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Thread: Andrew Yang

  1. #1

    Default Andrew Yang

    The 'tech dude' who built his reputation as one of the marginal non-politician candidates during the 2020 Democratic primaries decided to run for mayor of New York (to succeed Bill de Blasio after this year). He's enjoyed a lead in polling from the beginning but now, less than 7 weeks from the Democratic primary election, it could be said he's running neck-and-neck with Eric Adams, a conservative Democrat and a veteran of the state party.

    (There is a debate today at 7 PM EDT between the 8 leading Democratic candidates, if anyone cares.)


    Yang projects a dorky and affable persona, but this remarkable profile brings him across as something like a calculating anime character, and a politician who blends Bloomberg with de Blasio, for better or worse.

    From the moment Andrew Yang sat down in the back corner of a dark restaurant in the Bronx — brow knitted, wearing an overcoat and scarf that would stay on for the whole lunch — he was not the same cheerful New York City mayoral candidate of our popular conception, the one who cheeses for photos and tweets things like “It’s Friday!” when it’s Friday or shouts “Yankee Stadium!” while standing in front of Yankee Stadium. Politicians are always a little different behind the scenes, their ambition harder to conceal in close quarters, but the man sitting across from me was particularly unfamiliar. Since entering the race in January, Yang has pitched himself as the happy warrior for the Everyman, an energetic presence promising to lead New York out of its grim recent past. While other candidates have emphasized the city’s need for an experienced and empathic crisis manager, Yang has acted like a constant human joy machine.

    But today, he was serious, even a little crabby. Gone was the man who wants to bring TikTok Hype Houses to New York; he was replaced by a bristly high achiever, albeit one who has a habit of punctuating somber statements with outbursts of giggles. I asked him, Did other people ever note this difference?

    “I really appreciate the line of inquiry,” Yang said. (He actually seemed mildly offended by it.) “I think people underestimate what a disciplined operator [1] I am.”

    “Anyone who’s an operator sees me and this campaign and says, ‘Oh, I get it, Andrew Yang’s an operator,’ ” he continued. “And then if you put a businessperson next to me for ten minutes — or, I’m guessing, the vast majority of people who also are operators — they get it. Like, we speak the same language.”Yang, 46, seemed to be saying he wasn’t just the goofy, smart guy from the 2020 presidential-debate stage who wore a MATH pin that made some fellow Asian Americans cringe. Yang — he of Phillips Exeter, Brown, Columbia, white-shoe law, start-up wealth [2], godfatherdom to Teddy Roosevelt’s direct descendant — could hang with the city’s power brokers.

    He also appeared eager to reflect the value systems of those places of power: Yang, who calls himself the anti-poverty candidate based largely on his proposal for annual $2,000 direct payments to the poorest New Yorkers, said he envisioned himself spending his first six months in office luring back the city’s elite by calling the many Masters of the Universe who have recently decamped to Florida.

    “ ‘Like, what are the issues that drove you out? What were the decisions?’ And then be like, okay, here are, like, the things that drove people away. If we resolve them, can we get them back?” he had told me previously. “It’s a pretty tight community, so if the mayor is calling people asking these questions and trying to get them back, I think there are a lot of people who would be thrilled about it.”

    He slurped black spaghetti, continuing to sketch out his ambitions for the early days of his mayoralty. Aside from working the phones, his plans were vague. He was fuzzy about how exactly he would be able to wrest more control from Albany over the subways: “I haven’t had those conversations.” He said he thinks the MTA board should be altered to give the city more power, which sounds simple enough but, close up, is an incredibly complicated political proposition. One concrete move Yang knows he wants to make is to hire Kathryn Garcia [3], the former head of the Department of Sanitation and one of his rivals in the race. “What I appreciate about Kathryn is that she’s an operator,” he told me. He’s big on the idea that he would hire the right people to do the job, just like Michael Bloomberg did.

    Yang said he calls Garcia at least once a week to say, “Hey, Kathryn, we’re gonna need you.”
    (It’s true he calls a lot, according to her campaign. “Makes her crazy,” said Christine Quinn [4] of the implications that Garcia should be Yang’s No. 2. Quinn was the front-runner in the 2013 mayor’s race until Bill de Blasio overtook her in the final weeks.)

    [1] "Operator" usually has two usages. The first is similar to the sense of "fixer"; the second has been popularized post-War-on-Terror in reference to special operations forces (cf. commando).
    [2] Yang's net worth only starts at $1 million though, placing him in the petite bourgeoisie
    [3] Garcia is one of Yang's competitors in the primary, who received the New York Times' endorsement this week.
    [4] Former City Council speaker


    The profile leaves me with a higher regard for Yang's cunning, potentially intelligence, but less regard for his wisdom and values.
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  2. #2
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    I dont have a horse in the NYC mayoral race, but I gotta say that profile is very interesting and while I dont watch enough anime to get the reference, I do kinda now see how he might be a blend of Bloomberg with de Blasio. Though I still think his UBI plan is trash.
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    Senior Member Senior Member ReluctantSamurai's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Judging by his recent comments on the situation in Gaza, Yang isn't too worried about the Lebanese vote in NYC...
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  4. #4
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Quote Originally Posted by ReluctantSamurai View Post
    Judging by his recent comments on the situation in Gaza, Yang isn't too worried about the Lebanese vote in NYC...
    Well considering that nearly 10% of New Yorkers are Jewish, I'd say it was a smart move.
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    Senior Member Senior Member ReluctantSamurai's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    I'd say it was a smart move
    Then he should change his party status to Republican. That kind of BS is more suited to that ilk....
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    My first choice in the race had a dubious proposal last night:

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    End the practice of health inspections without warning of food service establishments, because they're too burdensome. Inspection should instead be scheduled, because restaurants have nothing to hide and no one really gets sick from food eaten out in New York anyway.


    But she's in single digits anyway.

    Yang is for the most part an uncomfortably-conservative candidate, an ideological centrist, so the fact that he and Adams (on the traditional conservative flank of the party) seem to have together at least half the first-order preferences of the base suggests a conservative mood in the electorate.

    I'd rather have him than Adams though, since Yang is less conservative, and his contradistinctive (to Adams) lack of attachment to the New York party infrastructure should make him easier to turf out for bad performance, in 2025, even as it promises to reduce his governing effectiveness.

    Quote Originally Posted by ReluctantSamurai View Post
    Judging by his recent comments on the situation in Gaza, Yang isn't too worried about the Lebanese vote in NYC...
    I wouldn't say so. Yang has from time to time bragged about building support with Orthodox Jews in Brooklyn, and overall the size of the Jewish voting bloc in New York is probably 10, 20, 30 times that of Lebanese New Yorkers. Not to mention that Lebanese-Americans will tend to be more indifferent about Palestinians given their ethnic makeup and domestic priorities. Yang knows how to pander, I think.

    For example, this quote from Yang:

    Yang makes a point of ignoring progressive social media, where he’s frequently derided as either a neoliberal menace or a clueless tourist. “One of the big numbers that informs me is that approximately 11 percent of New York City Democratic voters get their news from Twitter,” he said, referring to a figure from his campaign’s internal polling. “If you pay attention to social media you’re going to get a particular look at New Yorkers that is going to be representative of frankly a relatively small percentage of New York voters.”


    Quote Originally Posted by Hooahguy View Post
    Well considering that nearly 10% of New Yorkers are Jewish, I'd say it was a smart move.
    Even more, and the center of gravity of Jewish New York today is Orthodox and/or post-Soviet (although, and I'm pretty ignorant of this doctrinal stuff, some subset of Hasidics "don't believe" in Israel).
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Senior Member ReluctantSamurai's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Andrew Yang tweet from 10 May:

    I'm standing with the people of Israel who are coming under bombardment attacks, and condemn the Hamas terrorists. The people of NYC will always stand with our brothers and sisters in Israel who face down terrorism and persevere.
    Several things here:

    1) Andrew Yang is an incredibly ignorant individual, completely unaware of who the aggressor here is---not likely, IMO, but I know little of the man.

    2) Andrew Yang is behaving like a typical corporate politician in that he's willing to say anything that fits with which way the wind is blowing---more likely, IMO.

    I'm not a resident of NYC, so I couldn't care less about who becomes mayor. Having said that, if #2 above is the case, I would hate to see how he behaves as NYC Mayor if a large moneyed entity (be it government or corporation) that sets itself upon a weak minority within the city. Does he stand up for the "oppressed" or does he stand with the money?

    And he's now walking back his statement:

    https://www.politico.com/states/new-...-tweet-1381442

    I would not vote for him....
    Last edited by ReluctantSamurai; 05-15-2021 at 03:29.
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  8. #8
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Quote Originally Posted by Montmorency View Post
    some subset of Hasidics "don't believe" in Israel).
    Contrary to public belief its a very tiny subset.

    I think Yang learned one of the lessons of 2020- twitter is not the electorate.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Senior Member ReluctantSamurai's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    At least Yang knows something about housing prices in NYC...which can't be said about Donovan and Mcguire:

    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/arti...-question.html

    Last edited by ReluctantSamurai; 05-16-2021 at 17:21.
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  10. #10
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    I know this thread is focused on Yang's campaign, but Dianne Morales' campaign seems to be kind of a trainwreck as a bunch of her staffers march on her offices after a unionization attempt that got squashed by her campaign. Yeesh.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    We'll see if the old adage that New York mayors "come from nowhere and go nowhere" holds up.

    The leading candidate is the conservative machine politician Adams, followed closely by Yang and Garcia, a seasoned bureaucrat, in a tie. Will be interesting to see how the polling has done modeling the ranked choice element, an unprecedented complication for most American polling.
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  12. #12
    Member Member Xantan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Speaking of this, John Oliver has covered him on the segment this week.


  13. #13

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Man, what a weird mayoral race. Initially Yang was #1 on name recognition, then the establishment conservative Adams steadily rose to overmatch him, then the establishment progressive Stringer was knocked down by sexual misconduct allegations, which along with the NYT's endorsement put Garcia in second place, then AOC endorsed Wiley a couple weeks ago and shot her into second place from the single-digit doldrums. But for up to two months Adams has been the presumptive frontrunner. Serious 2020 Democratic presidential primary vibes. Or maybe this is just what a crowded, divided field inevitably looks like.

    Last 8 polls (mean)
    Adams 23
    Garcia 16
    Wiley 17.5
    Yang 14

    Of the 6 polls this month with ranked choice simulations, one is an Adams-leaning tie against Garcia plus two are Garcia-leaning ties (all with Wiley in third place), and in the remainder Adams beats Yang, Garcia, and Wiley, respectively, by landslides (with still Wiley in third place when not facing off against Adams). Ranked choice polling doesn't have much precedent in this country, and New York City local primaries notoriously involve <10% of the electorate, so it will be interesting to observe how accurate they prove in the final stretch.

    Note that if any candidates were to choose to drop out now, by our election policy they would remain on the ballot IIRC.


    Most provocative statement of the last debate came from Yang:

    ...We need to rebuild the stock of psych beds so that there's some place to bring them and - make sure that if they are in supportive housing, they're being monitored so that they take their meds. Yes, mentally ill people have rights, but you know who else have rights? We do - the people and families of the city. We have the right to walk the street and not fear for our safety because a mentally-ill person is going to lash out at us.
    Sounds personal, yikes. Anyway, it's looking unlikely now that Yang can even reach third place.

    Meanwhile...





    OT Scary fact: Brazil is now half Catholic, one-third Evangelical. It will likely be majority Evangelical by the mid-century.
    Last edited by Montmorency; 06-19-2021 at 18:10.
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  14. #14
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Monty, what do you make of this article?

    The NYC Mayor’s Race Is a Warning for Progressives

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    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, one of the most prominent progressive politicians in the country, warned last week that her hometown is at high risk of having a decidedly moderate mayor. Standing in New York’s City Hall Park to deliver a last-minute endorsement of Maya Wiley, a civil-rights lawyer who’d previously struggled to crack the top tier, Ocasio-Cortez urged the left to come together. “We have the candidates in the field, and it’s time for us to make a choice,” she said. “We cannot afford to sit on the sidelines. We can’t afford to not engage because of what could have been. We engage in the world that we have.”

    The forces driving a likely moderate outcome in the June 22 Democratic primary are varied; many are specific to New York and to this election. But the race also contains major warning signs for progressives across the country. If the left loses out in the city arguably leading the socialist revival in the United States, it will be, at least in part, because of dramatic infighting fueled by rigid positions on sexual and social-justice politics, as well as the generalized failure to unify behind one candidate alluded to by Ocasio-Cortez.

    A poll released on Monday had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and the former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang as the front-runners. Wiley had just 9 percent support, putting her in fifth place. A fresher survey released Wednesday had Wiley in second, just in front of Yang and behind Adams, signaling the value of Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement. Both of those polls also showed the number of people supporting three different progressive candidates is the largest bloc in the city. But, if they don’t consolidate, with just a few days left, Wiley may not have time to take the lead.

    Although Adams and Yang qualify as clear Democrats by national standards, they are bêtes noires for the city’s progressives. Adams was a registered Republican in the 1990s and has run a tough-on-crime campaign promising to be a “blue-collar mayor.” Yang has built his campaign on his business background and the language of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship. Both Yang and Adams have received donations from right-wing figures including hedge-funders and conservative think-tankers. Yang’s super PAC even scored $15,000 from the former Trump administration official Anthony Scaramucci earlier this month.

    It wasn’t supposed to be this way for the left in New York. Early on in the race, City Comptroller Scott Stringer was right alongside Adams and Yang at the top of the polls and in fundraising. Stringer had firmly positioned himself as the race’s leading progressive with the support of the city’s most prominent left-leaning lawmakers, including many of Ocasio-Cortez’s allies in Albany and Washington. His pitch to voters includes a focus on climate change and a sweeping universal affordable-housing plan.

    But just as Stringer was gaining momentum in late April, a former unpaid worker accused him of sexual misconduct. The allegation—despite several clear inconsistencies—caused him to hemorrhage progressive endorsers, many of whom have been vocal advocates for women critics of sexual harassment in the political sphere. A second woman came forward earlier this month to accuse Stringer of “sexual harassment and making unwanted advances” when she worked at a bar he operated nearly 30 years ago. Stringer vehemently denied the first accusation and dismissed the second as part of “a long-ago chapter in my life from the early 1990s” that “was all a bit of a mess.”

    The situation raises questions about asymmetrical warfare. Republicans—even evangelicals—stayed largely united behind President Donald Trump as he faced a slew of allegations of sexual assault. And New York’s Democratic governor, Andrew Cuomo (another moderate villain in the state’s progressive circles), has not only declined to step aside but maintained support among many centrist allies after racking up a long list of accusers.

    A landscape where moderates and conservatives survive #MeToo scandals while progressives implode is clearly dangerous for the left. Rebecca Katz, a leading progressive consultant who is advising Stringer’s campaign, has felt deeply conflicted about the issue and suggests that the left needs introspection on this front.

    “We need to have a real conversation about what is and what is not disqualifying,” Katz told me. “Because applying inconsistent standards, depending on the politics and party involved, isn’t serving anyone.”

    If progressives do reevaluate their posture, however, change will almost certainly come too late for Stringer. The above-mentioned polls showed him in fourth and fifth place, respectively.

    And Stringer isn’t the only progressive in New York’s mayoral mix wounded by the left’s uncompromising push for purity. One would-be beneficiary of Stringer’s demise, Dianne Morales, was similarly unable to live up to progressive standards.

    Morales is a nonprofit executive and relative newcomer to electoral politics in the city. She has attracted attention in large part thanks to having the most aggressively progressive platform—and rhetorical style—of anyone in the race. Although the policy section on her campaign site is thinner than those of many rivals, Morales has unabashedly called for defunding the New York Police Department and describes her priorities as “dignity” and “solidarity.” After the first Stringer accuser came forward, Morales responded with lefty buzzwords.

    “It’s a really unfortunate moment in this race,” Morales said in an interview. “As a survivor myself, who’s got a femme-led team, many of whom are also survivors, we’ve all been triggered.”

    Although progressive language helped Morales at first, she found that same sort of language used against her when her staffers attempted to unionize, following allegations of abusive behavior, long hours, and low pay. Morales, who would be the city’s first Afro-Latina mayor, responded in part by firing four staffers involved with the effort. A Twitter account run by the organizers focused on the race and gender of the people who were ousted.

    “Black women were harmed, pass it on,” they wrote.

    Morales staffers and volunteers ultimately staged protests against their own candidate. They lit sage and incense outside her office and urged her to donate $1 million from her campaign coffers to mutual-aid groups, a decidedly unrealistic demand that would almost certainly violate city campaign-finance law. On Wednesday, Morales responded by firing more than 50 members of her team, leaving her with a skeleton crew. A campaign that was already a long shot had definitively imploded.

    Democratic strategists around the country watched the spectacle of young workers marching on their own office, and some saw it as a clear indicator of the dangers of trying to bring Generation Z into the fold of grueling campaign work. One veteran Democratic operative who has worked on presidential campaigns articulated these fears to me via text message.

    “It seems like many of these kids would be shocked and upset at just normal boring office jobs and the expectations there. And campaigns are so much harder than that,” wrote the operative, who requested anonymity because of professional concerns.

    Morales’s situation raised the possibility that young progressives are unwilling to make the sort of labor commitments necessary to actually elect a progressive. That said, much of the Morales drama was specific to the candidate. Other campaigns have unionized successfully, including Ocasio-Cortez’s. In fact, progressives in New York might argue that all of their apparent troubles in the mayoral race are candidate-specific, and not in any way indicative of the movement’s strengths or weaknesses. They might also argue that the mayoral candidates simply don’t represent progressives’ most promising prospects in the city.

    Sure, they failed to rally around Stringer. But is Stringer really that progressive? He was dubbed a “moderate” and “middle of the line Democrat” by The New Republic as recently as 2013. Morales also—thanks to her past support for charter schools and her history as an allegedly “negligent” landlord—has faced questions about whether her politics are genuine. Even Wiley, who now remains the left’s last real hope in this race, has had to confront difficult questions about her previous work in the administration of the current mayor, Bill de Blasio, including what the Daily News described as a “more moderate pose” on police issues.

    Progressive strength lies elsewhere. The left has already won a number of elections in New York, which has a growing socialist cadre in both the state legislature and city council. However, because many of New York’s rising progressive stars were elected only recently, they were poorly positioned to run for mayor. That’s partly why the Democratic Socialists of America, an organization whose on-the-ground volunteers helped drive many of these recent wins, sat out the mayoral race entirely. Cea Weaver, a member of the DSA’s housing committee, told me that the city’s top socialists are focusing on trying to “build our bench” by backing candidates for the city council.

    The progressive stars who stayed on the sidelines this time around will almost certainly get some new reinforcements on Election Day—even if they don’t manage to take city hall. The DSA has backed six council candidates and two other hopefuls running for office upstate. Ocasio-Cortez has also identified 60 candidates—including a handful who oppose each other—that have pledged to back some of her policy priorities.

    If Wiley falls short and the mayor’s race is a defeat for the city’s insurgent left, progressives remain well positioned for the future. But in New York and elsewhere, they may have to settle for imperfect champions.


    I cant really speak to local NY politics, but the part about purity politics speaks true to me and I dont doubt the bit about Gen Z with unrealistic expectations about campaign work (though I am sure every generation had this to an extent). I myself have never worked on a campaign, but a lot of my friends have and they told me its extremely difficult work with low to nonexistent pay and 14-hour days. While a lot of young people join campaigns as idealists, the burnout rate is high and many only do it for one cycle before finding other lines of work. A hardy few make campaigns their career if they arent angling for a job with the candidate upon victory. But the difficulties of campaign work tends not to be communicated, for obvious reasons. Just another thing that people have to learn the hard way I guess.
    Last edited by Hooahguy; 06-19-2021 at 19:34.
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    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    It popped up to me in the news about the NYC race as well, particularly about the candidate with the union-busting while reading it on Bloomberg.

    It felt a bit surreal. This is essentially what the progressive platform is campaigning about and to go on a union-busting move, straight out of a mega-corporation playbook, was not just ironic but also comical. Even more, it was covered rather extensively in business newspapers because it made "business tactics" in a non-profit, mayoral campaign, which campaigns exactly against this.

    Also, one thing to note - despite some of the NYC members of Congress who are very very popular, NYC is not just progressives. I don't find it surprising that they're electing another centrist when essentially the whole city is a mix of cultures and viewpoints.
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Quote Originally Posted by Hooahguy View Post
    Monty, what do you make of this article?

    The NYC Mayor’s Race Is a Warning for Progressives



    I cant really speak to local NY politics, but the part about purity politics speaks true to me and I dont doubt the bit about Gen Z with unrealistic expectations about campaign work (though I am sure every generation had this to an extent). I myself have never worked on a campaign, but a lot of my friends have and they told me its extremely difficult work with low to nonexistent pay and 14-hour days. While a lot of young people join campaigns as idealists, the burnout rate is high and many only do it for one cycle before finding other lines of work. A hardy few make campaigns their career if they arent angling for a job with the candidate upon victory. But the difficulties of campaign work tends not to be communicated, for obvious reasons. Just another thing that people have to learn the hard way I guess.
    I didn't learn about the Morales campaign controversies since she was always a marginal candidate, but from what I gather she continually alienated her staff and frustrated basic unionization efforts that have passed through other campaigns without incident. Her campaign began striking when she fired leading unionizers, with Morales finally resorting to firing almost her entire staff a few weeks ago. If a candidate is at the point of literally dissolving her entire team, either she picked the worst team conceivable or she is a terrible manager. So, terrible management one way or the other. Reminder: Sanders, Warren, AOC, and myriad other progressives have apparently run unionized campaign crews without running into any alleged brick wall of Gen Z laziness and entitlement...

    The concern about lack of unity behind a single left candidate is misidentified, as this is a ranked choice contest; Wiley only needs hope that the ~10% of voters still placing Stringer and Morales at first choice have her elsewhere before Adams, which I'm sure is the case on net - it just might not be enough depending on how support for Yang and Garcia allocates.

    The question of whether distal sexual misconduct allegations, one of admited sexual harassment and another of sexual assault with unclear corroboration, should be disqualifying, is thankfully deferred by the consciousness that Stringer is far from indispensable. Evidently most of Stringer's base did consider it disqualifying, or at least deprecating, according to his steep slide in the polls. Politicians should take note, since alertness against sexually-predatory tendencies will only increase. Or to be blunt, since the Right doesn't care about this stuff and the Left does, it makes no raw political sense to pander to the opposite constituency.



    More weirdness from Yang:

    “I have a pet peeve I want to share with you,” Andrew Yang declared immediately after we were introduced on Zoom late Thursday night.

    The emotional toll of a series of setbacks that saw Yang fade from frontrunner to fourth place in some polls was evident. He leaned forward towards the camera, face taut.

    “So, Eric Adams two debates ago said what he couldn’t do without was a bubble bath,” Yang said. “When he gave reporters a tour of the basement he supposedly lives in, there is no bathtub in the basement. So, I just want people to notice there’s no bathtub.”

    [...]

    “You can tell that this is actually frustrating,” Evelyn said as she gestured towards her husband who was rocking in his chair and stewing after begging the city to pay attention to Adams’s basement bathroom. She describes herself as “more fired up” about the campaign than ever after watching what she sees as unfair and racial attacks on her husband. “You can tell I have a lot of this pent up right?” she asked with a laugh.

    [...]

    Evelyn also suggested campaigning is harder on Yang than his gleeful appearances might lead you to believe. The couple both described Yang as an introvert and she described public life as “depleting” for him.

    “To be in the spotlight as he is, that’s not where his energy comes from,” Evelyn said of her husband after he retired to bed. “He gets his energy from … being alone basically.”
    It's relatable, but dude, you shouldn't be mayor.

    As an evangelist for giving everyone money, Yang said he initially expected to be viewed as “left of Bernie” Sanders when he entered the presidential race, but instead was perceived as a “libertarian.” [...] Yang similarly believes entrenched politics are behind progressives’ reluctance to embrace him in New York, too.
    If we're talking about disqualifications, the profound lack of knowledge of politics betrayed by the expectation that a corporatist political orientation coupled with a Friedmanite signature social welfare policy would mark someone as a socialist could be one. For my next magic trick, watch me primary Ted Cruz from the right by campaigning on secular technocracy.
    Last edited by Montmorency; 06-21-2021 at 02:22.
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  17. #17
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Good point about ranked choice making polling kinda iffy. Considering how long it took NYC to get results counted for the 2020 elections, I wonder how long it will take to get the final results for this one.

    So, terrible management one way or the other. Reminder: Sanders, Warren, AOC, and myriad other progressives have apparently run unionized campaign crews without running into any alleged brick wall of Gen Z laziness and entitlement...
    I think the point was that forming a campaign union this late in the race is self-sabotaging, likely borne from a mixture of unrealistic expectations and poor upper management. Other campaigns do it just fine because they tend to do it much earlier and have at least somewhat seasoned campaign operatives at the helm.
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  18. #18

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Quote Originally Posted by Hooahguy View Post
    Good point about ranked choice making polling kinda iffy. Considering how long it took NYC to get results counted for the 2020 elections, I wonder how long it will take to get the final results for this one.


    I think the point was that forming a campaign union this late in the race is self-sabotaging, likely borne from a mixture of unrealistic expectations and poor upper management. Other campaigns do it just fine because they tend to do it much earlier and have at least somewhat seasoned campaign operatives at the helm.
    Despite continuing to have no interest in examining a doomed candidate, I'm confident these issues didn't just arise spontaneously, like her staff just got a notion at the last minute. Morales has been running for mayor since 2019.

    Speaking of which, Adams is such a sleazy asshole. Let the record show I never wavered on preferring Yang to him in the last measure.
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  19. #19

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Adams will most likely win a close victory in the end, given his current lead. Definitely in the 50-55% range. Find out in mid-July, you know how it is with New York electoral administration.

    Yang has conceded after meeting his doom as the irrevocable 4th-place candidate.

    Some astoundingly-competitive races downballot from Mayor, toss-ups.

    Turnout could reach 20%, which is considered impressive for New York primaries.

    These were funny trolls at least.


    Adams campaign kicks out New York reporter over critical article
    New York contributor David Freedlander reports he was denied entry to the Adams victory party over a critical article he wrote about the candidate last week. According to Freedlander, campaign staff approached him at the door of a venue in Williamsburg hosting the Adams party and one person said, “You’re not getting in here” before proceeding to say how the article was supposedly flawed. New York spoke with the Adams campaign prior to the publication of “The Company Eric Adams Keeps,” which quoted 30 people in New York politics — “almost all of them anonymously, citing the fear that he would soon be mayor and look to exact revenge on the mayoral front-runner’s decades in politics.” Freedlander reported on Adams’s controversial history, including his history of standing by a former lawmaker who was convicted of slashing his girlfriend and of his close connection to Frank Carone, a Democratic lawyer in Brooklyn, lobbyist, and fixer.
    *sigh*
    Last edited by Montmorency; Yesterday at 04:48.
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  20. #20
    Stranger in a strange land Moderator Hooahguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    I wonder where Yang will go from here. Hard to come back from two high profile losses, but who knows. I mean Nixon came back after a couple of high profile losses too, but Yang doesnt seem like a Nixon type.
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Andrew Yang

    Also, an wonky analysis, making such important points as:

    But voters are not required to number five preferences. Adams will have a much better chance if large numbers of voters have just chosen to mark a first preference. I would argue that is the key metric that will decide the race.

    If we want to be technical, there are three different exhaustion rates we need to consider:

    Votes that exhaust before reaching the final three (out of 26.5% of the total vote cast for the other ten candidates)
    Votes that exhaust before reaching Adams or Wiley (out of 46.0%)
    Votes that exhaust before reaching Adams or Garcia (out of 48.8%)
    This fellow seems to focus on Australian and UK elections otherwise. Anyway, I would like to point out there's a mathematically-intuitive way to reinterpret "exhaustion," which is that the top two candidates in a ranked choice contest have a certain share of the (first-order) vote, and the final tally - keeping the identity of the final two static - depends on the apportionment of 100 - [Top Two]% of the vote among them (or 100 - [Top Two] - X% where X is the exhaustion factor explicitly).

    For completeness' sake, there is one scenario, which the analyst doesn't account for (perhaps he hasn't been following the political aspects of the race).

    Yang, especially in the past month, has been intensely, visibly and vocally, opposed to Adams, and as noted previously concluded a formal ranking coalition with the NYT's endorsement, and 2nd/3rd place candidate, Garcia. To the extent that these signals influenced some proportion of both Yang and Garcia voters to, for example, rank each other *and* Wiley before Adams, or even unlist Adams entirely, then there could be a hidden anti-leader reservoir of an uncommon sort.

    A subset of this scenario would be where a tilted Yang allocation pushes Garcia past Wiley to second place, thus eliminating Wiley, and on net allocating her support more to Garcia than Adams, affording Garcia a narrow victory (because, hypothetically, Wiley voters are more likely to prioritize ideological proximity than ethnic proximity between candidates).

    It's possible, if unlikely. And here ranked choice voting was designed to obviate tactical voting...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hooahguy View Post
    I wonder where Yang will go from here. Hard to come back from two high profile losses, but who knows. I mean Nixon came back after a couple of high profile losses too, but Yang doesnt seem like a Nixon type.
    I'm not sure Yang has anything to offer anywhere in politics, and he clearly wants to start with a high position. Didn't his kids, like, start Kindergarten during his years of campaigning?

    Last edited by Montmorency; Today at 03:20.
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