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Thread: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

  1. #1

    Default Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma


    Greetings, fans of Total War! In honour of the Re-release Party of Medieval 2: Total War organised by totalwar.org, the Europa Barbarorum II team asked to share some stories about the upcoming mod. As you probably know, EB II is a total conversion of M2:TW Kingdoms to Hellenistic times. I hope you enjoy this AAR, it is my first. All footage is in-game, and I am playing Roma on Hard/Medium difficulties.



    Spring. It is the year of the second consulship of both Lucius Papirius Cursor and Spurius Carvilius Maximus.

    At this time in the Civitas Romana, six men stand out among their peers. Some have achieved great feats in service of the Quirites, others Fortuna has certainly endowed a noble future. Manius Curius Dentatus is the greatest among these men: the hero of Beneventum, he led the Romans to avert the danger posed to the very Urbs by Pyrrhus of Epirus. Now, his imperium has been prolonged as proconsul. He holds an iron grip over his troops, and plans to finish what he started: to drive the allies of King Pyrrhus from Magna Graecia.



    Manius Valerius Maximus, recently elected praetor, is a rising star in Roman politics. A scion of the ancient gens Valeria, descendant of Publicola himself, this energetic patrician thinks twice about every step he takes for the good of the res publica. Camped with a legion of citizens and allies at the gates of the great city of Arpi, his imperium allows him to strike quickly at our foes.



    Furthermore, it are the names of Marcus Atilius Regulus, and the brothers Cnaeus and Lucius Cornelius Scipio which are most often whispered amongst senators, while a young knight named Caius Aurelius Cotta looks to carve out a destiny of his own.

    Seeing his path laid clearly before him, Dentatus orders Regulus to take command of a legion stationed in the north of Etruria and return to the outskirts of Rome. There, the old proconsul will march his men through the lands of Rome's allies to the enemies that lurk in the south.



    Meanwhile, the socii in Etruria, realizing the generous clemency granted to them by the Senate and People of Rome, decide to cut forests and drain marches to expand their cultivation of the natural riches of agricultural land. They too must feed their citizens after the ravages of war in the previous decades.



    Unfortunately, gathering his legion in the summertime in the vicinity of Rome, Dentatus, already weakened by old age, dies of tertian fever. Three times consul, having triumphed twice, the plebeians weep over the body of their erstwhile hero.



    However, an even greater disaster strikes the city when the Hernici take the opportunity of Roman disarray to revolt once more, after 34 years of peace. The city of Aletrium serves as their base of operations. Marcus Atilius Regulus, a proud senator of Campanian origins, asks the senate and people to be allowed to punish the rebels with swift justice, seeing the consuls and praetors are occupied with other matters in the south. After some debate, this extraordinary command is granted to him. With him he takes Caius Aurelius Cotta, an ambitious young eques looking for military experience.



    The odds do not particularly favour Regulus, but his determination and the courage of his troops are his main weapons.





    Regulus decides the best way to defeat the foe is to split his forces in two, attacking the extremes of the enemy line.







    Meanwhile, he brings his small unit of retainers around the left flank and charges the back of the enemy formation, while his numerically inferior main body of cavalry is ordered to hold off the enemy horsemen. The Roman resolve quickly turns into a local victory, as the right flank of the enemy begins to crumble.



    However, with the immediate element of surprise and shock gone, and the enemy cavalry pinning down the Roman equites, the fight quickly descends into chaos.





    Only thanks to the constant energetic charges of Regulus and the young Cotta, and the superior mores of their soldiers, the Romans ultimately snatch a costly victory from the rebellious Hernici.





    Afterwards, Regulus decides to punish the city of Aletrium by sacking it, and the legion marches home laden with booty.


    In the south, Manius Valerius Maximus, quickly becoming the most distinguished among the Romans, has his own problems to deal with. A captain of Pyrrhus named Theopompus intrudes into the allied territories in Apuleia. Valerius doubts the ultimate loyalty of the Roman allies, and after counselling with his friends he sees no choice but to reaffirm Roman dominance. He gathers his legion and marches into Magna Graecia, intent on subduing the enemies of the Senate and People of Rome. Near Venusia, he catches the Greek and quickly disperses his troops.



    As the captured enemies appear to consist mainly of Samnites, he sets an example for all those intent on defeating Rome. He sends them under the yoke, letting them return to the city of Tarentum in shame. When informers tell him the city is lightly garrisoned, he remembers the words of Dentatus. Rome will never be safe until King Pyrrhus is driven from Magna Graecia. He marches for the city.



    Campaigning in Samnium, the consuls are troubled by the growing instability of the Roman socii. They send a dispatch to the senate, requesting them to be permitted to hold a new levy. They also require the allies to reaffirm their loyalty by contributing to the Roman war effort. Surely, it is in the interest of all socii to ensure the peace and stability of their most trustworthy protector.



    In autumn, Valerius lays siege to the city of Tarentum. He prepares his soldiers for the winter months. Milon, the governor left behind by Pyrrhus, guardian of the citadel of Tarentum, enlists the aid of more men for his defence. Impressed by the preparations of the Greek, Valerius decides it is too early to attack, and bides his time. Meanwhile, he sends the Roman fleet to blockade the port of Brundisium, hoping to prevent reinforcements from overseas.



    With winter approaching, Regulus decides to stay in Rome. His motives are twofold: first and foremost, his recent victories give him a great opportunity to be elected praetor for the following year; second, his new found mistress, a Roman noblewoman, demands much attention. Regulus was impressed by the vigour and obedience of young Cotta in the battle at Aletrium, and bestows upon him the task of leading the legion. Their destination is Capua, where another young potential, the arrogant Lucius Cornelius Scipio, is camped with the new recruits and allied troops. After this rendezvous, their orders are to bring the legions South to support the campaign of the following year.



    In Tarentum, winter prevents Valerius to charge the city walls. He is patient, and as long as King Pyrrhus does not come to the relief of his allies, time is on his side.


    It is the year of the consulship of Gaius Quinctius Claudus and Lucius Genucius Clepsina.
    Additionally, Marcus Atilius Regulus enters the office of praetor. Cnaeus Cornelius Scipio Asina is admitted to the senate after his successful quaestorship, in which he oversaw the administration in the subjugated region of Umbria. The gods granted him a son: Decimus Cornelius Scipio. His brother Lucius decides to return to Rome, to campaign for the quaestorship of the following year.
    With his imperium, Regulus decides to temporarily leave his mistress and takes control over the army camped at Capua. Aside from his adultery, he is an honest man, and decides to take the army to the propraetor Valerius to help him in the conquests in Magna Graecia.



    In summer, Lucius Cornelius Scipio, like his brother before him, is granted a son. He names him Caius.
    While Valerius still awaits the arrival of Regulus, the senatorial legate Caius Fabius Licinus arrives in Thermon, where King Pyrrhus is holding court. With him he brings the demands of the senate for immediate retreat from Magna Graecia. At first, the proud king refuses the generous terms offered by the Senate. Fabius, knowing his opinion will be swayed with the loss of his base of operations across the sea, remains at court for now.



    Confronted with Samnite rebels on his way to Valerius, Regulus dutifully disposes of them but therefore fails to reach Tarentum before the end of summer.
    Back in Roma, the assembled Populus votes to station garrisons in the vicinity of big towns in Latium. No one shall reprimand the Romans for failing to protect farmers and traders from banditry. Besides, the presence of legions some miles outside their gates can dissuade certain unruly towns from revolting once more.



    In autumn, Regulus finally reaches the gulf of Tarentum and quickly dispatches a messenger to the propraetor Valerius. He is ready, and will arrive presently to vigorously press the attack. Content, Valerius orders the troops to march forward, resolved to capture the city before the come of winter.



    This time, they have the numerical advantage, but the walls will not be easily breached.
    The reinforcements arrive quickly, and Valerius, patient and cautious as ever, waits for them to arrive to bolster his forces.



    The two generals meet on the field of battle, and after courteously greeting one another, agree to give the signal. Tarentum shall soon fall for the might of Rome!



    Yet war is fought by soldiers, soldiers who love and fear and bleed. Three columns are sent forth: the left and right will scale the walls, while the central force shall break the gates of the mighty town. To the dismay of the leftmost assailants, the faint light of autumn reflects on long spears waiting for them atop the Tarentine walls. Yet their duty is not to their lives, but to the divine Rome. Their ancestors prevailed upon foes more fierce than this - surely they can do the same?



    Driven forth by bravery and the cries of their superiors, the rightmost flank has begun climbing the long ladders. As their comrades stream over the battlements uncontested, their hearts are filled with valor and their arms are granted strength.



    The Romans on the left have scaled the walls as well, but cannot defend from the long spears wielded by the phalangitai. Seeing no way onto the ramparts, iron points seeking their deaths on every moment, they quickly break.



    Their compatriots at the gates are in grave danger too. No sooner have the hinges of the Tarentine gate given their last scream, as the Epirote cavalry streams through the broken wood. Their sally decimates the regiment of the Romans, which scurries from the ram. Meanwhile, the attackers on the right are steadily driving their foe back, even if surrounded on two sides.



    Yet here the Roman generals intervene once more, sending the remainder of their troops to intervene in the precarious situation. The equites quickly arrive and rout the sallying Greeks.



    They do not fail to exploit the advantage granted them. Furious, the soldiers stream through the gate, destroying a second mounted regiment waiting behind the splintered gates of Tarentum.



    The attackers on the walls vigorously fight on, relieved by the arrival of fresh troops. Ever so slightly, they push the resisting enemies back, sending them fleeing from the walls or speedily to their graves. In these struggles, the enemy general Milon is slain. The attackers rush to the city centre.





    With the Roman troops between the heavy phalangitai and the citadel, the Greeks quickly lose heart and flee. The day is won, and so is the city of Tarentum!



    Generously, the propraetor Valerius accepts the surrender of the city and deposes the current government.



    The praetor Regulus, in the meantime, marches out to subdue the remainder of Kalabria, including the cities of Brundisium, Hydruntum, Lupiae, and Uria. The pacification claims more lives, surely, but what happier lives they will be, free from the despotic whims of a Greek King. With his defeat in Magna Graecia clear for all the world to see, King Pyrrhus quickly decides against enduring the lasting enmity of Rome. Once more, the world clearly sees our might, and even our allies will do good to remember it well.



    However, as winter falls over the Apennine mountains, the next target is already clear. Having been unable to deal with him previously, the legions are now able to bring justice to the traitor Decimus Decius Vibellius. The town of Rhegium serves as his stronghold, but it will not for long.






    For more information on EB II on the org: https://forums.totalwar.org/vb/forum...-Barbarorum-II
    Last edited by Ailfertes; 05-15-2014 at 17:47.

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  2. #2
    Member Member Docus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Great!

  3. #3
    Infinite Jest Member easytarget's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Thanks for posting that, I cannot wait!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Hmm. Did I miss something or are there no permanent stone forts on that map?

  5. #5
    EBII Council Senior Member Kull's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Somnorum View Post
    Hmm. Did I miss something or are there no permanent stone forts on that map?
    We're running some tests to see how the AI operates without PSFs. They will probably be back for the first release.
    "Numidia Delenda Est!"

  6. #6

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Thanks so much.Looks amazing.

    I love how Pyrrhos has the Makedonian hairstyle. Its detail like that which makes EB 2 worth waiting for.

  7. #7
    Assassins Guild Member The Outsider's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Oh my.. Kull thanks a lot mate. You guys just made my day. So much detail, its beautifull. Not only the units but the campaign map also. After seeing how bland Rome 2 was, I almost forgot how a real total war game should look like. This is what we have been waiting for. Thank you all guys for everything you have done for the community.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Do the Romani use the Teutonic Order family system?

  9. #9
    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Of course not!

    Romans are represented by three rival families (Scipii, Brutii and Julii) who vie for power among themselves and over the Senate.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    I am kidding of course, but the truth is that Romans do not use the Teutonic system and have normal family tree instead.
    Last edited by V.T. Marvin; 05-19-2014 at 05:52.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Everything is looking GLORIOUS!
    Also great job with the AAR writing, Ailfertes

    Syntagma formation on walls, ouch!
    Last edited by LusitanianWolf; 05-19-2014 at 21:50.



  11. #11
    Strategist and Storyteller Member Myth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    I prefer the real and authentic look of this engine to the stylized web 3.0 looking Rome 2 with its new buildings and unit cards that remind me of a smartphone menu.

    I can only hope that when Rome II is fully moddable (as CA has promised) we can get EB 2.5 for RII.
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    These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth;
    (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.
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    Uergobretos Senior Member Brennus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Myth View Post
    I can only hope that when Rome II is fully moddable (as CA has promised) we can get EB 2.5 for RII.



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  13. #13

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Nothing like a lovely AAR to remind us of what it is we're waiting for! And it looks fantastic.
    ξυνς 'Evυλιoς κa τε κτανoντα κατκτα
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    Member Member Paltmull's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Brennus View Post

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

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  15. #15

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    I like the UI. The Roman UI was the only one I didn't like in EB becasue of it's red, everywhere.

    If I understand correctly you removed the plalanx secondery weapon to avoid them to systematically switch to it and break their formation ?

  16. #16
    EBII Bricklayer Member V.T. Marvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Alcibiade View Post
    If I understand correctly you removed the plalanx secondery weapon to avoid them to systematically switch to it and break their formation ?
    That is correct.

  17. #17
    Member Member Docus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by V.T. Marvin View Post
    That is correct.
    How do they fight in close combat?

  18. #18

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by V.T. Marvin View Post
    Of course not!

    Romans are represented by three rival families (Scipii, Brutii and Julii) who vie for power among themselves and over the Senate.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    I am kidding of course, but the truth is that Romans do not use the Teutonic system and have normal family tree instead.
    That's ... disappointing. And unrealistic. What motivated the decision?

  19. #19
    master of the wierd people Member Ibrahim's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Somnorum View Post
    That's ... disappointing. And unrealistic. What motivated the decision?
    the phalangites don't just switch to swords when the enemy gets past their sarissas. instead, they draw swords well before that. yeah, I know, it is dumb, but there's little that can be done for the time being.
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  20. #20

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibrahim View Post
    the phalangites don't just switch to swords when the enemy gets past their sarissas. instead, they draw swords well before that. yeah, I know, it is dumb, but there's little that can be done for the time being.
    OK, thanks for that information, very helpful.

    I really, really hate seeing a phalanx formation on a wall though. When EB2 is released, I'm never going to assault walled cities that have a phalanx unit as part of the garrison. Instead I'll just seige and wait for them to sally out. I think that's historically realistic, as phalanx units are so powerful when blocking a city street, that assaulting would be a bad idea anyway.
    Last edited by Titus Marcellus Scato; 06-27-2014 at 11:49.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Re-Release Subject: An Europa Barbarorum II AAR, Roma

    Those RTW portraits hurt my eyes. I wish we could use CK2.

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