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Thread: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

  1. #91

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I'm currently reading, and can definitely recommend, 'In the Name of Rome: The Men Who Won the Roman Empire' by Adrian Goldsworthy. It deals with a series of Roman Generals from the Early Republic, through to the Eastern empire.

    It's the first history book I've read since sturdying Classics GCSE but it's definitely a nice one to read alongside playing R:TW. I'm about 4/5 of the way through and it's been an enjoyable read, dealing with the likes of Scipio Africanus, Marius, Pompey, Julius Ceasar etc. He's very clear about his sources and talks about several aspects of the men's lives, focussing on their military prowess, the way they related to their men, their family lives and their political activities etc.

  2. #92
    The Sword of Rome Member Marcellus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Quote Originally Posted by Uriel
    I'm currently reading, and can definitely recommend, 'In the Name of Rome: The Men Who Won the Roman Empire' by Adrian Goldsworthy
    I would recommend it too. It is especially good at setting the generals' actions against the political and military situations of the times the generals were operating in. The best chapters are the earlier ones (covering such people as Scipio Africanus, Caesar and Pompey), since their subject matters are the most interesting!
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  3. #93
    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Hello....

    Any good books on the Khanates of Khazar, Crimeea, Volga-Bulgaria....??!
    Ja mata, TosaInu. You will forever be remembered.

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  4. #94
    Member Member lugh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I'd just like to recommend "The Crusades" by Zo Oldenbourg. It only deals with the first three Crusades, but it's a good introduction to the theme nonetheless. It's a translation from French but is extremely readable, though it does give more than sufficient detail on it's subject. What I especially liked was that it didn't simply gloss over the politics of the time to concentrate on militaria, though that was given plenty of depth aswell.

  5. #95
    Member mercian billman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    In the last few months, my interest in medieval history seemed to be revived and I've recently read;

    Ghengis Khan And The Making of The Modern World, by Jack Weatherford
    Warriors of God: Richard The Lionheart and Saladin in The Third Crusade, by James Reston Jr.

    and I recently purchased, Soldiers of The Faith: Crusaders and Moslems at War, by Ronald C. Finucane

    I was wondering if anybody could reccomend books, with an emphasis on the Crusades, Mongol Invasions, or Eastern Europe in general.

  6. #96
    zombologist Senior Member doc_bean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I just finished reading 1453 by Roger Crowly.
    It's a pretty detailed description of the siege of Byzantium and the events leading up to it (though it gets to the actual siege pretty fast). I liked it, it was well written and easy to read, it didn't slow down as much as most books on history tend to at a certain point.

    It is slightly biased towards the Ottomans, their cruelties are often and quickly compared to what was common in western Europe. I felt this was mostly done so we wouldn't demonise the ottomans to much and actually give the story more of a 'happy' ending. It certainly didn't bother me, in any case.

    I do have some questions about the historical accuracy at certain points. The author claimed the Turks got impaling from the Balkans, whilst I always assumed it was the other way around. I'm also confused about his use of 'Jihad', which he claims refers to the war of Islam against the rest of the world, supposedly ending in the total domination of Islam. I thought (the lesser) Jihad referred to a defensive war.

    But besides these little things I do recommend it, if nothing else it was a fun read
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  7. #97
    In all things, look to history Member Pontifex Rex's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Here are a few from my book shelves:

    "Roman Warfare", Adrian Goldsworthy
    "Ceasar's Legion", Stephen Dando-Collins
    John Julius Norwich's three volumes on Byzantium, "The Early Centuries", "The Apogee" and "The Decline and Fall". More detailed than the single volume 'Short History' mentioned earlier.
    "King Arthur - The True Story", Graham Phillips and Martin Keatman. As plausable as any other explanation considering lack of sources
    "Charlemagne", Roger Collins
    "Harold; The Last Anglo-Saxon King", Ian W Walker
    "1066: The Year of Three Battles", Frank McLynn
    "The Battle of Hasting", Jim Bradbury
    "Early Medieval Europe: 300-1000", Roger Collins
    "Western Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1475", Brian Tierney and Sidney Painter
    "Elanor of Aquitaine" Alison Weir
    "The War of the Roses", Alison Weir
    "The Princes in the Tower", Alison Weir
    "Medieval Cities, Their Origins and the Revival of Trade", Henri Pirenne
    "The Hundred Years War", Desmond Seward
    "The Reformation", Owen Chadwick
    "The King and the Gentleman, Charles Stuart and Oliver Cromwell 1599-1649" Derek Wilson
    Last edited by Pontifex Rex; 06-18-2006 at 19:14.
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  8. #98
    Bringing down the vulgaroisie Member King Henry V's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I just got War in the Middle Ages by Philippe Contamine, which looks good. I'll let you know once I've finished it.
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  9. #99
    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Can you recomment any good books on the Ptolemaioi?
    Ja mata, TosaInu. You will forever be remembered.

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    Swords Made of Letters - 1938. The war is looming - and Alexandre Reythier does not have much time left to protect his country.

  10. #100

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    "Anglo Saxon England: Frank Stenton
    This is it, trust me."

    Stenton may have been a grand historian but in all fairness he wrote decades ago and any commentary that old should not be taken as gospel, because with a few exceptions most historical theories are either thoroughly modified or turfed out entirely after a couple of decades.

  11. #101

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I know this falls more towards the beginning of the Early Modern period, but one of my many favorites is In Search of Dracula: The History of Dracula and Vampires by Raymond McNally and Radu Florescu.

  12. #102
    A Confused Asian Member Ayachuco's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I would like to recommend this biofiction called "Emperor" written by Conn Iggulden. Its a four part series based on Caesar's life from his childhood with Uncle Marius, to the battles in Gaul, and the final days till assasination. A very fascinating look at Caesar's life. He just published a book on Genghis Khan called "Genghis" and I would recommend it also.
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  13. #103
    king of my kingdom Member DVX BELLORVM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Anyone read The Rise and Fall of the Knights Templar, by Gordon Napier? I consider buying it, and would appreciate any comment...

  14. #104

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    BlackFireStorm,

    I have to agree, The Hundred Years War: Trial by Battle by Jonathan Sumption is an excellent book - I recently read it for an Independent Studies course on the Hundred Years' War. Also, I think Desmond Seward is a good author.

  15. #105
    Hellpuppy unleashed Member Subedei's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Great Siege: Malta 1565 (Wordsworth Military Library.) (Paperback)
    by Ernle Bradford (Author)

    A great read with some of the most impressive/scary descriptions of siege warfare.

    O.k.: Stolen from Amazon the description:
    A small group of men on a miniscule island in the Mediterranean didn't exactly stand in Suleiman`s way, but they were a bloody nuisance. They were the Knights of St. John of the Hospital, a relic of the Crusades. Driven from the Holy Land, they had settled in Rhodes and become pirates preying on Moslem shipping. The Turks had twice beseiged Rhodes and finally driven out the pesky Knights, but the Knights took refuge on Malta and continued to be a thorn in Suleiman's flesh.

    Suleiman decided to destroy them, capture Malta, and use its port as a base of operations against Europe. He sent an armada and an army to do the job, and a few thousand defenders faced off against tens of thousands of invaders.

    The Turks decided to capture the harbor first so that their ships would have a safe haven against possible storms. A small fort called Fort St. Elmo stood in their way. They figured they could overwhelm the Fort in less than a week, occupy the harbor, and the rest of the island would soon fall to their attack.

    The seige of Malta is a gripping tale of brutality, courage, and tenacity peopled with larger-than-life protagonists like Suleiman the Magnificent, Grand Master La Vallette, and Dragut the Barbary Coast pirate.

    P.S.: my 600th post and I am copying and pasting...nasty me, but well, what can you do?!?!?
    Last edited by Subedei; 06-03-2008 at 17:08.
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  16. #106
    Deadhead Member Owen Glyndwr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Did anyone mentio Froissart's Chronicles? Excellent read, Froissart was the chroniclist for England and Navarre in the mid 1300s, and he gives detailed accounts of both the battles of Crecy and Poitiers. He also talks about the political goings ons in Navarre and Spain at the time, and he talks about the overthrow of Richard II Unfortunately he died in I think 1413, so no Agincourt, but a great read for historians all the same.
    "You must know, then, that there are two methods of fight, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second. It is therefore necessary for a prince to know well how to use both the beast and the man.
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  17. #107
    Nascent Veteran Member Tiberius of the Drake's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    These are my suggestions:

    The Art of War in the Middle Ages:
    Volumes One and Two, By Sir Charles Oman

    I know this title is already on the List But this two volume set is very different from a long essay. It is two volumes of about 500 pages each.Good read and a lot of detail, takes some getting used to the level of detail that is sadly lacking in many more modern texts (the first edition 1898, the last edition 1923). it has been reprinted under Greenhill books

    Osman's Dream
    Caroline Finkel

    A good comprehensive history of the Ottoman empire from inception to post WWI Fall

    Alexander of Macedon: 356-323 B.C., A Historical Biography
    Peter Green

    Pretty basic biography of Alexander the Great, exposing a part of Alexander's character not often examined by Modern historians.

    A Short History of Byzantium
    John Julius Norwich

    As the title suggests an abridged history of Byzantium (From his three volume work). covers from Constantine the Great to the fall of Constantinople


    A History of the Roman People
    Fritz M. Heichelheim, Cedric A. Yeo, Allen M. Ward

    An Analytical history that covers the rise and fall of the roman Empire in the West from Pre-history to 476A.D. It also covers , briefly, the history of the Eastern empire through the reign of Justinian


    A History of Rome: Down to the Reign of Constantine


    Another analytical history that covers from pre-History to Constantine. It is more detailed than Heichelheim as it covers about two hundred years of history


    I apologize if any of these are repeats, I might add more later
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  18. #108
    Member Member Trve Leveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Imho obilgatory European Armour by Claude Blair. Even if some minor things might be outdated, it is still the book on medieval european armour. It in detail describes mail, transitional and plate armour, the evolution of armour throughout the time and regional differences. An interesting read for everyone who wants to know his medieval armour.

    And of course I recommend Oakeshott, who defutes many urban and victorian myths about european swords.



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  19. #109

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Quote Originally Posted by doc_bean View Post
    I just finished reading 1453 by Roger Crowly.
    It's a pretty detailed description of the siege of Byzantium and the events leading up to it (though it gets to the actual siege pretty fast). I liked it, it was well written and easy to read, it didn't slow down as much as most books on history tend to at a certain point.

    It is slightly biased towards the Ottomans, their cruelties are often and quickly compared to what was common in western Europe. I felt this was mostly done so we wouldn't demonise the ottomans to much and actually give the story more of a 'happy' ending. It certainly didn't bother me, in any case.

    I do have some questions about the historical accuracy at certain points. The author claimed the Turks got impaling from the Balkans, whilst I always assumed it was the other way around. I'm also confused about his use of 'Jihad', which he claims refers to the war of Islam against the rest of the world, supposedly ending in the total domination of Islam. I thought (the lesser) Jihad referred to a defensive war.

    But besides these little things I do recommend it, if nothing else it was a fun read
    Please don't quote me on this, but I rember on the old TV show Time Commanders Adrain Goldsworthy mentioned that inplaling was practised by the Eastern Roman Empire.

    Also heres a link to the Wiki page on it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impalement

  20. #110

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I'm taking a master degree in modern japan and really enjoy reading this thread! Try www.betterworldbooks.com, they've good prices and sometimes they send worldwide for free \o/ Also it is an ONG, so every profite goes to projects for alfabetization!

    Sorry for the ass english. I'm used to cry with my horses only... "Charge, beasts, charge!" =D
    "The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who, in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children.And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee!". Ezequiel 25:17

  21. #111
    Member Member frostsid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    I think that this book wasn't mentioned before. It's The Roman Army, edited by Chris McNab.

    It's an overview of the roman army from the very beginning to the later years of the empire. It has many illustrations, tactical maps and also covers some of the major battles.

    You can check it here

  22. #112
    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    On the topic of Medieval Books - can anyone recommend some new Osprey additions on medieval armies?
    Ja mata, TosaInu. You will forever be remembered.

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    Been to: :

    Swords Made of Letters - 1938. The war is looming - and Alexandre Reythier does not have much time left to protect his country.

  23. #113
    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Adding to this thread - Warren Treadgold's Byzantium Army 284 - 1081.
    Ja mata, TosaInu. You will forever be remembered.

    Proud

    Been to: :

    Swords Made of Letters - 1938. The war is looming - and Alexandre Reythier does not have much time left to protect his country.

  24. #114
    REX POLONIAE Moderator KLAssurbanipal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    New Osprey book about Roman heavy cavalry will be release in this month.

    "Roman Heavy Cavalry (1)
    CATAPHRACTARII & CLIBANARII, 1ST CENTURY BC–5TH CENTURY AD"


    • Author: Raffaele D’Amato, Andrey Evgenevich Negin
    • Illustrator: Andrey Evgenevich Negin
    • Publication Date: 29 Nov 2018





    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


  25. #115
    REX POLONIAE Moderator KLAssurbanipal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    New Osprey book about Roman heavy cavalry will be release in this month.

    "Roman Heavy Cavalry (1)
    CATAPHRACTARII & CLIBANARII, 1ST CENTURY BC5TH CENTURY AD"


    • Author: Raffaele DAmato, Andrey Evgenevich Negin
    • Illustrator: Andrey Evgenevich Negin
    • Publication Date: 29 Nov 2018






    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

  26. #116

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    Some new, interesting books coming out in the next time period

    Cambridge Books - Byzantine Empire -> https://www.amazon.com/Cambridge-His...s=books&sr=1-5

    Sultan Saladin -> https://www.amazon.com/Life-Legend-S...=books&sr=1-12

    Byzantine Kinship ->https://www.amazon.com/Elite-Byzanti...=books&sr=1-23

  27. #117

    Default Re: Books on Medieval Europe and Rome

    https://global.oup.com/academic/prod...cc=ro&lang=en&

    The Allure of Battle - a tome of a book, quite hefty to read, but it explores in depth the allure of battle & war and how it happened over centuries of history.

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