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Thread: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

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    Ni dieu ni maître! Senior Member a completely inoffensive name's Avatar
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    Default Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    Link: https://www.economist.com/news/leade...call-time-life

    If you do not have access (cheapskate): Advances in longevity have added healthy years in the 60+ category that were not available to previous generations. Due to the reduction in Western birthrates, the "ratio of 65-plussers to working age people will triple by 2100". These people should be categorized as a new stage of life, separate from the decrepit end-of-lifers that is currently attached to all citizens past retirement. This has already happened in the 20th century when the concept of a 'teenager' created new marketing and social standards for a segment of society previously lumped with childhood or adulthood. Oh, and they should be called 'Owls' (Older, Working Less, Still earning).

    'Owls' is an okay term, at the very least better than the other dumb terms the author also suggested (Nyppies? I'm not saying that, I don't care what the acronym would mean). But other than that, I am wondering how many segments do we already divide people's lives into. Newborns, toddlers, children, pre-teens, teenagers, young adults (although judging by Barnes and Noble this is just a different label for teens), adults (and here we have to divide everyone further by the first digit of their age), Owls, Elders/Seniors, Centenarians (we should call these people Super Seniors or Methuselah's). I am entering a new stage of life roughly every other presidential election.

    In addition, I don't really follow the author's reasoning of applying the origin of the 'teenager' to the origin of 'Owls'. If these people are earning less/working less, then by definition they don't seem to be near as lucrative of a market as young teenagers just entering the work force. At least with marketing to teenagers, they build their brand in order to pay dividends later when those teens grow older and associate the brand with good memories of their youth. There are also key psychological developments that clearly distinguishes teenagers from the pre-teens and the adults. Anyone in their early twenties will testify how different they were from their 16-18 year old self. At 68 years old, how much does a person contrast with their 55 year old self? Maybe more than I realize as someone still many decades from making that call for myself.

    I am sure sure that in some way, the author's notion of a new 'period' of life somewhere in your late 60's to early 70's will be widespread ; but it's not going to be the image of an older couple enjoying their bonus years on a beach. More likely the concept of the 'Owls' will be the image of a pair of forgotten Gen Xer's constantly screwed by the larger generations before and after them. A couple who now live in a society where the remaining Baby Boomers and heartless millennials pull the rug out from under their feet to redefine the Social Security Retirement Age as 74 years old, while taxing them to pay for Bernie's Free College Fund.

    Why am I talking about this random article? Your guess is as good as mine, perhaps the baseless optimism bugged me somehow. Or maybe I am just sick of talking about Trump and Brexit all the time.
    Last edited by a completely inoffensive name; 08-05-2017 at 07:48.
    In all these papers we see a love of honest work, an aversion to shams, a caution in the enunciation of conclusions, a distrust of rash generalizations and speculations based on uncertain premises. He was never anxious to add one more guess on doubtful matters in the hope of hitting the truth, or what might pass as such for a time, but was always ready to take infinite pains in the most careful testing of every theory. With these qualities was united a modesty which forbade the pushing of his own claims and desired no reputation except the unsought tribute of competent judges.

  2. #2
    master of the pwniverse Member Fragony's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    Owls look straight and directly. Read the book for fun's sake, it's pretty wtf.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    redefine the Social Security Retirement Age as 74 years old, while taxing them to pay for Bernie's Free College Fund.
    I think one of these might rule out the other. Even if it were part of the Democratic agenda to fund youth through old-age austerity, it wouldn't be politically viable from either prong.

    Re: The Economist's editorial optimism, one of the best things you can say about the publication is that the online comments are a league ahead of what you see in the WSJ, and a couple of leagues ahead of The Federalist.
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    Darkside Medic Senior Member rory_20_uk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    It is pretty simple - die early, work for longer or live an incredibly frugal life; we've decided (in the UK at least) that leaving school later is "helpful". We're up to 18 but increasingly leaving saddled with debt at 21. For many people, learning a vocation at 16 - or even 14 - might be a better approach.

    Why the silly terms? Drivel like that keeps academics employed.

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    Praefectus Fabrum Senior Member Anime BlackJack Champion, Flash Poker Champion, Word Up Champion, Shape Game Champion, Snake Shooter Champion, Fishwater Challenge Champion, Rocket Racer MX Champion, Jukebox Hero Champion, My House Is Bigger Than Your House Champion, Funky Pong Champion, Cutie Quake Champion, Fling The Cow Champion, Tiger Punch Champion, Virus Champion, Solitaire Champion, Worm Race Champion, Rope Walker Champion, Penguin Pass Champion, Skate Park Champion, Watch Out Champion, Lawn Pac Champion, Weapons Of Mass Destruction Champion, Skate Boarder Champion, Lane Bowling Champion, Bugz Champion, Makai Grand Prix 2 Champion, White Van Man Champion, Parachute Panic Champion, BlackJack Champion, Stans Ski Jumping Champion, Smaugs Treasure Champion, Sofa Longjump Champion Seamus Fermanagh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    Quote Originally Posted by rory_20_uk View Post
    It is pretty simple - die early, work for longer or live an incredibly frugal life; we've decided (in the UK at least) that leaving school later is "helpful". We're up to 18 but increasingly leaving saddled with debt at 21. For many people, learning a vocation at 16 - or even 14 - might be a better approach.

    Why the silly terms? Drivel like that keeps academics employed.

    No. Drivel like that is the product of an academic seeking a "catchy" metaphor for the introduction to an otherwise tedious article rife with matrices and statistics. Academics are NOT poets for a reason.
    "The only way that has ever been discovered to have a lot of people cooperate together voluntarily is through the free market. And that's why it's so essential to preserving individual freedom.” -- Milton Friedman

    "The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule." -- H. L. Mencken

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    Ja-mata TosaInu

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    Ni dieu ni maître! Senior Member a completely inoffensive name's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    Quote Originally Posted by Montmorency View Post
    I think one of these might rule out the other. Even if it were part of the Democratic agenda to fund youth through old-age austerity, it wouldn't be politically viable from either prong.

    Re: The Economist's editorial optimism, one of the best things you can say about the publication is that the online comments are a league ahead of what you see in the WSJ, and a couple of leagues ahead of The Federalist.
    America has made worse compromises before.

    I do agree about the comments.
    In all these papers we see a love of honest work, an aversion to shams, a caution in the enunciation of conclusions, a distrust of rash generalizations and speculations based on uncertain premises. He was never anxious to add one more guess on doubtful matters in the hope of hitting the truth, or what might pass as such for a time, but was always ready to take infinite pains in the most careful testing of every theory. With these qualities was united a modesty which forbade the pushing of his own claims and desired no reputation except the unsought tribute of competent judges.

  8. #8
    master of the pwniverse Member Fragony's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    It's basicly porn, there is nothing clever in it. De Sade was clever, here is nothing to be found . The comments annoy me, things that stuck under my shoes annoy me as well

  9. #9
    Praefectus Fabrum Senior Member Anime BlackJack Champion, Flash Poker Champion, Word Up Champion, Shape Game Champion, Snake Shooter Champion, Fishwater Challenge Champion, Rocket Racer MX Champion, Jukebox Hero Champion, My House Is Bigger Than Your House Champion, Funky Pong Champion, Cutie Quake Champion, Fling The Cow Champion, Tiger Punch Champion, Virus Champion, Solitaire Champion, Worm Race Champion, Rope Walker Champion, Penguin Pass Champion, Skate Park Champion, Watch Out Champion, Lawn Pac Champion, Weapons Of Mass Destruction Champion, Skate Boarder Champion, Lane Bowling Champion, Bugz Champion, Makai Grand Prix 2 Champion, White Van Man Champion, Parachute Panic Champion, BlackJack Champion, Stans Ski Jumping Champion, Smaugs Treasure Champion, Sofa Longjump Champion Seamus Fermanagh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thoughts on Economist article "Over 65 Shades of Grey"

    Quote Originally Posted by Fragony View Post
    It's basicly porn, there is nothing clever in it. De Sade was clever, here is nothing to be found . The comments annoy me, things that stuck under my shoes annoy me as well
    "The only way that has ever been discovered to have a lot of people cooperate together voluntarily is through the free market. And that's why it's so essential to preserving individual freedom.” -- Milton Friedman

    "The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule." -- H. L. Mencken

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