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Thread: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

  1. #31

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    As already mentioned, I've used Magna Grecia as my military province in both Rome campaigns. During Campaign 1, this was the only province that had any military buildings at all, and it worked well enough. That experience lay behind my posted comment above. In second campaign, however, I spread it out a bit and hit upon a setup/process that I think I like even better. Legionary barracks line in M.G., and Aux Barracks in Hellas (because I wanted Cretan archers). Siege workshop at Apollonia, in between the two.

    An army spends 3-4 turns recruiting the legionary core in MG, then crosses over to Apollonia for its ballistae, and finally finishes up cav/skirmisher/missile troops in Hellas. Each hop is short enough that it can be done in normal (vice forced-march) mode, and therefore you never lose a recruitment turn. Meanwhile, a 2nd legion can start at Hellas and work the same process in reverse, allowing the build of two legions in parallel rather than in series, as would have to be the case if all were confined to just one province. Pretty handy at those imperium jumps when 3 new army slots open up.

    This approach also allows spreading the training/equipment buildings in such a way that each province still has ample slots to remain lucrative and happy. Both Hellas and Magna Grecia were among my richest provinces despite giving up some military slots.

    Of course, this does force one to commit to conquering Macedonia and Hellas as early as possible...a task easier-said-than-done early-game vs Greek hoplites. I did this in Normal...may not be as feasible on higher difficulties. The concept doesn't have to require these two specific provinces, of course. I think they work well, however, because of the geographic juxtaposition of Brundisium, Apollonia, and the Hellas border near Athens, and also because a Hellas aux barracks provides a nice missile unit in Cretan Archers.
    Last edited by Bramborough; 10-10-2013 at 16:11.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Couldn't agree more Bramborough. Sounds like a very sweet setup. I went for Hellas several times, but always by way of conquering Knossos and leaving the spartans alone. This increased my travel time substantially and when I eventually did go after the greeks they tore more than one half-finished legion to peices on the water because of it. THis method seems far superior, and with a little luck you might be able to do it without conquering all of greece first, just get the needed buildings up quickly before moving against the major factions.
    I was trying to find some help in the ancient military journals of General Tacticus, who's intelligent campaigning had been so successful that he'd lent his very name to the detailed prosecution of martial endeavour, and had actually found a section headed "What To Do If One Army Occupies A Well-Fortified And Superior Ground And The Other Does Not", but since the first sentence read "Endeavour to be the one inside" I'd rather lost heart.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Myth View Post
    Actually in the long-term, Brundisium is better suited to become a dedicated military province by virtue of having less resouces. The more resources in the minor cities, the more of those minor cities you must upgrade to level 4 thereby reducing the available happiness in that province to be allocated to military buildings.

    The best setup for me (I'll confirm once i do it in-game) would be:

    Brundisium: Temple to Mars + 2 x training field + Circus (or the Maxiums), Minors get 2 x barracks, Syracuse gets upgraded to tier 4. To get the PO needed you'd probably have to dedicate slots in minor settlments to temples.

    Rome: 2 x Workshop buildings, the rest goes to the standard. So you recruit in Brudisium, then move north to equip your armies with better weapons and armour and you're good to go.
    I'm not so sure about this myself. I agree with your core point, Magna Greacia as your military province over Italia, that works fine and as most people conquer the rest of Magna Graecia early on doesn't have any major drawbacks, and it's more succeptible to invasion than Italia (especially once at war with Carthage and it's allies) so the garrison troops come in handy.

    BUT... Whats the deal with having a barracks in each minor settlement in the province? Am I misreading this? Barracks are province-wide. You can recruit from Lillbaem a unit produced in a barracks in Brundisium without any issues. The only reason to have more than one of each barracks is auxillia barracks for the region specific troops, many of which are specific to Lillybaum for example, but it's still only reason enough to build two in the province.

    And the workshop being elsewhere, I do agree with the principal idea, especially when spreading out your recruitment, but I tend to build a workshop up to level two in all recruitment provinces, more if I can afford the public order hit. Not for the troop producing, mainly because it applies the +weapon/armour/shield effects for free to all troops recruited there. While it won't matter in the late game as your swimming in cash, it will cost you more than half as much as you pay to recruit the troops to upgrade them elsewhere. Is this really worth saving a building slot or three? I honestly don't know.
    I was trying to find some help in the ancient military journals of General Tacticus, who's intelligent campaigning had been so successful that he'd lent his very name to the detailed prosecution of martial endeavour, and had actually found a section headed "What To Do If One Army Occupies A Well-Fortified And Superior Ground And The Other Does Not", but since the first sentence read "Endeavour to be the one inside" I'd rather lost heart.

  4. #34

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Sociopsychoactive View Post
    with a little luck you might be able to do it without conquering all of greece first, just get the needed buildings up quickly before moving against the major factions.
    True, the only settlements one has to have for this are Apollonia, Athens, and Larissa (for the clear travel path).

  5. #35

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Sociopsychoactive View Post
    BUT... Whats the deal with having a barracks in each minor settlement in the province? Am I misreading this? Barracks are province-wide. You can recruit from Lillbaem a unit produced in a barracks in Brundisium without any issues. The only reason to have more than one of each barracks is auxillia barracks for the region specific troops, many of which are specific to Lillybaum for example, but it's still only reason enough to build two in the province.

    And the workshop being elsewhere, I do agree with the principal idea, especially when spreading out your recruitment, but I tend to build a workshop up to level two in all recruitment provinces, more if I can afford the public order hit. Not for the troop producing, mainly because it applies the +weapon/armour/shield effects for free to all troops recruited there. While it won't matter in the late game as your swimming in cash, it will cost you more than half as much as you pay to recruit the troops to upgrade them elsewhere. Is this really worth saving a building slot or three? I honestly don't know.
    Not to put words in Myth's mouth, but yeah, I think you're misreading it. I interpret his comment to mean two barracks (one legionary, one aux) spread among the various minor settlements...just don't build in Brundisium, because it's provincial-capital slots are more valuable for all the building types not available to the minors. The reason the training-field line goes in Brundisium is because it's only build-able in a provincial capital. I think the "Syracuse 4x" means that Syracuse is the only town to be built to Level IV (eventually) because it's a grain-resource town.

    I'm likewise ambivalent about workshop placement. It's probably case-dependent. Separate-province workshop worked really well in my MG-Macedon-Hellas scheme, for example. In other situations, however, might not be worth the extra equipment costs (which do indeed get pricey).

  6. #36

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Myth, you might be interested by the romana auxiliary guide, it might be usefull for a roman campaign player :

    http://tallmyr.se/rome2/
    Last edited by Alcibiade; 10-12-2013 at 12:33.

  7. #37

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    A very helpful guide, many thanks.
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  8. #38

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    It appears that only 1 level five building is permitted per type. For example I can only build one circus maximus regardless of how many wine resources I have. Ditto for the colosseum

  9. #39
    Strategist and Storyteller Member Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Alcibiade View Post
    Myth, you might be interested by the romana auxiliary guide, it might be usefull for a roman campaign player :

    http://tallmyr.se/rome2/
    Useful but not up to date or comprehensive enough. For example, look at the tier 4 Aux barracks and what units it can produce in the in-game encyclopedia. Take the Auxillary Persian Cavalry unit. It clearly states it can be recruited i Alexandria (it's the best cav Rome can field IMO), but the map doesn't show it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seyavash View Post
    It appears that only 1 level five building is permitted per type. For example I can only build one circus maximus regardless of how many wine resources I have. Ditto for the colosseum
    That is correct. Their placement is very important. I'd put the Colosseum in Rome along with a tier 5 sewage system, and the Circus Maximus in whatever is my main recruitment province since it will have 2 training fields, 2 smithies and 1 barracks (so a hefty -50 to PO just from those, -60 if you count a tier 4 minor settlment).
    The art of war, then, is governed by five constant
    factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations,
    when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

    These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth;
    (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.
    Sun Tzu, "The Art of War"
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  10. #40

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Myth View Post
    Useful but not up to date or comprehensive enough. For example, look at the tier 4 Aux barracks and what units it can produce in the in-game encyclopedia. Take the Auxillary Persian Cavalry unit. It clearly states it can be recruited i Alexandria (it's the best cav Rome can field IMO), but the map doesn't show it.
    Ah, ok. My bad.

  11. #41
    Strategist and Storyteller Member Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Updated the guide to modern standards.
    The art of war, then, is governed by five constant
    factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations,
    when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

    These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth;
    (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.
    Sun Tzu, "The Art of War"
    Like totalwar.org on Facebook!

  12. #42

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    I think your guide is very good. But I think it clearly shows how there is only one true atrategy to play the game. One must basically make the same choices in that ordrer in which you describe, if one want's to play optimally. Am I wrong about this, is it possible to follow a completely different approach than the general guideline you have laid out, and still play optimally?

  13. #43

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    That's not the way I look at Myth's guide. More generally, I don't think that's what a guide is for.

    A TW game is so complex in possible permutations and combinations, the idea of "optimal" is elusive. In any case, a player searching for "optimal" is well beyond needing a guide. Instead, what I believe Myth is offering here is a solid, successful way to get through the early turns with Rome and place the faction on solid ground for mid- and late-game. And that's all a guide should be. After all, the folks out there looking for a guide are probably the folks who are finding themselves struggling to get a good start. Or, other players who've had some success with a faction but see some ideas here to improve.

    An alternative way to view the situation: Let's suppose that Myth's guide (or any other) IS in fact "optimal", and represents the "best" way to play a faction. Beyond that, perhaps the fun of a campaign might be in seeing how successful one can be in making major departures from the "optimum". Examples "Ok, so that conventional method obviously works well....let's see how Rome does if we build all its armies solely from the Aux Barracks and mercenaries...no legionary troops." Or "Let's see what happens if we really push the slave factor in economy....slave markets in every city, enslave after every battle...can we keep the lid on public order?"

  14. #44

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    That's great to hear, I like options and experimentation. I am definitely one of those needing a basic guide. At least if I play on Legendary I would need to do things more optimal than I do now, and this guide does a good job at telling what technologies and buildings you should always choose and in what order to get the best result.

  15. #45
    A Livonian Rebel Member Slaists's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by ScipioAfrianus View Post
    I think your guide is very good. But I think it clearly shows how there is only one true atrategy to play the game. One must basically make the same choices in that ordrer in which you describe, if one want's to play optimally. Am I wrong about this, is it possible to follow a completely different approach than the general guideline you have laid out, and still play optimally?
    The guide is a good thing to acquaint a newcomer with the game or give experienced players some new ideas. Otherwise, everyone is encouraged to make their own path. Most importantly, find a style that let's you enjoy the game. I for one, purposely do stupid things based on the characteristics of my leaders in order to handicap my progress a bit. It is in no way "optimal", but brings more fun to my campaigns (for me).

    As to "optimal" play, think of it this way: if you play optimally against the AI, it will guarantee a boring mid-to-late game for you aka "steamrolling". Playing the campaign against a human opponent is a different matter. There "optimum play" can be important but also could quickly result in one of the players quickly being so outmatched that the disadvantaged side decides to quit.
    Last edited by Slaists; 11-06-2013 at 18:33.

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  16. #46
    Member Member Skott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    I just took Carthage and I was wondering if I should convert their existing troop lot to a Auxillery Camp or a Manipular Camp or should I tear it all down and put something else there in its place? Its my only territory on the African continent so not sure which is best to proceed. I already took Caralis and Nova Carthage declared war on me when I attacked Carthage so I do have to deal with them. I'm guessing I need something to make troops to extend the military reach for my growing empire in that area. A Roman Training camp makes Legionaires but a Manipular Camp makes Verteran Legionaires. Do I need the best training facilities in each town/city or just have them spread out with the lesser training camps taking up most of the captured territories and sprinkling in the big ones every so often in key areas?

  17. #47
    A Livonian Rebel Member Slaists's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Skott View Post
    I just took Carthage and I was wondering if I should convert their existing troop lot to a Auxillery Camp or a Manipular Camp or should I tear it all down and put something else there in its place? Its my only territory on the African continent so not sure which is best to proceed. I already took Caralis and Nova Carthage declared war on me when I attacked Carthage so I do have to deal with them. I'm guessing I need something to make troops to extend the military reach for my growing empire in that area. A Roman Training camp makes Legionaires but a Manipular Camp makes Verteran Legionaires. Do I need the best training facilities in each town/city or just have them spread out with the lesser training camps taking up most of the captured territories and sprinkling in the big ones every so often in key areas?
    Unless you can grab the whole province, can put an auxiliary barracks there as well [some decent desert troops there for variety]. Otherwise, if you have all of the province of Africa, makes sense to go all-out economy there (ports, temples that boost income, etc.): it's a province with one of the highest income potentials in the game if not the highest.
    Last edited by Slaists; 12-12-2013 at 21:38.

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  18. #48

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    This guide gave me a good start to my first campaign in RTW II, so first off thanks for writing it! I've unknowingly used the same tactic as Bramborough and concentrated my military buildings to a few provinces in key locations (about every third province I totally control). Apart from some minor problems with public order it has worked like a charm so far, and rebuilding a slot here or there has taken care of any issues.

    Here's a few pointers I picked up on along the way:

    * Amphitheatres are an excellent way to control PO in military provinces (or anywhere really) seeing as they give you +6/+12/+24 PO in just one slot. As food is a global resource its cost can be compensated by building farms in another province. Additionally they give the option to recruit gladiators, which are pretty decent when sprinkled into your ordinary legions for damage.

    * Sieges are fun! I used to autobattle them in the original Rome since they were so complicated and time consuming, but in my opinion they've fixed it quite nicely in RTW II. Of course the AI is still a bit weird from time to time, but I suppose sieges weren't really that co-ordinated historically. Also worth noting is that manually fighting sieges can really turn the tide compared to an automatic battle. For Rome both Rorarii and regular infantry troops can hold their own quite nicely in confined spaces so I've been able to hold off large forces with just the garrison.

    * Ballistas are awesome, as noted above (I think). Not only do they inflict massive damage but using them is way more fun than I ever expected. Downside is the AI isn't really that good at using - or rather protecting - them.

    * Always keep an eye on your army's movement, especially in coastal regions. They can take really strange routes to places, and apparently enjoy jumping into transports and attacking from the sea side.

    * A few turns into the campaign I'm starting to encounter different sort of caps that I haven't seen explained anywhere and that don't seem very consistent or logical to me. For instance in some regions I can only 2 Farms and when I try to build another one in an appropiate slot the option doesn't appear (only Temple, Field of Mars and Workshop). In other regions I can only build Cattle Pens instead of Farms after getting a Villa. There also appears to be a cap of the research rate at 200% but I haven't tried that out extensively yet. Does anyone know if this is how it's supposed to work and what mechanic controls it in that case?

    * Naval battles confuse me a lot, and I seem to be losing them most of the time despite the odds on my side. Does anyone have any recommendations about it or know of a guide on how it works?

    Kind regards
    "It's easy to be outnumbered when you're a zero" - George of the Jungle

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  19. #49

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Thank you thank you! for this superb guide I been playing Rome for a couple off days and I just couldn't find a good strategy. This all change after I read this guide now I'm doing really well.
    Just have a dumb question regarding buildings. For example on the city of alalia I have a roman village, trading port, cattle pens, and a shrine. So let's say I have the shrine of minerva lv 3 and right above the icon I have convert/dismantle. If choose another shrine from the option do I keep both shrines or just the one, the same on the cattle and farms do I keep both or just one

    Thanks

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  20. #50

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Ballistas are awesome, as noted above (I think). Not only do they inflict massive damage but using them is way more fun than I ever expected.
    100% agree. I love using ballistae, they're a standard item in the vast majority of armies I build. Slaists, however, has pointed out that the presence of siege artillery significantly affects AI aggression, causing it to rashly attack en masse if the player has siege artillery and the AI does not (which is usually the case). Some experimentation on my part has convinced me that he's correct. I personally don't have much of a problem with this using Hellenic armies with pike units; enemy aggression is exactly what I want. It does, however, start to lead to a certain "sameness" as the battles start to resemble each other. If at some point you'd prefer for the character of the battles to become a bit more varied, try dropping the ballistae.

    For instance in some regions I can only 2 Farms and when I try to build another one in an appropiate slot the option doesn't appear (only Temple, Field of Mars and Workshop). In other regions I can only build Cattle Pens instead of Farms after getting a Villa.
    From this short description, I'm pretty sure what you're seeing is the fact that you cannot have duplicate buildings above Level I in the same city. So, for example, lets say you have a minor settlement with two open slots. It is possible to build two Villas in those two slots, because the Villa leads to multiple building types. Once one of those Villas has been upgraded into a Farm, however, then that leaves only the Cattle Pen available as an upgrade in the other slot.

    Also worth mentioning, the agricultural building types are not available in provincial capitals for most "civilized" factions (barbarian factions are an exception).

    Naval battles confuse me a lot, and I seem to be losing them most of the time despite the odds on my side. Does anyone have any recommendations about it or know of a guide on how it works?
    I've worked up a rough draft of a naval warfare guide which is under some edit/review. I hope it will appear on this forum soon, so check back.

    In meantime, a very short summary: Ram/board tactics require a lot of micromanagement. With fleets larger than say 5-6 ships, my own belief is that close-quarters "naval melee" becomes one of the very few things (perhaps only thing) at which the AI excels the average human player. So...fight naval battles at long range using artillery ships. Use a high preponderance of ballista-equipped ships (say, roughly half or at least a third of your fleet). Use jav/archer ships, with fire-at-will enabled and flaming projectiles chosen, as a screen to protect your ballista ships, which do the ship-killing.

    So let's say I have the shrine of minerva lv 3 and right above the icon I have convert/dismantle. If choose another shrine from the option do I keep both shrines or just the one, the same on the cattle and farms do I keep both or just one
    No, just one temple. You're converting that slot to different use, not building additional capacity. Same with agricultural buildings or any other type slot.

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  21. #51
    Strategist and Storyteller Member Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Glad this guide is helping people out! Yes, for building slots - you can have only one type of building BRANCH per settlement. You can have multiple branches from a TYPE of building within the same settlement.

    So you can have two or even three temples, two civic buildings, two farm tier buildings etc. just not the same identical ones.

    Public order control is great for the "civilized" factions due to the theater level buildings. It's not as easy to get a PO bonus with the barbarians. I've mentioned the PO boosting amphitheater in the tech part of the guide.
    The art of war, then, is governed by five constant
    factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations,
    when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

    These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth;
    (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.
    Sun Tzu, "The Art of War"
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  22. #52

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Thanks for the replies! Really cleared up the issues I had with buildings. Looking forward to your naval guide Bramborough, I'm betting you got it quite right above. Too bad naval battles are so tricky since they look sort of cool until your admiral's ship is sunk by a leves in a rowing boat...

    As for there being a cap on researching bonuses I've discovered there is in fact none (at least not at 200%). Apparently I got stuck on that for a while, but am now at 202%.

    Kind regards
    "It's easy to be outnumbered when you're a zero" - George of the Jungle

  23. #53
    Strategist and Storyteller Member Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    As a Roman or Hellenistic faction there is no reason not to build a tier 4 research building in any province which is not dedicated to military recruitment.
    The art of war, then, is governed by five constant
    factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations,
    when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

    These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth;
    (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.
    Sun Tzu, "The Art of War"
    Like totalwar.org on Facebook!

  24. #54

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    The guide has been quite helpful. However, I'm lucky to have more than about 2k income per turn. Sometimes it gets as high as 3k or drop as low as 1k. Part of the problem is I have only been able to sign trade agreements with 1-2 factions at a time, because everyone else hates us too much to sign one. This is playing as Junia. I'm currently just around turn 50-55. I've taken all of Africa, Secured the peninsula (all of Italy, Sicily and that 3 city provence north of Rome) and the 2 islands west of Rome. I made one of the cities to the east of Rome a client state.

    My questions are.
    How much should I be making a turn?
    How can I get more trade agreements with everyone hating on me so much?

  25. #55

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Army upkeep may be part of it. Are you maxed out on full-size armies and fleets with expensive units?

    Despite that, with five full provinces, yeah, hovering around 2K does sound rather low. Especially since 3 of these (Italia, Magna Graecia, and Africa) are among the richest in the game. Without seeing your builds, I suspect they may not be optimized well for income.

    A couple of thoughts:

    1. How are your Africa ports configured? The strength of this province is that all of its cities are coastal. Build commercial ports in all four, plus a wine market (yellow) and amphora maker (industrial brown) in Carthago. Even at just Level II, this alone should get Africa producing some serious coin.

    2. Take a look at how many military (red) bldgs you have, and where you have them located. You don't need more than one of each type. It's possible you have too many build slots throughout your territory given over to military production.

    3. If/when choosing between cattle and grain, choose grain in minor settlements. Not only is this better for food surplus, but Junia has an agricultural income trait.

    4. As far as trade agreements, I'm not sure, as it's been several patches since I've played as Rome. One idea is to look at your few trade partners, try to develop those trade agreements into higher-value alliances. This will increase your influence not only with them, but with their buddies. Also, when you go to war with someone, look and see who their other enemies are; the fact that you're at war with a common enemy should help relations. Related to that, if you're planning on attacking someone, instead of declaring directly, go to one of their enemies and offer to join the war, perhaps that will help relations as well. These are just general suggestions, not Rome/Junia specific, of course.

  26. #56

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    "Prepare for civil war from the senate loyalists by destroying the military buildings in the capital to prevent them from having elite units, and keep an army or two stationed nearby to keep them from taking too many regions."

    I see in other forum this... Is that true?!... My military buildings are in Magna Grecia, I do not building any of these in Rome. So, when civil war erupts (in Rome???), I'll need to destroy my miitary buildings to have a weakness senate armie?...

  27. #57

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Thanks for the reply.

    After starting over a few more times I finally managed to get the finances under control. It seems to work better with Julia instead of Junia, because it's easier to get trade routes with a lot more civs.

    I have a few more questions.
    1) Do ya'll try to complete all the objectives for each chapter mission for the bonus cash from them?
    2) Is it better to ignore the most of the bonus objectives and just complete the main chapter mission? In other words, will I make more money from just conquering my way across the globe taking the provinces I want and expanding my armies as I go instead of trying to complete all the objectives first?
    3)After reading some other threads I've started just razing every settlement after taking out the Etruscan League (I occupied theirs because they already had roman buildings). Do ya'll do this too, or are there times where it's better to occupy? Is there ever a good reason to loot a settlement since it just damages all the buildings, but doesn't give enough cash to pay for the repairs/conversions, has the highest unrest from the initial, overtime and all the added slaves?
    4) Is there really any point to having fleets with more than just the admiral and maybe a unit or two set to patrol?

  28. #58

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    These province builds are busts. I don't know what you've done, but I'm pretty sure you've confused yourself with some of the training and workshop buildings having -10 PO and -10 food. If you move your Workshop buildings to new province all together, this will work then. You can't have all barracks, 2 training, and 2 workshops in one province. No matter how you do, it's impossible.

  29. #59

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Quote Originally Posted by Monthar View Post
    Thanks for the reply.

    After starting over a few more times I finally managed to get the finances under control. It seems to work better with Julia instead of Junia, because it's easier to get trade routes with a lot more civs.

    I have a few more questions.
    1) Do ya'll try to complete all the objectives for each chapter mission for the bonus cash from them?
    2) Is it better to ignore the most of the bonus objectives and just complete the main chapter mission? In other words, will I make more money from just conquering my way across the globe taking the provinces I want and expanding my armies as I go instead of trying to complete all the objectives first?
    3)After reading some other threads I've started just razing every settlement after taking out the Etruscan League (I occupied theirs because they already had roman buildings). Do ya'll do this too, or are there times where it's better to occupy? Is there ever a good reason to loot a settlement since it just damages all the buildings, but doesn't give enough cash to pay for the repairs/conversions, has the highest unrest from the initial, overtime and all the added slaves?
    4) Is there really any point to having fleets with more than just the admiral and maybe a unit or two set to patrol?
    - No, I very rarely complete all objectives for a given chapter. In fact, I only remember doing that once, and it was a pretty early milestone. For that matter, I don't really try to complete the main chapter objective either...it'll come eventually. I do, however, often look at the secondary objectives just to see what's easily attainable (say, building a few more ships that I probably would've eventually built anyway).

    - I almost always occupy. Less of a P.O. hit than raze. And costs less money to dismantle/rebuild intact buildings than it does to repair/dismantle/rebuild damaged ones. And I strictly avoid looting...slave population is just more trouble than it's worth.

    - I build several full-size fleets, but usually later in the game. Early on, yep, I just have the starting fleet (if the faction has one...most do) for exploration purposes. I sell superfluous units, leaving only the admiral flagship plus one extra. Then I send it cruising through the Med and Atlantic to discover factions (i.e., trade partners). The reason for the extra ship is that when the admiral dies, the fleet stays in being and you can just replace the admiral instead of having to build a new fleet at home. Pretty handy when the little fleet is up near Ireland or in the Baltic.

    Later on, I find fleets very helpful. AI armies tend to go to sea a lot whether it really makes sense for them to do so or not. Having a few fleets helps to round 'em up and eliminate. In addition, fleets are quite capable of capturing coastal minor settlements on their own, without land army support.

  30. #60

    Default Re: Mini Guide: Getting started with Rome II

    Sure Occupy is less of a PO hit initially, but in the long run Raze is less.

    Occupy -25 initially and -10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 for a total hit of -80
    Raze -50 initially and -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 for a total hit of -65

    I can see the cost difference for converting some buildings, but if I have to completely dismantle a building to build something else in its place it'll cost the same as it would if I had just razed and not take the extra turn to dismantle before replacing. With Razing the city center and port are the only buildings the remain. All others are blank if the AI had built on them.

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