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Thread: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

  1. #1

    Default EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    The EB team is proud to present the Battle of Magnesia for Europa Barbaroum 0.7.4. This battle takes place between two Seleucid Armies and a Roman Army, and has been lovingly recreated by tk-421 using the units avaliable in Europa Barbarorum 0.7.4. Acting as historical advisors, Angadil and Cunctator have added much to the historical accuracy and enjoyment of this historic battle. Thanks also must go to Foot and Krusader for providing technical support with the installer and ftp.

    Download

    Note: In order to play Magnesia for 0.74, you must copy the entire contents of the data\world\maps\campaign\imperial campaign folder into the data\world\maps\base folder. This download is probably not compatible with the edyz map mod.

    All of us at EB hope you enjoy this as much as we do and remember to look out for more great battles from history in future Europa Barbarorum releases.

    Thanks,

    The EB Team
    Last edited by tk-421; 08-26-2006 at 20:11.

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    "His only addiction was to practice." - John Coltrane, describing Eric Dolphy

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  2. #2

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    In 195 BC King Nabis of Sparta conquered the city of Argos. The Achaean League, the most powerful state in the Peloponnesus at that time and longtime enemy of Nabis, appealed to Rome to intervene. Roman proconsul Titus Qunctius Flamininus ordered Nabis to abandon Argos. The Spartan tyrant, of course, refused. Flamininus then led a successful campaign in Laconia in which he forced Nabis to give up both Argos and the Spartan port at Gythium.

    This and other Roman interventions in Greek affairs made many Greeks wary. Especially upset were the Aetolians, former allies of Rome during the Macedonian Wars. As the Roman legions left Greece, the Aetolians went to Antiochus the Great, ruler of the Seleucid Empire, and convinced him that the Greeks were tired of Roman meddling and that he should send an army to Greece. Antiochus had been at odds with the Romans since they demanded that he leave the coastal cities of Asia Minor alone. In 192 BC, he invaded with a small force of 10,000 men.

    Antiochus found that the Aetolian claims of Greek willingness to follow him were greatly exaggerated. Worse still, Rome sent two legions under the command of Consul Manius Acilius Glabrio to Greece. Antiochus saw that he was hopelessly outnumbered and moved his army to Thermopylae, the same site where the Spartans made their defiant stand against a vast Persian army almost 300 year before, in an effort to counter Rome’s numerical advantage with favorable terrain. The Roman legions and Greek allies under Glabrio followed the Antiochus to Thermopylae and crushed the Seleucid army. Antiochus fled back to Asia Minor and raised a new army.

    Lucius Scipio, brother of the legendary Scipio Africanus, was elected Consul in 190 BC and sent to continue the war with Antiochus. He took Africanus with him as a legate. The Scipio brothers and their army met Antiochus in western Asia Minor near the town of Magnesia. Antiochus offered peace terms but the Romans would not accept them. At first Antiochus refused to fight, but the Romans moved their camp closer and closer to the Seleucid army until Antiochus was forced to fight.

    The Roman army that fought at Magnesia was 30,000 strong. Two Roman legions made up the center of the line with an allied Italian ala on either side.The left flank of the Roman army was protected by the Phrygios River. 3,000 Achaean peltasts and Pergamene light troops were positioned on the right flank. Further to the right was a force of 3,000 cavalry, including 800 Pergamene cavalry under the command of the Roman ally Eumenes. The Roman army also included 16 African elephants. These were left behind at the camp because it was thought that they could not stand against Antiochus’ larger and more numerous Indian elephants.

    Antiochus’ army consisted of 70,000 infantry, cavalry, light troops, elephants, and chariots. The phalanx of 16,000 men was the core of his army. It was divided into ten sections, each 32 men deep, with elephants and skirmishers standing in between each section. Additional infantry and a large cavalry force were positioned on either side of the phalanx. Scythed chariots were positioned in front of the cavalry on the left.

    The battle began when Eumenes, stationed on the Roman right, led a force of missile troops and a few squadrons of cavalry in loose order against the chariots. The chariot horses were panicked by the missiles and ran in every which direction causing panic on the Seleucid left. The Roman cavalry took this opportunity to charge and the Seleucid soldiers on the left were all routed or killed.

    Meanwhile, the Roman legions advanced on Antiochus’ phalanx, threw their pila, and engaged in close combat. Antiochus, positioned with the cataphracts and agema on the Seleucid right, saw that the opposing Roman flank was poorly defended and led a charge. The Seleucid heavy cavalry rout the small cavalry force on the Roman left and drove some infantry back to the camp. The camp was commanded by a military tribune named Aemilius. Aemilius rallied the fleeing Romans and ordered the camp guard to stand their ground. When Antiochus realized that the men he was chasing had turned and were fighting, he panicked and he fled the field with his cavalry. With both flanks defeated, the Seleucid infantry routed. The Romans, led by Eumenes’ cavalry, pursued the fleeing army and slaughtered them.

    50,000 infantry and 3,000 cavalry of Antiochus were killed at Magnesia. 1,500 were taken prisoner, including 15 elephants and their drivers. Antiochus was forced to hand abandon all territory in Asia Minor west of the Taurus Mountains and pay war reparations to Rome and Pergamon.


    Here are two actual ancient accounts of the battle as written by Livy and Appian:

    Appian's Description
    [30] After this conference Publius was taken sick and withdrew to Elæa, leaving Gnæus Domitius as his brother's counsellor. Antiochus thinking, as Philip of Macedon did, that nothing worse than these terms could befall him if he were vanquished in war, drew his forces together near the plain of Thyatira not far from the enemy, and sent Scipio's son to him at Elæa. Scipio advised those who brought his son that Antiochus should not fight until he himself should return to the army. Antiochus, acting on this advice, transferred his camp to Mount Sipylus and fortified it with a strong wall. He also interposed the river Phrygius between himself and the enemy, so that he should not be compelled to fight against his will. Domitius, however, in a spirit of ambition, wanted to decide the war himself. So he boldly crossed the river and established a camp at a distance of twenty stades from Antiochus. Four days in succession they both drew up their forces in front of their own fortifications, but neither of them began a battle. On the fifth day Domitius did the same again and haughtily advanced. As Antiochus did not meet him he moved his camp nearer. After an interval of one day he announced by herald in the hearing of the enemy that he would fight Antiochus on the following day whether he was willing or not. The latter was perplexed and again changed his mind. Although he would have ventured heretofore only to make a stand under the wall or to repel the enemy from the wall, till Scipio should regain his health, he now thought that with superior numbers it would be disgraceful to decline an engagement. So he prepared for battle.

    [31] Both marched out about the last watch, just before daylight. The ordering of the troops on either side was as follows. The Roman legionaries, to the number of 10,000, formed the left wing resting on the river. Behind these were 10,000 Italian allies, and both these divisions were in files in triple line of battle. Behind the Italians came the army of Eumenes and about 3000 Achæan peltasts. Thus stood the left, while on the right wing were the Roman and Italian cavalry and those of Eumenes, not more than 3000 in all. Mingled with all these were light-armed troops and bowmen, and around Domitius himself were four troops of horse. Altogether they were about 30,000 strong. Domitius took his station on the right wing and placed the consul in the centre. He gave the command of the left wing to Eumenes. Considering his African elephants of no use, being few in number and of small size, as those of Africa usually are (and the small ones are afraid of the larger), he placed them in the rear of all. Such was the Roman line of battle.

    [32] The total force of Antiochus was 70,000 and the strongest of these was the Macedonian phalanx of 16,000 men, still arrayed after the fashion of Alexander and Philip. These were placed in the centre, divided into ten sections of 1600, men each, with fifty men in the front line of each section and thirty-two deep. On the flanks of each section were twenty-two elephants.2 The appearance of the phalanx was like that of a wall, of which the elephants were the towers. Such was the arrangement of the infantry of Antiochus. His horse were stationed on either wing, consisting of the mail-clad Galatians and the Macedonian corps called the Agema, so named because they were picked horsemen. An equal number of these were stationed on either side of the phalanx. Besides these the right wing had certain light-armed troops, and other horsemen with silver shields, and 200 mounted archers. On the left were the Galatian bands of the Tectosagi, the Trocmi, the Tolistoboii, and certain Cappadocians furnished by King Ariarthes, and a mingling of other tribes. There was another body of horse, mail-clad but light-armed, called the Companion cavalry. In this way Antiochus drew up his forces. He seems to have placed most reliance on his cavalry, whom he stationed in large numbers on his front. The serried phalanx, in which he should have placed most confidence, on account of its high state of discipline, was crowded together unskilfully in a narrow space. Besides the forces enumerated there was a great multitude of slingers, archers, javelin throwers, and peltasts from Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia, Pisidia, Crete, Tralles, and Cilicia, armed after the Cretan fashion. There were also other mounted archers from the Dahæ, Mysia, Elymaïs, and Arabia, riding on swift camels, who shot arrows with dexterity from their high position, and used very long thin knives when they came to close combat. Antiochus also placed scythe-bearing chariots in the space between the armies to begin the battle, with orders to retire after the first onset.

    [33] The appearance of his formation was like that of two armies, one to begin the fight, the other held in reserve. Each was arranged in a way to strike terror into the enemy both by numbers and equipment. Antiochus commanded the horse on the right wing in person; his son Seleucus commanded the left. Philip, the master of the elephants, commanded the phalanx, and Mendis and Zeuxis the skirmishers. The day was dark and gloomy so that the sight of the display was obscured and the aim of the missiles of all kinds impaired by the misty and murky atmosphere. When Eumenes perceived this he disregarded the remainder of the enemy's force, and fearing only the onset of the scythe-bearing chariots, which were mostly ranged against him, he ordered the slingers, archers, and other light-armed under his command to circle around the chariots and aim at the horses, instead of the drivers, for when a horse becomes unmanageable in a chariot all the chariot becomes useless. He often breaks the ranks of his own friends, who are afraid of the scythes. So it turned out. The horses being wounded in great numbers charged with their chariots upon their own ranks. The camels were thrown into disorder first, as they were next in line to the chariots, and after them the mail-clad horse who could not easily dodge the scythes on account of the weight of their armor. Great was the tumult and various the disorder started chiefly by these runaways and spreading along the whole front, the apprehension being even worse than the fact. For, as by reason of distance and multitude, discordant cries and manifold fears, the truth was not clearly grasped even by those near the danger, so these transmitted the alarm constantly magnified to those beyond.

    [34] Eumenes, having succeeded admirably in his first attempt and cleared the ground held by the camels and chariots, led his own horse and those of the Romans and Italians in his division against the Galatians, the Cappadocians, and the other collection of mercenaries opposed to him, cheering loudly and exhorting them to have no fear of these inexperienced men who had been deprived of their advance supports. They obeyed him and made so heavy a charge that they put to flight not only those, but the adjoining squadrons and the mail-clad horse, who were already thrown into disorder by the chariots. The greater part of these, unable to turn and fly quickly, on account of the weight of their armor, were captured or killed. While this was the state of affairs on the left of the Macedonian phalanx, Antiochus, on the right, broke through the Roman line of battle, dismembered it, and pursued a long distance.

    [35] The Macedonian phalanx, which had been stationed between the two bodies of horse in a narrow space in the form of a square, when denuded of cavalry on either side, had opened to receive the light-armed troops, who had been skirmishing in front, and closed again. Thus crowded together, Domitius easily enclosed them with his numerous light cavalry. Having no opportunity to charge or even to deploy their dense mass, they began to suffer severely; and they were indignant that military experience availed them nothing, exposed as they were on all sides to the weapons of the enemy. Nevertheless, they presented their thick-set pikes on all four sides. They challenged the Romans to close combat and preserved at all times the appearance of being about to charge. Yet they did not advance, because they were foot-soldiers and heavily armed, and saw that the enemy were mounted. Most of all they feared to relax their close formation lest they might not readily bring it together again. The Romans did not come to close quarters nor approach them because they feared the discipline, the solidity, and the desperation of this veteran corps ; but circled around them and assailed them with javelins and arrows, none of which missed their mark in the dense mass, who could neither turn the missiles aside nor dodge them. After suffering severely in this way they yielded to necessity and fell back step by step, but with a bold front, in perfect order and still formidable to the Romans. The latter kept their distance and continued to circle around and wound them, until the elephants inside the Macedonian phalanx became excited and unmanageable. Then the phalanx broke into disorderly flight.

    [36] After he had gained this success, Domitius hastened to the camp of Antiochus and overpowered the forces guarding it. In the meantime Antiochus, after pursuing for a long distance that part of the Roman legionaries opposed to him, came to the Roman camp, where he found no guard, either of cavalry or light-armed troops (for Domitius, thinking that the river afforded sufficient protection, had not provided any). But a military tribune, the prefect of the camp, hastened to meet him with a body of fresh troops and checked his advance, and the fugitives took new courage from their comrades and rallied. The king returned haughty as one who had gained a victory, knowing nothing of what had taken place elsewhere. When Attalus, the brother of Eumenes, with a large body of horse, threw himself in his way, Antiochus easily cut through them, but he disregarded the enemy, who took to flight before they had received much damage. When he discovered his defeat and saw the field of battle strewn with the bodies of his own men, horses, and elephants, and his camp already captured, he fled precipitately, arriving at Sardis about mid-night. From Sardis he went to the town Ceænæn, which they call Apamea, whither he had been informed that his son had fled. On the following day he retreated to Syria, leaving officers in Celænæ to collect the remains of his army. He also sent ambassadors to the consul to treat for peace. The latter was engaged in burying his own dead, stripping those of the enemy, and collecting prisoners. Of the Roman dead there were found twenty-four knights and 300 foot-soldiers from the city, being mostly those whom Antiochus had slain. Eumenes lost only fifteen of his horse. It is believed that the loss of Antiochus, including prisoners, was 50,000. It was not easy to number them on account of their multitude. Some of his elephants were killed and fifteen were captured.
    Livy's Description
    [37.39]When the consul saw that he declined to give battle, he summoned a council of war for the next day to decide what he was to do if Antiochus did not give them the opportunity of fighting. Winter, he said, was coming on; either he would have to keep the soldiers in their tents or else, if he wished to go into winter quarters, operations would have to be suspended till the summer. For none of their enemies did the Romans ever feel greater contempt. From all sides they called upon him to lead them out to battle and to take full advantage of the ardour of the soldiers. If the enemy would not come out, they were ready to charge over the fosses and rampart and rush the camp, for it was not as though they had to fight with so many thousands of men, but rather to slaughter so many thousands of cattle. Cn. Domitius was sent to reconnoitre the ground and find out at what point the enemy's rampart could be best approached, and after he had brought definite and complete information it was decided to move the camp on the morrow nearer the enemy. On the third day the standards were advanced into the middle of the plain and the line formed. Antiochus, on his side, felt that he ought not to hesitate any longer lest he should depress the spirits of his own men and raise the hopes of the enemy by declining battle. He led his forces out just far enough from his camp to make it appear that he intended to fight.

    The Roman army was practically uniform as regards both the men and their equipment; there were two Roman legions and two of Latins and allies, each containing 5000 men. The Romans occupied the centre, the Latins the wings. The standards of the hastati were in front, then came those of the principes, and last of all the triarii. Beyond these, whom we may call the regulars, the consul drew up on his right, level with them, the auxiliary troops of Eumenes who were incorporated with the Achaean caetrati, amounting to about 3000 men; beyond them again were stationed nearly 3000 cavalry, 800 of which were furnished by Eumenes, the rest being Romans. Outside these were posted the Trallian and Cretan horse, each body numbering 500 troopers. The left wing was not considered to need so much support as it rested on the river and was protected by the precipitous banks; four squadrons of cavalry, however, were lined up at that end. This was the total strength which the Romans brought into the field. In addition to these, however, there was a mixed force of Macedonians and Thracians, 2000 in all, who had followed as volunteers; they were left to guard the camp. The sixteen elephants were placed in reserve behind the triarii; they could not possibly stand against the king's elephants, of which there were fifty-four, and the African elephants are no match for the Indian elephants even when the numbers are equal, for the latter are much larger and fight with more determination.

    [37.40]The king's army was a motley force drawn from many nations and presented the greatest dissimilarity both in the men and their equipment. There were 16,000 infantry in the Macedonian fashion. known as the "phalanx." These formed the centre, and their front consisted of ten divisions; between each division stood two elephants. They were thirty-two ranks deep. This was the main strength of the king's army and it presented a most formidable appearance, especially with the elephants towering high above the men. The effect was heightened by the frontlets and crests on the animals, and the towers on their backs on which stood the drivers, each accompanied by four soldiers. On the right of the phalanx Antiochus stationed 1500 Gallograeci infantry, and with them were linked up 3000 cavalry, clad in mail armour and known as "cataphracti." These were supported by the "agema," another body of cavalry numbering about 1000; they were a select force, consisting of Medes and men drawn from many tribes in that part of the world. Behind these in support were sixteen elephants. The line was continued by the royal cohort called "argyraspides" from the kind of shield they carried. Then came the Dahae, mounted archers, 1200 strong; then 3ooo light infantry, half of them Cretans and half Tralles. Beyond these again were 2500 Mysian bowmen, and at the end of the line a mixed force of Cyrtian slingers and Elymaean archers.

    On the left of the phalanx were 1500 Gallograeci infantry and 2000 Cappadocian, similarly armed and sent by Ariarathes, next to whom were posted a miscellaneous force numbering 2700. Then came 3000 cataphracti and the king's personal cavalry, 1000 strong, with somewhat slighter protection for themselves and their horses, but otherwise closely resembling the cataphracti, made up mostly of Syrians with an admixture of Phrygians and Lydians. In front of this mass of cavalry were scythe chariots and the camels which they call dromedaries. Seated on these were Arabian archers provided with narrow swords four cubits long so that they could reach the enemy from the height on which they were perched. Beyond them again a mass of troops corresponding to those on the right wing, first Tarentines, then 2500 Gallograeci cavalry, 1000 newly enlisted Cretans, 1500 Carians and Cilicians similarly armed, and the same number of Tralles. Then came 4000 caetrati, Pisidians, Pamphylians and Lydians, next to these Cyrtian and Elymaean troops equal in number to those on the right wing, and finally sixteen elephants a short distance away.

    [37.41]The king commanded the right in person, the left he placed in charge of his son Seleucus and his nephew Antipater. The centre was entrusted to three commanders, Minnio, Zeuxis and Philip; the latter was the master of the elephants. The morning haze, which as the day advanced lifted into clouds, obscured the atmosphere, and then a drizzling rain coming with the south wind wetted everything. This did not inconvenience the Romans much, but it was a serious disadvantage to the king's troops. As the Roman line was of only moderate length, the indistinctness of the light did not obstruct the view over the whole of it, and as it consisted almost entirely of heavy-armed troops, the fine rain had no effect on their weapons which were swords and javelins. The king's line, on the other hand, was of such an enormous length that it was impossible to see the wings from the centre, let alone the fact that the extremes of the line were out of sight of each other, and the wetting mist relaxed their bows and slings and the thongs of their missile spears. Antiochus trusted to his scythe chariots to throw the enemy ranks into utter confusion, but they only turned the danger against their own side. These chariots were armed in the following manner: On either side of the pole where the yoke-bar was fastened spikes were fixed which projected forward like horns, ten cubits long, so as to pierce anything that came in their way, and at each end of the yoke-bar two scythes projected, one on a level with the bar so as to cut off sideways anything it came against, the other turned towards the ground to catch those lying down or trying to get under it. Similarly two scythes pointing in opposite directions to each end of the axis of the wheels.

    The chariots thus armed were stationed, as I have already said, in front of the line for had they been in the rear or the centre they must have been driven through their own men. When he saw this, Eumenes, who was quite familiar with their mode of fighting, and knew how much their assistance would be worth when once the horses were terrified, ordered the Cretan archers, the slingers and javelin men, in conjunction with some troops of cavalry, to run forward, not in close order but as loosely as possible, and discharge their missiles simultaneously from every side. What with the wounds inflicted by the missiles and the wild shouts of the assailants, this tempestuous onslaught so scared the horses that they started to gallop wildly about the field as though without bit or bridle. The light infantry and slingers and the active Cretans easily avoided them when they dashed towards them, and the cavalry increased the confusion and panic by affrighting the horses and even the camels, and to this was added the shouts of those who had not gone into action. The chariots were driven off the field, and now that this silly show was got rid of the signal was given, and both sides closed in a regular battle.

    [37.42]These useless shams, however, were soon to prove the cause of a real disaster. The auxiliary troops who were posted in reserve next to them were so demoralised by the panic and confusion of the chariots that they took to flight and exposed the whole line as far as the cataphracti. Now that the reserves were broken the Roman horse made a charge against these, and many of them did not await even the first shock, some were routed, others owing to the weight of their mail armour were caught and killed. Then the remainder of the left wing entirely gave way, and when the auxiliaries who were stationed between the cavalry and the phalanx were thrown into disorder the demoralisation reached the centre. Here the ranks were broken and they were prevented from using their extraordinarily long spears-the Macedonians call them "sarisae" - by their own comrades who ran back for shelter amongst them. Whilst they were in this disorder the Romans advanced against them and discharged their javelins. Even the elephants posted between the divisions of the phalanx did not deter them, accustomed as they were in the African wars to evade the charge of the beast and attack its sides with their javelins or, if they could get nearer to it, hamstring it with their swords. The centre front was now almost entirely beaten down and the reserves, having been outflanked, were being cut down from the rear. At this juncture the Romans heard in another part of the field the cries of their own men in flight, almost at the very gates of their camp. Antiochus from his position on his right wing had noticed that the Romans, trusting to the protection of the river, had only four squadrons of cavalry in position there, and these, keeping in touch with their infantry. had left the bank of the river exposed. He attacked this part of the line with his auxiliaries and cataphracti, and not only forced back their front, but wheeling round along the river, pressed on their flank until the cavalry were put to flight and the infantry, who were next to them, were driven with them in headlong flight to their camp.

    [37.43]The camp was in charge of a military tribune, M. Aemilius, son of the M. Lepidus who a few years later was made Pontifex Maximus. When he saw the fugitives coming towards the camp he met them with the whole of the camp guard and ordered them to stop, then, reproving them sharply for their cowardly and disgraceful flight, he insisted on their returning to the battle and warned them that if they did not obey him they would rush blindly on to their ruin. Finally he gave his own men the order to cut down those who first came up and drive the crowd which followed them back against the enemy with their swords. The greater fear overcame the less. The danger which threatened them on either hand brought them to a halt, then they went back to the fighting. Aemilius with his camp guard - there were 2000 of them, brave soldiers - offered a firm resistance to the king who was in eager pursuit, and Attalus, who was on the Roman right where the enemy had been put to flight at the first onset, seeing the plight of his men and the tumult round the camp, came up at the moment with 200 cavalry. When Antiochus found that the men whose backs he had seen just before were now resuming the struggle, and that another mass of soldiery was collecting from the camp and from the field, he turned his horse's head and fled. Thus the Romans were victorious on both wings. Making their way through the heaps of dead which were lying most thickly in the centre, where the courage of the enemy's finest troops and the weight of their armour alike prevented flight, they went on to plunder the camp. The cavalry of Eumenes led the way, followed by the rest of the mounted troops, in pursuing the enemy over the whole plain and killing the hindmost as they came up to them. Still more havoc was wrought among the fugitives by the chariots and elephants and camels which were mixed up with them; they were not only trampled to death by the animals, but having lost all formation they stumbled like blind men over one another. There was a frightful carnage in the camp, almost more than in the battle. The first fugitives fled mostly in this direction and the camp guard, trusting to their support, fought all the more determinedly in front of their lines. The Romans, who expected to take the gates and the rampart, were held up here for some time, and when at last they did break through the defence they inflicted in their rage all the heavier slaughter.

    [37.44]It is stated that 50,000 infantry were killed on that day and 3000 of the cavalry; 1500 were made prisoners and 15 elephants captured with their drivers. Many of the Romans were wounded, but there actually fell not more than 300 infantry, 24 cavalry and 25 of the army of Eumenes. After plundering the enemy's camp the Romans returned to their own with a large amount of booty; the next day they despoiled the bodies of those killed and collected the prisoners. Delegates came from Thyatira and Magnesia ad Sipylum to make the surrender of their cities. Antiochus, accompanied in his flight from the field by a small number of his men, and joined by more on the road, arrived at Sardis about midnight with a fairly numerous body of troops. On learning that his son Seleucus with some of his friends had gone as far as Apamea, he too, with his wife and daughter, started for the same city, after handing over the defence of Sardis to Xenon and appointing Timon governor of Lydia. The townsmen and the soldiers in the citadel ignored their authority and mutually agreed to send delegates to the consul.

    The Seleucid and Roman Order of Battle in game:
    1st Seleukid Army
    1. Daha Baexdzhyntae (50)
    2. Pezhetairoi (placeholder for Argyraspidai) (135)
    3. Pezhetairoi (placeholder for Argyraspidai) (135)
    4. Pezhetairoi (placeholder for Argyraspidai) (130)
    5. General's Bodyguard (40) - Antiochos III Megas
    6. Hellenikoi Kataphractoi (60)
    7. Hellenikoi Kataphractoi (60)
    8. Galatian Kuarothoroi (60)
    9. Pezhetairoi (125)
    10. Pezhetairoi (125)
    11. Pezhetairoi (125)
    12. Pezhetairoi (125)
    13. Pezhetairoi (140)
    14. Elephants (4)
    15. Thanvare Payahdag (125)
    16. Sphendonetai (125)

    2nd Seleukid Army
    1. Galatian Kuarothoroi (60)
    2. Pantodapoi (95)
    3. Pantodapoi (95)
    4. Hellenikoi Kataphractoi (60)
    5. Hellenikoi Kataphractoi (60)
    6. General's Bodyguard (40) - Seleukos
    7. Brihentin (Placeholder for Galatian cavalry) (50)
    8. Brihentin (Placeholder for Galatian cavalry) (50)
    9. Hippakonistai (Placeholder for Tarentine Cavalry) (20)
    10. Scythed Chariots
    11. Thanvare Payahdag (placeholder for Elymaean archers) (125)
    12. Akontistai (placeholder for Eastern Javelinmen) (125)
    13. Sphendonetai (placeholder for Eastern Slingers) (125)

    Roman Army
    1. Equites (5)
    2. Allied Italian Infantry (Hastati) (80) - Left Alae
    3. Allied Italian Infantry (Principes) (80) - Left Alae
    4. Allied Italian Infantry (Samnite Spearmen) (40) - Left Alae
    5. Hastati (80) - 1st Roman Legion
    6. Principes (80) - 1st Roman Legion
    7. Triarii (40) - 1st Roman Legion
    8. Hastati (80) - 2nd Roman Legion
    9. Principes (80) - 2nd Roman Legion
    10. Triarii (40) - 2nd Roman Legion
    11. Velites (100)
    12. Allied Italian Infantry (Hastati) (80) - Right Alae
    13. Allied Italian Infantry (Principes) (80) - Right Alae
    14. Allied Italian Infantry (Samnite Spearmen) (40) - Right Alae
    15. Peltastai (120)
    16. Hippeis (30)
    17. Equites (50)
    18 Equites (50)
    19. Toxotai (Placeholder for Cretan Archers) (50)
    20. Equites Consulares (5) - Scipio


    Some in game screenshots:













    Last edited by tk-421; 08-27-2006 at 02:43.

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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Looks great! I'll probably download it later!
    Rest in Peace TosaInu, the Org will be your legacy
    Quote Originally Posted by Leon Blum - For All Mankind
    Nothing established by violence and maintained by force, nothing that degrades humanity and is based on contempt for human personality, can endure.

  4. #4

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    cool! also why not a Zama (or that battle with Scipio against Hasdrubal and Caesar's famous battles in Gaul) i can go on...

  5. #5

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    "9. Hippakonistai (Placeholder for Tarentine Cavalry) (20)"
    I was hoping that EB was planning to add Tarentine Cavalry. Yet something else to look forward to.
    EDIT: Hmm, maybe I'm being too hasty in jumping to such a conclusion?
    Last edited by Sdragon; 08-25-2006 at 23:39.

  6. #6
    EB Pointless Extras Botherer Member VandalCarthage's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Placeholder does imply that it will eventually be included, and indeed it shall be.
    "It is an error to divide people into the living and the dead: there are people who are dead-alive, and people who are alive_alive. The dead-alive also write, walk, speak, atc. But they make no mistakes; only machines make no mistakes, and they produce only dead things. The alive-alive are constantly in error, in search, in questions, in torment." - Yevgeny Zamyatin

  7. #7
    "Audacity, always audacity!" Member Simmons's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Are you sure this is meant to be in Europa Barbarorum\data\world\maps\custom this is the custom battles directory once installed I can only play custom battles on Magnesia-Normal or Magnesia-Large I still need to select factions and armies and so on

    Wouldnt Europa Barbarorum\data\world\maps\battle\custom make more sense although when i put the files here the game CTDs but then my copy of EB is RTW Gold with the 1.2 patch installed over that could be whats causing my CTD problem.

    “By push of bayonets, no firing till you see the whites of their eyes”
    - Friedrich der Große

  8. #8

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    ok i downloaded it and installed it, but:
    Where do I go to play it?????

    I don't see in Historical Battles...plz

  9. #9
    EBII Mod Leader Member Foot's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Quote Originally Posted by NeoSpartan
    ok i downloaded it and installed it, but:
    Where do I go to play it?????

    I don't see in Historical Battles...plz
    Are you using a 1.5 version of RTW (like RTW Gold) downgraded to 1.2. There may be a problem with new directory structures. When tk-421 gets in he'll get onto the problem.

    Foot
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  10. #10

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Quote Originally Posted by Andronikos Kypriakos
    Are you sure this is meant to be in Europa Barbarorum\data\world\maps\custom this is the custom battles directory once installed I can only play custom battles on Magnesia-Normal or Magnesia-Large I still need to select factions and armies and so on

    Wouldnt Europa Barbarorum\data\world\maps\battle\custom make more sense although when i put the files here the game CTDs but then my copy of EB is RTW Gold with the 1.2 patch installed over that could be whats causing my CTD problem.
    Yes, it should be in Europa Barbarorum\data\world\maps\battle\custom. As to why it CTD's, I am not sure. Try copying the entire contents of the data\world\maps\campaign\imperial campaign folder into the data\world\maps\base folder. Also, have you made any map changes or downloaded the edyz map mod?

    Quote Originally Posted by NeoSpartan
    ok i downloaded it and installed it, but:
    Where do I go to play it?????

    I don't see in Historical Battles...plz
    See above.
    Last edited by tk-421; 08-26-2006 at 13:09.

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  11. #11
    "Audacity, always audacity!" Member Simmons's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Quote Originally Posted by tk-421
    Also, have you made any map changes or downloaded the edyz map mod?
    No no map mods i'll try moving those files as you suggested and see what happens.

    Edit: Thats seems to have done the trick thanks.
    Last edited by Simmons; 08-26-2006 at 14:25. Reason: Answering Question

    “By push of bayonets, no firing till you see the whites of their eyes”
    - Friedrich der Große

  12. #12
    "Technocrat Politician" Member C.LVCIANVS's Avatar
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    Default Re: THANKS ALL!!!


    If the trick goes...
    But in next 0.8 EB version wouldn't be problems for people who put rome 1.2 over rome 1.5 like me? I say historical battles or other files etc. ...
    °CAIVS^LVCIANVS°

    ..."Atqve nostris militibvs cvnctantibvs, maxime propter altitvdinem maris, qvi decimae legionis aqvilam ferebat, obtestatvs deos, vt ea res legioni feliciter eveniret: -"Desilite"- inqvit -"commilitones, nisi vvltis aqvilam hostibvs prodere: ego certe mevm rei pvblicae atqve imperatori officivm praestitero"-. Hoc cvm voce magna dixisset, se ex navi proiecit atqve in hostes aqvilam ferre coepit. Tvm nostri cohortati inter se ne tantvm dedecvs admitteretvr vniversi ex navi desilvervnt. Hos item ex proximis [primis] navibvs cvm conspexissent, svbsecvti hostibvs adpropinqvarvnt."

    C.IVL.CAESAR COS.
    "COMMENTARII DE BELLO GALLICO" -Liber IV, XXV.

  13. #13

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    this installer is flawed
    you need to extract to some other place and move the battle directories into the battles\custom dir, but even after doing that, all i get is a CTD

  14. #14
    Elephant Master Member Conqueror's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    I get a crash too and I'm simply using a normal RTW1.2+EB installation.

    RTW, 167 BC: Rome expels Greek philosophers after the Lex Fannia law is passed. This bans the effete and nasty Greek practice of 'philosophy' in favour of more manly, properly Roman pursuits that don't involve quite so much thinking.

  15. #15

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Like I said, try copying the entire contents of the data\world\maps\campaign\imperial campaign folder into the data\world\maps\base folder. If that doesn't work, then there is some sort of mistake that I am not aware of. The battle works fine for me, Gertgregoor was able to play it, and I think Spendios did too. If copying those files doesn't work, I'll provide a zipped version to see if maybe it is a problem with the installer.

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    "His only addiction was to practice." - John Coltrane, describing Eric Dolphy

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  16. #16
    Speaker of Truth Senior Member Moros's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    yup no problems tough I probably had moved the files to the base directory already. (As I've experimented with the battle editor.)

  17. #17

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    that works

  18. #18

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Great! I'll put something about that next to the link.

    Visit the EB Help Required Thread

    "His only addiction was to practice." - John Coltrane, describing Eric Dolphy

    "and thus it cannot be performed, because one cannot perform that which does not exist." - Arnold Schönberg

  19. #19

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    also, both Appian's and Livy's notes on the battle seem identical

  20. #20

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    So, has anyone tried it out?

    Visit the EB Help Required Thread

    "His only addiction was to practice." - John Coltrane, describing Eric Dolphy

    "and thus it cannot be performed, because one cannot perform that which does not exist." - Arnold Schönberg

  21. #21
    "Audacity, always audacity!" Member Simmons's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Quote Originally Posted by tk-421
    So, has anyone tried it out?
    Yes and I enjoyed it a lot I don't get to fight the Romans that often so it was a nice change I must say I didnt really like the 2nd Seleukid army being controlled by the AI complete idiot just ran straight through my Phalangites and head on charged the whole Roman army needless to say he was slaughtered moron.

    I found the army's somewhat close together at the start as well the battle was quite frantic right from the start with no real skirmishing or maneuvering which led to little real tactics being used (apart from massed Kataphraktoi charges) But I think that was mainly the Roman army chasing the routing units and running into my army.

    Of course if you give control of the 2nd Seleukid army to the player the battle might become a bit to easy we after all have no real reason to flee the field like that coward Antiochos

    “By push of bayonets, no firing till you see the whites of their eyes”
    - Friedrich der Große

  22. #22

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    I've never liked having two Seleukid armies either. Unfortunately, it isn't possible to have enough Seleucid units to accurately portray the army's diversity and numerical superiority without having two. Starting the armies together was actually sort of a cheap trick of mine to encourage the 1.2 AI to fight. In my first version I had them farther apart, but the AI-controlled units only wandered around aimlessly. It is a lot more fun on 1.5. The Seleucid phalanx tends to be more cohesive and the cavalry aren't quite as stupid.

    Visit the EB Help Required Thread

    "His only addiction was to practice." - John Coltrane, describing Eric Dolphy

    "and thus it cannot be performed, because one cannot perform that which does not exist." - Arnold Schönberg

  23. #23
    Member Member antiochus epiphanes's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    cant wait for 0.8 but a little off topic, but how the heck did you get those close screenshots?

  24. #24

    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    yeah....uhm....it didn't work.....

    Sorry I am bad with screwing around with codes.

    I did what u said, but the battle didn't show in HISTORICAL BATTLES, and I couldn't play IMPERIAL CAMPAIN after that. Luckly I saved copies of the files I messed with

  25. #25
    "Audacity, always audacity!" Member Simmons's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Quote Originally Posted by antiochus epiphanes
    cant wait for 0.8 but a little off topic, but how the heck did you get those close screenshots?
    Its the battle cam check out my post here from the screenshots thread.
    https://forums.totalwar.org/vb/showp...&postcount=202

    “By push of bayonets, no firing till you see the whites of their eyes”
    - Friedrich der Große

  26. #26
    Member Member Oleo's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    Double heroic victory.. WOot

    Romans:


    Seleucids:
    EB member


  27. #27
    Member Member paullus's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    wow, i haven't been nearly that successful with the seleukids! how did you do that?

    and tk, how do you get the units to show up with custom unit numbers? if i assign numbers other than the standard size while in the editor, they still show up on the battlefield as the standard sizes.
    "The mere statement of fact, though it may excite our interest, is of no benefit to us, but when the knowledge of the cause is added, then the study of history becomes fruitful." -Polybios


  28. #28
    Member Member Oleo's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    well I cant really tell, you see it was a bit chaotic.. (I was the phalanx-army)

    The battle started by me sending my cavalry to the left flank, my plan was to combine all cavalry and kill the roman cavalry and combining the phalanx into one solid line. Unfortunately the AI (controlling the left flank) send all his cavalry and other troops to the right flank straight through the pezhetairoi, resulting in complete chaos.
    EB member


  29. #29
    aka Artaserse (the Lone Borg) Member Obelics's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    @TK i want to install your CB, but i would to know, does it modify somethink? i have 2 big campaign im enjoying and i would not to risk, ive also instlaled bonny sprite pack. no other thinks.
    Again this work will it be included in 0.8? If so i could wait for 0.8 and have all in one without modifing my 0.74 copy, thanks for any reply, and compliments, it is great to have EB own customized battle. (ah, and will there be more one for 0.8?)

    greets

  30. #30
    EBII Mod Leader Member Foot's Avatar
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    Default Re: EB Historic Battle - Magnesia

    It doesn't make any changes to the any of the eb unit/campaign/etc files. No files are changed, only files added. All additions take place in the following folder data/maps/battle/custom.

    Foot
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