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Thread: Medieval noblemen

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    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Medieval noblemen

    Hey friendz....

    Who can give me some info about the following medieval noblemen:

    Raymond of Tripoli
    Grand Master Hermann von Salza
    Emperor Constantinos XI Dragases
    Emperor Alexius Comnen I
    King Edward I Longshanks
    Guy of Lusignan
    Frederic II

    Thanks in advance
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    robotica erotica Member Colovion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    which Raymond? the 2nd? or the 3rd?
    robotica erotica

  3. #3

    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Quote Originally Posted by Colovion
    which Raymond? the 2nd? or the 3rd?
    or maybe the first?
    He was one of the leaders of the first crusade. He was named Raymond de Saint-Gilles and was count of toulouse before he conquered tripoli in the early 1100's, after that he was known as the count of tripoli.

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    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Raymond of Tripoli who participated at Hattin in 1187....
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    Robber Baron Member Brutus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Quote Originally Posted by edyzmedieval
    Hey friendz....

    Who can give me some info about the following medieval noblemen:

    Raymond of Tripoli
    Grand Master Hermann von Salza
    Emperor Constantinos XI Dragases
    Emperor Alexius Comnen I
    King Edward I Longshanks
    Guy of Lusignan
    Frederic II

    Thanks in advance
    What a curious set of figures... "Noblemen" doesn't seem entirely appropriate to most of these dudes... The term in itself is already difficult enough to really 'mean' anything, but allright, info...

    Raymond of Tripoli should be the Raymond of Tripoli who was regent of Jerusalem during the very short reign of king Baldwin V of Jerusalem (ruled 1185-1186, died when still minor)? He was at loggerheads with the Templars (under their totally insane Grand Master Gerard de Ridefort), Reynald de Chattilon and Guy de Lusignan, who succeeded Baldwin V after his supporters made a coup? He was a friend of Saladin (he had been captured by the muslims years before, had learnt Arabic and appreciated Muslim culture), allowing him to let a reconnaisance party into crusader territory in 1187. A bunch of Templars and secullar knights under Gerard de Ridefort attacked them though (the knights being under 200 men strenght, the muslims about 7000), and the were wiped out at the Springs of Cresson (Ridefort was one of 3 to escape that massacre), after that Saladin besieged Tripoli which was Raymond's, and Raymond's wife was caught in this city.
    Despite this, he advised king Guy, with whom he had reconciled, not to attack Saladin. However, Guy was convinced by the (apparently suicidal) Gerard de Ridefort that they should attack anyway, resulting into the disastrous battle of Hattin in which Guy, Gerard and Reynald de Chattilon were all captured. Raymond however, escaped, only I believe, to die a year later.

    Guy de Lusignan was from a minor French noble family but he married king Balwin IV's sister Sibylla and was made king against Baldwin's wishes. After the debacle at Hattin he was released and joined the Third Crusade outside Acre. There, he got involved in a struggle between himself and Conrad of Montferrat, who had led the resistance against Saladin at Tyre, about who should be king. Conrad, however, was murdered by Assasins, but Guy's position was unmanagable, Richard the Lionheart making Hugh of Champagne king of Jersusalem instead. Richard then sold Cyprus, which he had conquered on his way to the Holy Land, to Guy who thus became king of Cyprus.

    The story of the the period 1186-1192 in the Holy Land is very interesting and very complicated, at many times even very much comical...

    Frederic II, "Stupor Mundi" ("Wonder of the World"), was the grandson of Frederic I "Barbarossa" and son of Emperor Henry VI, who had gained the kingdom of Sicily for his family. This is where Frederic II was born. The stories about him are many: how he struggled against counter-king Otto IV, who he finally defeated at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214 (Frederic fighting with Philip II August of France, Otto with John Lackland of England), how he struggled with the pope and was excommunicated, how he went on crusade while still excommunicated and gained Jerusalem by treaty instead of fighting, how he fought the German barons, how he wrote a book about falcons, etc. When he was dead, many people didn't believe it (like what happened with his grandfather), and many years after his fdeath sometimes still someone would rise and claim he was Frederic, causing a lot of disturbance in Germany which had to be violently crushed. It seems he was far ahead of his time and actualy scorned Christianity and liked the Muslim ways of his Sicilian subjects far better. Many, many books have been written about him and I really can't do him justice here.

    Also, I think I've typed enough, so I'll leave the other figures to people who probably can tell more interestingly about them

  6. #6

    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    One correction Brutus. The city that Saladin besieged was Tiberias, not Tripoli.
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    Robber Baron Member Brutus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Quote Originally Posted by 1pain1Duck
    One correction Brutus. The city that Saladin besieged was Tiberias, not Tripoli.
    Er...Yes, I meant to say that...

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    Ja mata, TosaInu Forum Administrator edyzmedieval's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Thanks for the answers...

    Also, add:

    Frederic I Barbarossa
    Reynaud de Chatillon


    I'll add more.... I'm damn curious about these guys....
    Ja mata, TosaInu. You will forever be remembered.

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    robotica erotica Member Colovion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    robotica erotica

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    Robber Baron Member Brutus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Medieval noblemen

    Quote Originally Posted by edyzmedieval
    Thanks for the answers...

    Also, add:

    Frederic I Barbarossa
    Reynaud de Chatillon


    I'll add more.... I'm damn curious about these guys....
    Ah, Reynald de Chatillon, my favourite villain of history...
    He was of a minor French noble family, arriving in the Holy land along with the Second Crusade (1147-'48), he married Constance of Antioch in 1153 and became prince of Antioch. A few years later, he attacked Cyprus, devastating the island. He was forced to submit to the Byzantine emperr, but never suffered much from that: instead, in 1160 he decided to rob poor Syrian peasants of their cattle, but he was captured on his way back by sultan Nur-ed-din and imprisoned. In prison, he got to utterly despise the Muslims (in contrast to Raymond of Tripoli's reaction on being imprisoned) and he wasn't released until 1176.

    Having lost the principality of Antioch, he married the heiress of the lordship of Oultrejourdain (Transjordan) and thus became lord of this border region in the south. In 1177 he defeated Saladin (who had cunningly slipped past the kingdoms' defences at Gaza and Ascalon) at the Battle of Montisgard. This resulted in a treaty with the Saladin until 1182, when Reynald build a pirate fleet which sailed up the Red Sea, threathening Mecca and other Muslim Holy Places. His ships were however destroyed, as was a group of his men on their way to Mecca to dig up the body of the prophet Muhammed. Saladin retailiated by attacking Kerak, which was relieved by Raymond of Tripoli.

    Reynald stayed calm until 1186, when he attacked a unsuspecting group of Pilgrims on their way to Mecca. This group also contained Saladin's sister. Saladin, outraged, invaded crusader territory whilst the whole business with Guy de Lusignan becoming king (Reynald was his main supporter along with Templar Gerard de Ridefort). Reynald was captured after the battle of Hattin, when Saladin, acoording to legend, offered Guy de Lusignan a cup of water, meaning Guy wouldn't be harmed by Saladin. Guy then passed the cup to Reynald, but Saladin commented: "I did not offer water to this man", and he beheaded Reynald after offering him the choice between conversion (which Reynald refused) or death (it is not entirely clear if he beheaded him himself, but he had vowed he would kill Reynald for what he'd done).

    Frederic I Barbarossa (Redbeard), went with the Second Crusade with his uncle, king Conrad III, when he himself was still duke of Swabia. He became king in 1152 and was crowned king of Lombardy and Emperor in 1155. He went to Italy 6 times during his lifetime to try to subject the Nord-Italian cities (who later formed the Lombard league), in which he ultimately failed. His biggest succes was his victory over Milan, which he had rased to the ground (1158), and his biggest defeat was at the battle of Legnano (1176), when he even was unhorsed. Further, he struggled against several popes (most notoriously against Alexander III), having his own anti-popes, and his German vassals, like his cousins Henry "Jasomirgott" (duke of Austria, died 1177) and Henry the Lion (duke of Saxony and Bavaria until he was banned to England). In 1189, he assembled a crusading army at Regensburg and marched overland to Gallipoli, where he crossed into Asia Minor. In the Cilician river the Kalykadnos he fancied a swim (he was an excellent swimmer), but due to some unknown cause (probably a stroke) he drowned in the river. After that, some of the Germans continued on Crusade under Barbarossa's son Frederic of Swabia (who died outside Acre), but most went back home.
    He is said not to have died at all but just to be sleeping under the Kyffhauser mountains in Middle Germany, where he will awake in time of Germany's greatest need to lead the country to greatness once more. (this legend caused Hitler to call his invasion of Russia "Operation Barbarossa").
    For an amusing account of him and his lifetime, read Umberto Eco's 'Baudolino'.
    Last edited by Brutus; 06-23-2005 at 10:44.

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