasilios for starting new and interesting threads
    donated by Tellos Athenaios as a welcome to Campus Martius


  5. #5
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    In the middle of the Desert.
    Posts
    2,052

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Arjos View Post
    On the same line, what about islands like Tenedos, Lesbos and Imbros? Are they to be included in other provinces? (I think Lesbos in-game is part of Ionia) Or should I add them to Mysia?
    To what Brennus has said I would only say that if the discussion of the islands is relevant to the history of the region writ large then include them. Even if they are strictly a part of another EB II region, we all understand that boundaries and relationships between communities change over time.
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
    perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna:
    quale per incertam lunam sub luce maligna
    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  6. #6
    ΤΑΞΙΑΡΧΟΣ Member kdrakak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I'd be willing to try Attike. I am not a historian or a writer, but I 'll give it a go. I'd love to contribute.
    -Silentium... mandata captate; non vos turbatis; ordinem servate; bando sequute; memo demittat bandum et inimicos seque;
    Parati!
    -Adiuta...
    -...DEUS!!!

    Completed EB Campaigns on VH/M: ALL... now working for EBII!

    Members thankful for this post (5):



  7. #7
    JEBMMP Creator & AtB Maker Member jirisys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    In the town where I was born.
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Landa Pelignoi:
    Grassy flatlands.

    There. Does that work?

    I wish I could help, but time is not something I have enough of. I'm a slow writer as well.

    P.S. The new regions look nice.

    ~Jirisys ()
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Because we all need to compensate...

    Member thankful for this post:



  8. #8
    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Directing the defence of Boiotergion
    Posts
    3,355

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by jirisys View Post
    Landa Pelignoi:
    Grassy flatlands.

    There. Does that work?
    Yep! We need that one too!

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Member Member Tuuvi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    The wild west
    Posts
    1,346

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I call dibs on Di'amat, I'd like to learn more about ancient Ethiopia

    Members thankful for this post (4):



  10. #10

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I'd do Epeiros.

    Members thankful for this post (4):



  11. #11
    Member Member Ptolemaios's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Colonia Agrippina
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I could do Paphlagonia, if it isn┤t already taken. I┤m no native speaker, but I will do my best.

    Members thankful for this post (4):



  12. #12
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Korieltauuon.
    Posts
    7,178

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I will do the British Isles and missing parts of Gaul and Central Europe

    Thanks for volunteering do these guys!



    donated by ARCHIPPOS for being friendly to new people.
    donated by Macilrille for wit.
    donated by stratigos vasilios for starting new and interesting threads
    donated by Tellos Athenaios as a welcome to Campus Martius


  13. #13
    ΤΑΞΙΑΡΧΟΣ Member kdrakak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Is there a deadline of any sort?
    -Silentium... mandata captate; non vos turbatis; ordinem servate; bando sequute; memo demittat bandum et inimicos seque;
    Parati!
    -Adiuta...
    -...DEUS!!!

    Completed EB Campaigns on VH/M: ALL... now working for EBII!

  14. #14
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Korieltauuon.
    Posts
    7,178

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    As soon as possible, but as you have seen those of us in the team don't exactly do deadlines.



    donated by ARCHIPPOS for being friendly to new people.
    donated by Macilrille for wit.
    donated by stratigos vasilios for starting new and interesting threads
    donated by Tellos Athenaios as a welcome to Campus Martius


  15. #15

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by kdrakak View Post
    Is there a deadline of any sort?
    if you can┤t have it done in 3 months then you shouldn┤t even try it imho thats why i don┤t volunteer i┤ve begun a career as a school teacher and since i can┤t afford internet at home i wouldn┤t have time sadly altough i can read fluently spanish english and portuguese and roughly french and italian (and very very very very litle german) if i had the time i could just read books and sumarise a few of them in english for the future use of the team particulary in languages such as catalan portuguese and spanish wich most people won┤t understand in their original writting but still posses alot of valuable informations

  16. #16
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,419

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Considering North Africa:
    Zeugei, Shardin et Korsim, Muxsi, Atiqa, Barbagia, Delta Neilou, Heptanomis and Theba´s have already been completed or have already been worked on.

  17. #17
    EBII Hod Carrier Member QuintusSertorius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    18,731

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    This is an absolutely awesome idea, something I feel like I can meaningfully contribute to, since it's just amateur historian work. I can write reasonably well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moros View Post
    Considering North Africa:
    Zeugei, Shardin et Korsim, Muxsi, Atiqa, Barbagia, Delta Neilou, Heptanomis and Theba´s have already been completed or have already been worked on.
    I note that Kyrenaia isn't on that list, so could I be added to the list for that province, please? I'll have a stab while I'm at work next week and see how I go. I'm quite interested in the provinces that have prominent Greek colonies in them, so if that goes well I might have a go at some others.

    Is Kypros part of "North Africa" for the purposes of that classification? It's one of the few places besides Rhodos that I've actually been to in the Mediterranean, my sister lives there too. So if Kyrenaia goes well that might be my second.
    Last edited by QuintusSertorius; 05-04-2013 at 00:13.
    It began on seven hills - an EB 1.1 Romani AAR with historical house-rules (now ceased)
    Heirs to Lysimachos - an EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR with semi-historical houserules (now ceased)
    Philetairos' Gift - a second EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR

    Members thankful for this post (3):



  18. #18
    Tribunus Plebis Member Gaius Scribonius Curio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    In the middle of the Desert.
    Posts
    2,052

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Kypros is classified as Anatolia: unfortunately it already has a description. Kyrenaia does not, however, so good luck...
    Nihil nobis metuendum est, praeter metum ipsum. - Caesar
    We have not to fear anything, except fear itself.



    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram
    perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna:
    quale per incertam lunam sub luce maligna
    est iter in silvis, ubi caelum condidit umbra
    Iuppiter, et rebus nox abstulit atra colorem.
    - Vergil

  19. #19
    gourmand of carrot juices Member Lowenklee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    I'll help.

    Consider me for Rus Lixus and Mauretania.

    Members thankful for this post (2):



  20. #20
    EBII Hod Carrier Member QuintusSertorius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    18,731

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius Scribonius Curio View Post
    Kypros is classified as Anatolia: unfortunately it already has a description. Kyrenaia does not, however, so good luck...
    Nothing unfortunate in work already being complete! I'll focus on Kyrenaia and see where I am when it's done.
    It began on seven hills - an EB 1.1 Romani AAR with historical house-rules (now ceased)
    Heirs to Lysimachos - an EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR with semi-historical houserules (now ceased)
    Philetairos' Gift - a second EB 1.1 Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR

    Member thankful for this post:



  21. #21
    RABO! Member Brave Brave Sir Robin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Assaulting your flanks
    Posts
    1,475

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    General question for the team. When we do finish on a province, how would you like us to make you aware/let you look it over for the ok, suggestions, etc?
    From Frontline for fixing siege towers of death
    x30 From mikepettytw for showing how to edit in game text.
    From Brennus for wit.

  22. #22
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,419

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    You can post it here and use the mention function possibly, that way we'll get attention. Or you could also pm us. We might not notice it if it was just posted here.

  23. #23
    ΤΑΞΙΑΡΧΟΣ Member kdrakak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Brennus' history section of the description does not stop at "pre-Roman" times (around 273BC), but perhaps it does at roughly 14AD which I think is the end of the game's time-frame. Is there a guideline? What would you guys think should be the stopping point for the history section?
    -Silentium... mandata captate; non vos turbatis; ordinem servate; bando sequute; memo demittat bandum et inimicos seque;
    Parati!
    -Adiuta...
    -...DEUS!!!

    Completed EB Campaigns on VH/M: ALL... now working for EBII!

  24. #24
    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Korieltauuon.
    Posts
    7,178

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    If you can stop at AD14 that would be nice. Unfortunately all the British provinces go past AD14 as there is no history for Britain, except for Caesar's two invasions of the south east and the fragments of information which exist from Pytheas and Poseidonius. So ideally stop at AD14, if you have to (as I did) go a little further into the 1st century AD, but don't go into the 2nd century AD.

    ALso, in the people, culture, society part, feel free to begin before 272BC if the archaeological evidence allows it, just don't become too excessive



    donated by ARCHIPPOS for being friendly to new people.
    donated by Macilrille for wit.
    donated by stratigos vasilios for starting new and interesting threads
    donated by Tellos Athenaios as a welcome to Campus Martius


  25. #25
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Flatout Minigame Champion Arjos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Prisoners upon this rock, flying without wings...
    Posts
    8,909

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Quote Originally Posted by Brennus View Post
    just don't become too excessive
    You say that and I kept on thinking it, but I just couldn't decide what to cut lol
    I'll let the team make that decision XD

    Mysia submitted, let me recharge my batteries and I'll start working on Lydia ^^

    Edit: As per JMRC's request, I'm posting Mysia, so the EBII team's historians can review it. As a note, there's a reassessment of Eumenes I's reign (based on "Attalid Asia Minor: Money, International Relations, and the State"), let me know whether you are going to accept or decline it. If the latter I'll rewrite it. Overall, it badly needs to be reduced :P

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Province: Mysia

    Traveller's Log

    Heading ashore, the traveller finds himself in epic land, of which Homeros sang about. In the vicinity is Mount Ide, so named by the Teukroi of Krete, in search of a new home. So rich and fertile, even the Dodekatheon (Twelve Olympians) took many-fountained Ide, mother of wild beasts, as their residence, watching over the deeds of men. The region north of the River Hermos and west of the River Rhyndakos, today is called Mysia. Inhabited by many people, both in the present and in the past, it has been divided into five regions: Megale Mysia, Mikra Mysia, Troas, Aiolis and Teuthrania. Starting in Troas, where the main port for Mysia is found. It was renamed, by Basileus Lysimachos of Thraikia, as Alexandreia Troas. Straight to the south, overlooking Cape Lekton, the westernmost point of Asia, is Hamaxitos. A polis famous for the temple of Apollon Smintheos and the nearby salt pans. Little further inland, there is the polis of Skepsis, where Neleus has bequeathed his scholarches' library (Aristoteles and Theophrastos). To the south on the coast, live the Aioleis and the Peleges. Where Assos is located, a naturally strong and well-fortified polis, famous for its excellent wheat. It used to be a possession of the Tyrant Hermias, a pupil of Platon, who inviting philosophers to join him, brought much prosperity. Continuing eastward, as the adramyttene gulf becomes apparent, lays its namesake polis of Adramyttion. The latter is called the Lydian Gate, for the Lydoi are said to have founded it, but today it belongs to the Mysoi. Striking South, in what can now be called Aiolis, crossing the Kaikos river there is the seaport of Elaia. Which extends its influence across the Hydra and Harmatos Promontories, in what has come to be known as the elaitic gulf. Recently being used by Philetairos of Pergamon, as his link to the Aigaion Pelagos (Aegean Sea). But the largest polis in the area is Kyme, becoming metropolis (mother city) for the rest of the cities, about thirty in number, of which not a few have disappeared. At the same time, incredibly, Kyme hasn't exacted harbour taxes on any ship making port for some three hundred years, becoming something of a mockery for the nearby locals. The inhabitans got the reputation, therefore, of being a people who learnt late that they were living in a city by the sea. Following the coast westward, stands Phokaia, a Ionian polis, founded on land bought from Kyme. It marks the end of Aiolis, for now following the River Hermos inland stands Teuthrania, the Mysian Kingdom's core of the Age of Heroes. To the East Mount Temnon splits Mysia in half and it forms the boundary with Lydia and Phrygia. While to the North is Megale Mysia, with its capital Pergamon. Although part of the Arche Seleukeia, this polis has enjoyed substantial autonomy and is steadily growing in influence. Thanks to its formidable defensive position, since the time of Antigonos Monophthalmos, it became the seat of substantial treasuries. Outside of it can be found an Asklepieion, where one can bathe in its springs and receive the god's wisdom about how to heal his afflictions. Locals are even starting to call this land Mysia Pergamene. To the North-East, passing marshes and forests, in what is now Mikra Mysia, the country opens again revealing Lake Apolloniatis, with abundant fish, but most of all Mount Olympos. Overlooking trade routes to the neighbouring regions, unfortunately it is often an haven for robbers. Turning westward in sight of the Propontis Sea, stands the formidable island-polis of Kyzikos, commercially indispensable, it is becoming ever closer to Pergamon. This because Philetairos offered, much needed, assistance against the invading Galatai. Fording the Aisepos and Grenikos Rivers, the latter of Alexandros Megas' fame, the traveller is back in Troas. This country possesses highly praised vineyards, which are the cause of much strife between the poleis of Priapos and Parion, arbitrated obviously by Pergamon. Far more important, due to their control of the Hellespontos, are the poleis of Lampsakos and Abydos. These were garrisoned by seleukid order, again Pergamon took the opportunity for expanding its grip over Mysia. Moving on southwards Ilion can be found, it used to be a mere village, but Alexandros Megas, who visited its temple of Athena, rewarded it the status of polis, exempted it from tribute and ordered its buildings to be improved.

    Geography

    Mysia for the greater part is a mountainous country, with many rivers, though most of them are small and not navigable. Thus it holds a large supply of water, which helps to mitigate its humid and hot summers. In contrast the Aeolian Coast is much drier, but both areas experience wet and snowy winters. Overall its soil was praised as the finest and richest of Asia, being well stocked with cattle and plains appropriate for pasturage. The interior, in the North-East, is studded by many lakes and confluent rivers. Throughout history, these have changed courses or tributaries have become the main stem, shaping a new image of the region. This has made it difficult for historians, ancient and modern alike, to precisely pinpoint locations. Ida is particular in itself, with its gentler slopes it is proper to consider it a region, instead of a single mountain. Covering an area from Cape Baba (ancient Lekton), to Aphnitis (a swamp or lake, of uncertain exact location) in the lake district. Etymologically, Mysia, is thought to derive from the Lydian word for beech (mysos), which is common in the region. This has been linked to the "maesia silva", a forest belonging to Etruscan Veii. The mountains, forests and waters are home to a myriad of animals. From the Gediz (ancient Hermos) Delta towards the interior live migratory or indigenous birds like Dalmatian pelicans, owls, heron, nightingales, ducks and flamingos. The Sea of Marmara had several oyster beds, excellent were those of Kyzikos. According to Gaivs Plinivs Secvndvs (Pliny the Elder), these were larger, fresher and tastier. Of note, historically speaking, are also edible dormice and mice, these according to the Teucrian Myth, overran the settlers' camp. Fulfilling the oracle's words to build "where the earth-born should attack them".

    The People, Society and Government

    The Mysoi (Mysians), according to Xenophon, dwelled in "many prosperous and substantial towns". Recorded to have partecipated at Marathon wearing "on their heads their native helmets, carrying small shields and javelins hardened by fire."; highly independent (even though, they still participated in a regular tribute of 500 talents), they sometimes raided in Persian land, prompting a military response by Farnavaz (Pharnabazus), employing "magnificently equipped" Greek mercenaries. The image that has come down to us, is one of proud people, respecting strength, naturally providing military manpower to the greater powers of Mikra Asia. They don't appear to have possessed any large central capital/city, but instead were dispersed in several settlements, tending their livestock and crops. A dedication to Eumenes II and his family, by a "Hegemon of the Mysians" seems to indicate a leading figure, holding military power. However such authority, only extended over the corresponding tribe. Typical of the Mysoi was a flute, particularly apt for sorrowful tunes, used at funerals. They employed music and dancing to accompany ceremonies and feasts. Xenophon records that "a Mysian came in carrying a light shield in each hand, and at one moment in his dance he would go through a pantomime as though two men were arrayed against him, again he would use his shields as though against one antagonist, and again he would whirl and throw somersaults while holding the shields in his hands, so that the spectacle was a fine one.".

    The Aioleis (Aeolians) migrated eastward, during the Bronze Age collapse, from Thessalia. They then heavily settled the island of Lebsos, which became a metropolis for new colonies in Asia and even Aigyptos. Originally governed by kings, in the 7th century BCE, many were replaced by oligarchies and tyrants. Concerned mainly with farming, twelve of the most important colonies united in a league (Dodekapolis), competing against the Ionian poleis. Unfortunately they couldn't withstand the expanding powers from the east, during the subsequent centuries and ever since have provided naval bases and experties.

    The Dardanoi (Dardanians) represent Troas' inhabitants. These people were the synthesis of Balkan-Danubian Bronze Age people, Hittito-Luwian speakers and all the newcomers post-Bronze Age collapse (Leleges, Pelasgoi and the Phrygian-Mysian migrants). They stood, literally, at the crossroads of East and West. Constantly dealing with passing armies and incoming conquerors, these people developed their own local loyalties and so recognized themselves by their cities, legends and myths. A somewhat widespread phenomenon, was the worship of Priapos, fertility god and protector of livestock, fruits and mercantile activity. For these were the activities of the area, which assumed the role of an economic hub with commercial harbours, storage facilities, processing for raw materials and markets.
    Last edited by Arjos; 07-30-2013 at 16:39.

    Members thankful for this post (5):



  26. #26
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Flatout Minigame Champion Arjos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Prisoners upon this rock, flying without wings...
    Posts
    8,909

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Here's the rest XD

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    History

    The late 9th century BCE Neo-Hittite reliefs at Kargamiš, could be the earliest record for Mysia. The regent Yariri boasts how his renown reached, among other places, the land of the "Musai". Thus modern historians have linked the Mysoi to the "Muški/Moschoi", who invaded the Hittite region of Wiluša (the north-western portion of Anatolia), three hundred years prior the relief. These tribes served as warbands/mercenaries as far as the Caucasus. Assyrian records mention five kings, so at this time, much like for several centuries to come, Mysia was composed by tribes, under their respective chiefs, forming coalitions or joining larger forces.

    In the 8th century BCE Phrygian kingship developed and it held sway over the Mysoi. By the 7th century BCE, however Mysia was under Lydian supremacy and this condition continued until 546 BCE, when Kūruš of PÔrsa (Cyrus the Great) conquered the region. He then left the famed Lydian treasury in the hands of Paktyes, who revolted and sought assistance at Kyme, where the Aioleis were growing weary of the Persian expansion. They went as far as seeking aid from Sparta, but nothing came of it and were defeated. Thus the people of Mysia recognized Persian suzerainty. Later in 497 BCE satrapal forces, largerly composed by Mysoi and Lydoi, were engaged against revolting Aioleis and Iones. In 480 BCE Khšayāršā of PÔrsa (Xerxes I)'s invading army marched through Mysia, reaching Abydos where it crossed the Hellespontos over pontoon bridges.

    During the Pentekontaetia (the period of fify years), the coasts of Mysia joined Athenai in the Koinon Delion (Delian League), which quickly became more of an Arche (empire). This led to animosity and in 411 BCE, Abydos and Lampsakos were easily inspired to side with Sparta by Derkylidas, the whole of Troas followed suit. Thus the vital grain supply from the Pontos Euxeinos (Black Sea) was in deep peril. All Athenai could do, pressed on many fronts, was mounting punitive raids. Claiming slaves and portable booty from Lampsakos (which lacked strong walls at the time) and exorting a large ransom from Kyzikos, to spare it a similar fate. However these tactics weren't enough and Athenai assembled a fleet, defeating in 410 BCE a Peloponnesian force in the waters of Abydos. Pressing on, the allied Athenian army, under Thrasyboulos, won an hard-fought battle at the shores west of Kyzikos. This instability caused the Mysoi to assert their independence and started raiding indiscriminately Persian estates. Prompting Dārayavahuš of PÔrsa (Darius II), to send his son Kūruš (Cyrus the Younger) against them. Allowing the latter in 401 BCE to hire mercenaries, Xenophon and Oi Myroi (the Ten Thousand) among them. Later the Archagetes Agesilaos of Sparta (Agesilaus II) in 395 BCE, invaded Mysia to compel the Mysoi to join his army. Ravaging as far as Mount Olympos, each side ambushed the other until a truce was reached, to recover the corpses of the fallen. However the Mysoi weren't impressed enough and Agesilaos took revenge against Mysian communities on his way back.

    In 366 BCE Yervand of Hayasdan rose up against Artakhšaša of PÔrsa (Artaxerxes II) and was joined by an alliance of other communities. However he betrayed them right away, in exchange of Mysia. Building something of a private kingdom. Leaderless the rebellion failed, but in 356 BCE the new Khšāyathiya Khšāyathiyānām (King of Kings), of the same name, ordered the disbandment of private armies, causing yet another rebellion. Yervand, by this time minting gold coins at Pergamon in his own image, allied himself with Athenai and was ready to make his bid for power. Yet this time, outmanouvered at his own game, was confronted by a coalition of PÔrsa, Thebai and perhaps Makedonia. So he decided to yield, being allowed to keep his estates in Mysia, with the exception of Pergamon.

    336 BCE saw the arrival of Macedonian forces under Parmenion, setting up at Abydos, they raided Persian assets and collected troops among Hellenes in the Mysian coasts. For the next couple of years, Memnon of Rhodos engaged the Makedones in a clever campaign of maneuver, catching isolated detachments, forcing Parmenion to fallback to Abydos. His strategy, however, wasn't followed any longer and in 334 BCE, Alexandros of Makedonia (Alexander III) secured Mysia at the River Grenikos. During the turmoil of the Diadochoi, in 322 BCE Krateros and 6.000 Macedonian veterans marched through Mysia, to cross over the Hellespontos. Athenai, being in open rebellion, had sent a fleet to secure her all-important grain supply. Once again near Abydos a battle was joined and Krateros was free to complete his trek. Later in 318 BCE ambitious Antigonos Monophthalmos of Phrygia seized the Propontis (Sea of Marmara) coast and gradually courted the Aioleis and poleis of the Hellespontos to ally with him. However with the battle of Ipsos (301 BCE), the Antigonid cause seemed helpless in Mikra Asia and Lysimachos of Thraikia happily obliged to fill that power vacuum, taking care of few staunch garrisons. He proved to be an effective ruler, securing Mysia by vigorous programs of city foundation or refoundation, military colonization and uniting Hellenic poleis in leagues, under governors of his choosing. One such figure was Philetairos, put in charge of Pergamon and its treasury of 9.000 silver talents. After the execution of Agathlokes (son and heir of Lysimachos), who had started to assert his succession, around 283 BCE, a number of officers, including Philetairos, who had collaborated with Agathokles formed a conspiracy to defect in favour of Seleukos Nikator. It's possible that Philetairos offered to fund Seleukos' enterprises, drawing from the Pergamese treasury, in exchange of autonomy. The Asian Basileus, more interested in seizing Thraikia and Makedonia, accepted and thought he would deal with the ambitious eunuch on his way back. Fortunately for Philetairos, in 281 BCE Ptolemaios Keraunos assassinated Seleukos and Pergamon hastily recovered the latter's corpse. Properly cremated, it was sent to his heir Antiochos, who had finally reached Mikra Asia to deal with insurgents. This gesture convinced the Basileus of Philetairos' loyalty and allowed him to keep his autonomy.

    From then on Philetairos initiated his policy of euergesia (benefaction). For example, he gifted 600 shields to Kyme, receiving city honours, subtly bestowed during seleukid festivals. It is clear that the communities of Mysia seeked protection against the Galatai raiders and it is in this context that Philetairos established military colonies. These would form new ethnicities of mixed origins like the Mysomakedones and Mysotymoleitai, recording Mysian and Macedonian veterans forming new communities at the borders of Mysia. These liberties and the recent re-dating of early Pergamene coinage (bearing Philetairos image and now thought to be struck during his reign), suggest the adoption by Antiochos I of Achaemenid practices, granting such rights to local dynasts.

    In 263 BCE Eumenes I succeeded to power and faced a mercenary revolt (likely the military settlers), denoting some difficulties. These probably included a renewal of Galatian raids, which eventually forced Eumenes I to end them with a tribute. In the past it was thought, that Eumenes tried a breakaway from Seleukid authority, but this has come into question. First of all such a conflict stands solely on Phylarchos. An historical writer criticized by his contemporaries for falsifying and re-writing events to shock his audience. Plus during Eumenes I's reign, a Seleukid dating formula continued to be employed and Seleukid minting activity in Aiolis was increased. There's also an arbitration by Seleukos Kallinikos granting the Aeolian polis of Pitane to Eumenes I. All these activities following twenty years, after an alleged victorious engagement against Antiochos I, make the latter a distortion of events.

    In 237 BCE Attalos I, the Pergamene successor, won a battle in the Kaikos valley against Antiochos Hierax and his allied Galatai. This prompted Attalos I to assume the diadem. Hierax was a pretender, who had just defeated Kallinikos and established his own kingdom. Thus Attalos' actions were legitimized, for he owed no allegiance to the pretender. Faced with inefficient Seleukid control in Mikra Asia, which could not preserve stability, Attalos I made the choice to assume full authority. In 225 BCE, Seleukos Keraunos launched a campaign against Attalos I, but this does not imply that the latter's loyalty towards the legitimate Seleukid line and his resistance against usurpers, was unappreciated. What worried the Basileus of Asia, was the Pergamene influence spreading as far as the Tauros. However he was assassinated by his own troops and his relative Achaios vowed to continue his mission. The latter enjoyed great success, shutting Attalos inside Pergamon's walls, and realized that the diadem of Asia was better than loyalty. Once again Attalos found himself treading on a fine line between legitimacy and overstepping his bounds. In 216 BCE an agreement with Antiochos III was reached, for a joint campaign against Achaios: Pergamon was finally recognized as independent, but with rights only over Mysia. Attalos now pursued a cordial coexistence with Seleukid interests, concentrating on Makedonia and dedicating statues to, the now self-styled Basileus Megas (Great King) Antiochos III and Zeuxis.

    In 193 BCE, Attalos' successor, Eumenes II however realized that Pergamon could not expand without conflict with the Seleukidai. No matter how much independent he was, Seleukid superiority in Mikra Asia was apparent, where Antiochos Megas had even asserted dominance of the Troas. Eumenes II then refused to marry Antiochos Megas' daughter and furthered his relations with Roma, allies since Attalos' reign. In the ensuing war the Pergamese basileus organized the crossing of the Hellespontos for the Roman legiones. Withstanding a siege on Pergamon, Eumenes II was eventually victorious and his influence greatly extended. These larger borders of 187 BCE, brought the following conflicts away from Mysia, allowing Eumenes II to introduce a new monetary policy and embark on a lavish building programme, transforming Pergamon into one of the showpieces of the Hellenistic world. He extended the sanctuary of Athena Nikephoros, refounding the Nikephoria games, which reached panhellenic status. He also enlarged the Pergamon library, founded by his father Attalos I, to be second only to that of Alexandreia. Lastly he began the construction of the Great Altar, themed after the Gigantomachia, perhaps as a parallel to the Attalid struggle against the Galatai.

    His brother Attalos II, regent for Eumenes II's son, had continued this envisaged relationship of equals between Pergamon and Roma, but it became clear it was turning into a one-way dependency on the SPQR's goodwill. Therefore Attalos II mainly focused on holding the kingdom together and engaged in political intrigue, for example setting up, in 157 BCE, Alexandros Balas as Basileus of Seleukid Syria.

    In 138 BCE, after the death of his regent, Attalos III ascended to the throne. He seems to have had scholarly pursuits in botany and pharmacology, but was not much interested in governing. Still epigraphic evidence speaks of cultic benefactions and at least one military success. However his eccentricity forged, in posterity, an image of cruelty and misgovernment. But the records are vague and without foundation (the Roman Senatvs formally decreed all of Attalos III's acts valid), perhaps due to slander for a Basileus, who did not behave "kingly". In 133 BCE, dying childless, Attalos III bequeathed his possessions to "the Roman peole".

    A certain Aristonikos, of unknown origins, saw his chance for power and declared himself a bastard brother, assuming the diadem as Eumenes III. He faced fierce opposition from the poleis; while rulers from Bithynia, Pontos, Kappadokia and Paphlagonia already aimed at carving up the Pergamese kingdom. Eumenes III lacked support, only Phokaia joined him spontaneously, and suffered setbacks, so he resorted to freeing slaves, advocating radical changes for the suppressed rural populace. Defeated and captured in 129 BCE, he was paraded publicly in Roma and the Senatvs, judging Asia too unstable, assumed responsibility, forcing a settlement among the powers of the region.

    The Romani came to describe Pergamon's possessions as the "spoils of Asia", something all too clear from the overtaxation, which had left the people of Mysia seething over the collectors' arrogance and greed. So widespread was this sentiment, that in 89 BCE Mithradates VI of Pontos, having captured Manivs Aqvillivs, had him tied backwards on a donkey, paraded through towns until Pergamon and there poured molten gold down his throat. Still this wasn't enough, with the passing of winter, Mithradates VI now exploited this hatred for his gains, by sending letters to every poleis and governors instructing them to execute every single Romanvs living in Mikra Asia. By way of encouragement he offered a share in the property of the victims, freedom for every slave killing his Roman master and halving of debts. This unleashed a massacre of 80.000 people. At Adramyttion the killers drowned indiscriminately men, women and children. At Pergamon archers shot foreigners down, as these clung to the statues of the gods, seeking sanctuary in temples. Lastly, always per order of Mithradates VI, the corpses were thrown outside and left unburied.

    With the fortunes of war swinging towards the Roman side in 85 BCE, many in Mysia and Mikra Asia began to ask themselves what Roma would do to the region that had committed such atrocities and their loyalty to the Pontic cause started to waver. Mithradates VI certainly did not help the situation, when he deceived the Galatian aristocracy to join their hostage families at a banquet in Pergamon, promising a conciliation and massacrated them, except for three nobles, who managed to escape. At this point poleis simply refused entrance to Pontic troops. Mithradates answered by granting citizenship for resident aliens, freeing slaves and cancellation of debts; effectively establishing stasis (civic strife) in every poleis. This prompted several high-ranking Pergamenes courtiers and officials to form conspiracies to overthrow the Pontic basileus. They were, however, betrayed and tortured, revealing their fellow plotters, causing Mithradates to collect more information throughout other major poleis, eventually purging 1.600 people. This climate offered Gaivs Flavivs Fimbria, a political enemy of Svlla, who was left to his own devices, too good an opportunity to take over the riches of Mysia and its royal court. Quickly disposing of half-trained levies at the River Rhyndakos, Fimbria reached Pergamon and was informed that Mithradates had fled to Pitane in Aiolis, attempting a naval escape. At the harbour Mithradates was just ultimating the preparations, when both Fimbria and Lvcivs Licinivs Lvcvllvs, Svlla's subordinate, arrived one by land and the latter by sea. Here the genius of the Pontic basileus saved his skin once more, by offering to submit to the "official" Roman army (Fimbria's) he was free to sail away unopposed, since the domestic support for ending the war against Mithradates would've doomed Svlla. Having made clear how Mithradates and Svlla needed eachother at this stage, they met at Ilion and, in a show of realpolitik, brought an end to the First Mithridatic War.

    Fimbria and his men, as frustrated as it can be imagined they were, raced to the Troas, but found the meeting over and the populace, informed him, had entrusted itself to Svlla. The Roman general responded that the Troiani were already friends of the SPQR, so there was no reason to not let him enter. With the gates open, pillage and slaughter followed, what was not worth stealing was burned and "not a house, not a temple, not a statue was left standing". This forced, in 84 BCE, Svlla to cross once again, setting up a circumvallation. A desperate Fimbria, deserted by his men, took his own life. Woes for Mysia and Mikra Asia were not over, Svlla declared that Roma was owed 20.000 talents in reparations and back taxes; he also ordered his soldiers to be quartered by the locals, each family providing meals, an allowance and clothing to their "guests". If this was not enough, in 73 BCE Mithradates VI, who mustered another large army, descended into Mysia across the coast of the Propontis (Sea of Marmara). All major poleis either fell or opened their gates, except for Kyzikos. Besieging it turned out to be a logistical nightmare for Mithradates. Set backs, storms, dysentery, frozen winter cold and a Roman counter siege annihilated the Pontic army, as it tried to evacuate.

    In 48 BCE Pvblivs Servilivs Vatia Isavricvs, as the governor of Asia, declared Pergamon a democracy, reducing the amount of tribute owed to Roma and shifted tax collection to local aristocrats. The economy of the Mysian poleis slowly started to recover after a century of merciless exploitation. While the Mysian tribes of the interior, although taking part in the conflicts, managed to preserve their communities. It's recorded, for example, that Gaivs Jvlivs Caesar Octavianvs (Octavian) in 31 BCE named Kleon of the Abrettenoi, for switching sides during the civil war against Marcvs Antonivs, the priesthood of Komana. This Kleon must've been a priest-chief figure, because Strabon states he also was priest of Zeus Abrettenos. With his enhanced authority, Kleon expanded and refounded his hometown into Juliopolis. Lastly in 29 BCE Pergamon established games and a cult in honour of Roma and Octavianvs, this was to evolve, in the next century, into the practice of Neokoroi (temple-wardens) and the cult of the living emperor.

    Strategy

    The incredible position, controlling the Hellespontos, gold mines, availability of war-like tribes ready to join the fighting force and defensible geography make Mysia the archetype seat of power. Any ruler, with imperial designs, will find it vital.
    Last edited by Arjos; 07-29-2013 at 19:06.

    Members thankful for this post (5):



  27. #27
    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Directing the defence of Boiotergion
    Posts
    3,355

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Wow! It is HUUUGE! But really a terrific job, Arjos! Much appreciated!

  28. #28

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team


    *applause*

  29. #29

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Edit
    Last edited by I Am Herenow; 05-22-2017 at 20:12.

    Member thankful for this post:

    Arjos 


  30. #30
    COYATOYPIKC Senior Member Flatout Minigame Champion Arjos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Prisoners upon this rock, flying without wings...
    Posts
    8,909

    Default Re: Regional Descriptions: Help the EBII Team

    Thanks, will edit everything tomorrow :)
    Much appreciated the general points, really needed them before starting another!

    Quote Originally Posted by I Am Herenow View Post
    To maintain consistency across the mod's descriptions we have decided to use British spelling throughout.
    Although @I Am Herenow could you explain this better? I've re-read Brennus' Combrogon and there are few native names. What criteria should I follow?

    Quote Originally Posted by I Am Herenow View Post
    I would advise against writing in the first person: I think it sounds cheesy. ... For similar reasons do not mention or reference "the reader"/"my readers"/... in a passage.
    BTW I was trying to make a pseudo-historian account (with a 3rd century point of view), giving the traveller a voice. Just an idea :P

    Quote Originally Posted by I Am Herenow View Post
    For instance, what do you mean by "better" here? And why is it better? Your overall point is unclear to me.
    When writing that, I was considering whether it would've been confusing or not to introduce sub-regional names. In the end it seemed better, instead of having a massive description dotted with landmarks, to have those sub-units. I also hoped, it conveyed the heterogeneity of Mysia...
    Last edited by Arjos; 05-06-2013 at 06:29.

Page 1 of 18 1234511 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO